Free Range Naturism

Naturism => Free Range Naturism => Topic started by: jbeegoode on May 01, 2018, 10:59:08 PM

Title: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 01, 2018, 10:59:08 PM
I found this "List of Golden Rules" in Lookee's "Secret Naturist Handbook."

"As a secret naturist you are usually operating in locations accessible to members of the public and there are a few very important rules and guidelines that should be followed during these times. These Golden Rules are not compulsory but are highly recommended, for you own safety.

1. Never leave all your clothing in one place, such as inside the car. Split into separate sets and hide each at different locations. Even if carrying your clothing, have a backup set hidden elsewhere.

2. If hiding clothing never leave house or car keys with your clothing. Hide them in a separate location so that if your clothing is lost or stolen, your keys should still be safe and secure.

3. Never visit the same location on a regular basis. If you go to the same place at 6.00pm every Tuesday evening and walk the same route, you are placing yourself in a potentially disastrous situation. Someone may be waiting for you!

4. When hiding clothing, make sure you will be able to find the spot when you return. Use a marker of some type to help identify the location.

5. Never reveal your secret naturist activities to anyone unless you are sure they can be trusted. Even then, consider the consequences of doing so.

6. Always look behind you. When you are concentrating on looking ahead, it can be easy to forget what might have appeared behind you."

Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: nuduke on May 26, 2018, 09:06:11 PM

Ok, enlighten me:  What's the difference between this thread and
The Craft of Being Safely Unseen: A Tool List (http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=1090.msg11475#msg11475)
?

John
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 26, 2018, 10:01:01 PM
These are Lookees Golden rules in high stealth mode. The other is our list for free range naturism, when it is a bad idea to be seen. Other than that, yup, there is a lot of grey nad over lap. that could be in the other list.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: eyesup on May 27, 2018, 12:18:55 AM
Quote from: John
What's the difference between this thread and ďThe Craft of Being Safely Unseen: A Tool ListĒ
It has a different name? :D

Duane
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: ric on May 27, 2018, 11:08:48 AM
golden rules ((presumably for free range naturism) doesnt necessarily involve being unseen. so the two threads will have differences.


my golden rule is relax and dont panic if seen or even in a close encounter,  just act natural .
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Bob Knows on May 27, 2018, 03:38:49 PM
golden rules ((presumably for free range naturism) doesnt necessarily involve being unseen. so the two threads will have differences.

my golden rule is relax and dont panic if seen or even in a close encounter,  just act natural .

Thank you for saying that.  My goal is also to be relaxed and demonstrate that nudity is normal while meeting clothed people.  My goal is to be an ambassador for nude living by being seen and displaying the beauty and comfort of nude living in non-threatening casual encounters.  Just act natural because nude is natural.   

Bob
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: nuduke on May 31, 2018, 05:34:30 PM

In Canada we got several drill briefings on bear encounters.  The golden rule was 'make yourself bigger and walk away slowly backwards'.
Similar strategy for naturist encounters?  I think not! :D
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Bob Knows on May 31, 2018, 07:07:33 PM

In Canada we got several drill briefings on bear encounters.  The golden rule was 'make yourself bigger and walk away slowly backwards'.
Similar strategy for naturist encounters?  I think not! :D


I just say something like "Nice day for a walk" while passing them on the trail or wherever.  No  need for bear spray when encountering humans. 
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 31, 2018, 11:51:41 PM
There is that good old bear bell joke, but as it comes to mind, I think that prudes which are offended to see other human bodies should wear bells to warn us. They are a tiny minority and could be accommodated that way. Sure, I'll put my hand over my genitals, smile and wave, letting them pass on. Then, wave a finger to their backs.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Bob Knows on June 01, 2018, 06:37:02 PM
There is that good old bear bell joke, but as it comes to mind, I think that prudes which are offended to see other human bodies should wear bells to warn us. They are a tiny minority and could be accommodated that way. Sure, I'll put my hand over my genitals, smile and wave, letting them pass on. Then, wave a finger to their backs.
Jbee

Excellent idea JBee.  Offended prudes could wear a bell to warn people they don't want to see. 
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 08, 2019, 08:47:55 PM
After further consideration, the bells would disturb wildlife. Because we are a minority, someone might think that we should wear bells.

This puts two fringe minority elements at each other, nudes and prudes. Both wish that they had free reign and others conform. One of those minority groups actually does have free reign, approval and but not particularly, has a wish that others join them. The other group sees that they have a right to impose their value system upon others and force others to join them. This says to me something about prudish personalities.

Both assume that the majority is concerned about nudity. It seems that both assumptions are incorrect. 97% are accepting of nude people.

When we talked with the Forest Service official, he was surprised when we popped up with stats. He assumed. So, it may be that significant numbers of the majority that accepts nude bodies assume that there are many who do object. Assuming that people object to nude bodies may be the greater obstacle to nude liberation, from authorities and law.

It follows that the better way to get over this obstacle is for people to see and read about nude bodies roaming around. Still, it is one reaction to think it out in one's livingroom and often another reaction to actually experience seeing a nude and realizing from the experience that it is no big deal and non-sexual. 
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Safebare on May 09, 2019, 12:21:50 AM
I blame the information superhighway for our abundance of malleable humans.  It is less about facts, science and data.  They (We?) have learned to be weary of information that doesn't fit our filters.  Take the big ruckus caused by the British Naturism group that rented the water park.  The 'prudes' were not going to listen to any facts regarding the safety of children in a naturist event.  Pedophiles are bad people and 'obviously' naked children would attract them.  The argument was lost from the start.
We must work to change the minds of those still listening.  We must stand up to the ignorance just like the park owner did in the BN event, knowing that they are just as much a minority as we are.  The 97% should be our focus.  The problem is in recognizing the remaining 3%.  No bells?!  Maybe we can all agree to go into a Body Snatcher's scream whenever we encounter one. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEStsLJZhzo)


~Safebare
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 11, 2019, 12:12:23 AM
Yea, why can't they all be the stoner college professor, wanna be poet from Animal House instead? 

That was dang freaky Safebare, but that is surely how people image what an encounter is like when at leas one body is uncovered.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Bob Knows on May 12, 2019, 06:59:25 PM
I have read recommendations to wear a bell when hiking in the back country.    The bell warns bears and other critters of your approach.   It is said that some hikers come around a corner and find themselves face to face with a very surprised bear who didn't hear you coming.  So they recommend wearing a bell. 

Maybe that would work for prudes too.  Nudes can be nasty when surprised in the wild. 
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 12, 2019, 11:48:09 PM
I'd expect a goat or a cow, if I heard a bell coming around the corner. When I worried more about getting caught naked, I didn't get caught naked. My senses were up.

That bear that got surprised in the Huachuca Mountains by us seemed alarmed. But we were sitting still and quiet, naked. Human beings are curious creatures to watch, too. Ya never know what their going to do.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: rrfalcon on May 18, 2019, 03:00:09 PM
This is probably the bear joke mentioned earlier, but I'll post it in case somebody here hasn't seen it:

IDAHO GRIZZLY NOTICE

In light of the rising frequency of human/grizzly bear conflicts, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game as well as National Forest service are advising hikers, hunters, and fishermen to take extra precautions and keep alert for bears while in the field.

We advise that outdoorsmen wear noisy little bells on their clothing so as not to startle bears that aren't expecting them. We also advise outdoorsmen to carry pepper spray with them in case of an encounter with a bear.

It is also a good idea to watch out for fresh signs of bear activity. Outdoorsmen should recognize the difference between black bear and grizzly bear droppings. Black bear droppings are smaller and contains lots of berries and squirrel fur. Grizzly bear dung has little bells in it and smells like
pepper spray.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Bob Knows on May 19, 2019, 02:57:53 PM
It is also a good idea to watch out for fresh signs of bear activity. Outdoorsmen should recognize the difference between black bear and grizzly bear droppings. Black bear droppings are smaller and contains lots of berries and squirrel fur. Grizzly bear dung has little bells in it and smells like pepper spray.

Some say that effective "bear spray" should be at least .40 caliber.

Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 19, 2019, 03:04:57 PM
Fifty.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 20, 2019, 10:37:51 PM
44 magnum with hollow points. Ruger has one that is short and light for hunting big game in tall grass...good for hunting, too.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 20, 2019, 11:02:55 PM
My reference to "fifty" was a joke of course, although a .50-70 was what I had in mind. There are no grizzlies where I live, although incredibly enough, bears have been reported in the Washington, D.C. suburb where I live. No lions but I figure it's only a matter of time. I've seen just about everything else within a mile of my back door, although rabbits are curiously scarce. Must be the foxes.

On a serious side, I would recommend a .44 magnum carbine, something on the order of a trapper lever action, if you can find one, if you aren't hunting. One individual whose opinion I respect suggests a 12-gauge. For hiking nude, I don't want a handgun, although a .44 revolver does carry nicely and you won't go off and leave it leaning up against a tree. But I have only seen three or four bears in the woods, so my experience is on the low side.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 20, 2019, 11:45:20 PM
No grizzles here, either.

I have a tomahawk with a spike for penetrating...got two flashlights, too. The flashlights are not to good in the day when the bears can see me.

I've been told to put my arms out big, make myself look as big as I can. The grizzles three times or more of me, will stay away, cause I look big...so, those flashlights. Say, at night a grizzle is curious, hold both out like two big eyes. Blinded it will think that you are huge, or use the light to come at you pissed off. If it gets blind enough, step aside as it passes and at least kick it in the balls, before you die.

Milfmog published that joke, I believe, on the SN site. I still love hearing it is all of the versions.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 21, 2019, 12:56:12 AM
It's easy to get worked up over the danger of wild animals in the woods. Even so, there are black bear fatalities now and then, even in New Jersey. A co-worker where I used to work displayed a photo of a bear on the deck at her parents house--in New Jersey. Most we've had was a deer, which we know only because we saw the tracks in the snow. I see deer tracks in the woods every time I go hiking (and that is within a mile of home) but I don't see the deer that often.

Still, animal attacks are rare enough not to worry too much about them. Assaults by humans are rare, too, but there was a murder on the Appalachian Trail in Wythe County, Virginia, a week or so ago, about 30 miles from where my father was from.

I still say the greatest danger is falling down--especially when you're at home.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: rrfalcon on May 25, 2019, 05:17:18 PM
One individual whose opinion I respect suggests a 12-gauge.

I've read of one person who carries a twelve-gauge for bear. His load is to have the first shell be 00 buckshot, and the rest are slugs.  The theory is that the buckshot will make the bear stop and stand up, and thus present a better target for the slugs. I have no bear experience at all, so I don't know how likely that is to work.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: John P on May 25, 2019, 07:50:26 PM
Here in the east we don't need to worry much about dangerous wildlife. As BlueTrain says, bears are quite common, but attacks on humans are very rare. I used to say "I've seen bears twice, and both times it was a furry rear end disappearing into the woods". But then as we drove on a dirt road in northern Maine, my wife and I saw an adult and a cub ambling across in front of us. Because we were in the car, my wife was able to think it was fun instead of scary! It's true that back in 2014, a man in New Jersey took a picture of a bear, and within a few minutes, that bear killed him.
https://www.nj.com/passaic-county/2014/11/hiker_snapped_pictures_of_bear_before_fatal_attack_in_west_milford.html

But Homo sapiens sapiens, now that's a really dangerous animal, and they're everywhere. May seem friendly, but they're highly unpredictable.

Hey BT, did you hear about the bear in Arlington a few days ago? Ha ha, Arlington, Massachusetts. But that's 8 miles from downtown Boston.
https://boston.cbslocal.com/2019/05/17/arlington-massachusetts-bear-police-news/
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: ric on May 26, 2019, 10:28:52 AM
one of the many plusses of living in the uk is we dont generally have dangerous animals roaming at will,   though you get occasional lunatic greenies who suggest releasing wild boar , wolves etc.
there are a couple of spots where wild boar are a problem , parts of the forest of dean on the welsh borders springs to mind.
the adder is our only iffy snake, theyre reputed to be timerous beasties that would rather scuttle off, ive never noticed one.

add in our lack of silly weather extremes and were generally pretty safe wandering about rural areas.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 26, 2019, 11:33:50 AM
I have always admired Britain, the way they have sensible weather. I spent some time wandering around the back roads somewhere south of Carlisle when I was on my way To The North. It reminded me of West Virginia a little, especially the roads. It looked isolated enough to generate stories of feral cattle, wild men and lost travelers. But crossing the continent from Newcastle to Carlisle when I was checking on the effectiveness of Hadrian's Wall to keep out illegals, it seemed quite bare but pleasantly hilly. The wall looked to be in need of repair in places, by the way, which may account for the drop in population in Scotland and all those foreigners in London. I could barely understand anyone.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: MartinM on May 28, 2019, 09:07:12 AM
one of the many plusses of living in the uk is we dont generally have dangerous animals roaming at will,   though you get occasional lunatic greenies who suggest releasing wild boar , wolves etc.
there are a couple of spots where wild boar are a problem , parts of the forest of dean on the welsh borders springs to mind.
the adder is our only iffy snake, theyre reputed to be timerous beasties that would rather scuttle off, ive never noticed one.

add in our lack of silly weather extremes and were generally pretty safe wandering about rural areas.
For your information, wolves are not dangerous animals, at least not when it comes to humans. They are shy retiring creatures, as easily seen as a dedicated secret naturist (I think they were in the thread somewhere..). Wolves occur all across Europe, including now even Holland,  with minimal risk to humans. Now dogs, they are dangerous animals, with many people injured and even killed (usually children) each year.

A much bigger problem is the ticks which carry Lymeís and other diseases mostly carried by deer. Iíve had two or three just over the weekend. A few wolves might help by keeping the deer population down.....
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 28, 2019, 11:41:02 AM
Even though there are lots of deer around here in the woods beginning back of the house, I haven't picked up a tick for a couple of years. It used to be something that would invariably happen now and then. I even went to the doctor once about 25 years ago when I discovered a tick on my belly, which resulted in one of those bullseye rashes. But nothing came of it. Anyway, it's very curious that I haven't picked one up lately. I haven't done anything different and I don't generally use insect repellant, which I've never been sure is worth doing.

On that note, given that I've done a fair amount of nude hiking, I have never been bothered very much with insects when I've been in the woods, nude. There are insects in abundance, to be sure, but I've never been troubled by them. They're still real pests, though, and I use the word troubled relatively. When I've gone somewhere for long hikes in warm weather, there are sometimes clouds of gnats hanging around the parking lots but they stay there and don't follow me down the trail. In sunny spots along the trail, there are sometimes horseflies, which can be vicious. There can be ticks, too, but if you avoid brushing up against foliage, you probably won't pick one up. I haven't been anywhere there are many mosquitos but there are plenty around the house. Of all of those, gnats are the most irritating, with their habit of trying to fly into your mouth, your eyes and so on around your head. They don't seem to bite, at least. Sometimes when I mow the lawn, there are clouds of an even smaller insect that behave like gnats. I doubt whether it makes any difference at all whether one is nude or not, given that most hikers don't wear very much to begin with, with shorts and a short-sleeved shirt.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: ddoger on May 31, 2019, 10:59:38 AM
DW and I wear flea collars around our ankles and spray our gators with Dr. Doom.  We use short nylon gators to keep the grass seeds from getting into our socks.  I also slide a 44mag into my hydro pack and have a bear banger in the pack as well.  Mostly to justify a loud bang if anyone should ask.  We have encountered 4 or 5 bears in our 15 or so years of hiking. Weíve had 2 close encounters with bears but the most scary experience was crossing the path of a large pack of coyotes. We werenít armed, so we picked up large sticks for protection.  They must have been on a kill because, thankfully for us, they didnít pay much attention to us. One of the dangers iím on the constraint lookout for is cougars.  Weíve had some local pets get mauled by what weíve assumed was a cougar and a neighbour lady was accosted by a cougar while she was riding her horse.  (The neighbour lady was riding the horse, not the cougar.) Very seldom do we go hiking and not see some sort of game.  We see mostly deer and woodchucks.  I think not wearing clothes (clothes have phosphates that eliminate) makes us less threatening to the critters in the forest.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Davie on May 31, 2019, 12:13:48 PM
Bears, wolves guns wow I'm glad I live this side of the pond but I have to say that my several visits to the US have all been wonderful experiences. If you walk around in the UK carrying that sort of ordnance you'll likely end up in prison. (Firearms and shotgun certificate holders acting responsibly exempted)

I need to point out that gaps in Hadrian's Wall are essential. The gaps allow the malt whisky south and us who live down south to go up to Scotland for The Gathering. This year almost 150 naturists stayed in Dunoon with naked walking, swimming and this year we took over a pub for lunch.

On a serious note its becoming a golden rule to check for ticks after a walk and to be aware of the dangers and signs of Lymes disease.

Nettles are a bit unpleasant too

Davie  8)
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 31, 2019, 02:41:12 PM
I have seen posts on other forums that claimed that packs of wild dogs were a serious threat in places and even feral cattle. I don't know if someone was pulling my leg or not but I have never heard a first hand account of such a thing. One certainly hears reports of dog attacks, though, but not wild dogs. I do not think coyotes are large enough individually to be a threat. I'm pretty sure I have seen one in the western part of the county about 20 miles from where I live. (Near Dulles Airport for those familiar with the area).

I had totally forgotten about irritating plants, including nettles, poison ivy and "stickers" of all varieties. But as I mentioned above, I try to avoid brushing up against the greenery because that's how the ticks hitch a ride. Mostly it isn't a problem, though, either when staying on the trail or under the trees were there isn't much undergrowth. In some places I used to hike either nude or in shorts, there were lots of low briers of some sort and my legs and ankles were always getting scratched up. Long pants and boots eliminate those problems entirely, of course, but they defeat the purpose. Those problems are present all year long but in cold weather the insects aren't so much of a problem. They don't seem to ever go away entirely, however.

This is all in places with lots of trees, bushes, grass and wet, muddy places with (these days) plenty of rain. I don't know what conditions are like in the Southwest. I did get in a little nude hiking when we were on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon but that was just one visit. I don't remember any insects and it was dry, in spite of a hailstorm while we were there.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Davie on May 31, 2019, 04:38:20 PM
I have seen reports of cattle trampling people but usually they are just curious. Bulls can be dangerous too. The most frightening experience I've had recently was stopping at the top of a fairly high hill for a bite to eat. It was a glorious day and I was naked. After taking a bite out of my sandwich I heard a buzzing noise. A swarm of bees decided to descend to the top of the hill. I moved - fast!

Fortunately the bees didn't follow me and after a few minutes buzzed off and normality returned.

Davie  8) 
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on May 31, 2019, 05:20:01 PM
I've never heard of a coyote attack. They are generally solo. I hear them in packs very often, but almost always at night. They will pick on critters smaller than them and go for the young. They aren't all that big themselves. They do roam around during the day, that's how I regularly see them. 

I like this, "Coyote attacks on people are very rare. More people are killed by errant golf balls and flying champagne corks each year than are bitten by coyotes."

Being nearly harmless, Their odd behavior may be caused by rabies. I was always made afraid of coyotes and dogs when I was a child in New Mexico, just because of the rabies factor. The adults made it sound like it was all around. It is rare. It does happen. Coyotes will just shy away, or take off. I see them crossing the road. They don't hang out there. I see them out my window, they are passing through, or hiding. If one didn't do that, I'd look for foam on the mouth.

Being in the middle of a group of coyotes, I imagine, would be a scary thing. They would be alarmed and those howls multiplied and amplified would be a true spook in close proximity. I have had them howling on my property maybe forty or 50 feet away and dang it feels real. I would expect them to scatter, if I walked into them, unless they had some food in the middle of them. Still, most likely they would be evasive, if I was stupid enough to mess with them like that.They are in the business of pets. They like to lure dogs away with a bitch in heat, then attack in a group, which is common.

Mountain Lions/cougars/pumas may attack livestock. Perhaps the woman on horseback was mistaken for livestock. Lions will attack anything that they perceive is running away. They seem to know enough to stay away from humans and run away. Internet statistics say that the odds and probabilities are nil that they would attack humans. They can be huge athletic and intimating. They have been running away whenever I have encountered them. I more often smell them, but don't see them. I avoid them, if I can. They are out there making a living. They don't take risks.

Statistics on Lyme's disease wasn't even taken until fairly recently, so says the internet. It is pretty rare in Arizona. "Although Lyme disease is not present in Arizona, there are still cases in Maricopa County from residents who have traveled to an endemic area or relocated to Arizona from an endemic area. On average, there are about 1-10 confirmed or probable cases of Lyme disease each year in Maricopa County. All of the confirmed or probable cases were exposed outside of Arizona, in areas where Lyme disease is endemic."

Dogs get ticks here, but not the lyme ones.

I just never think about ticks. I notice critters on me because I am nude. I give them little safe harbor. Crawling around in the muck getting errant golf balls in Virginia as a kid certainly got me some ticks, but I stay naked and stay out of places like that, now. Poison ivy stops growing at around 5000 ft. in Arizona, up to 8500 ft. in Colorado and New Mexico. Here it is just in very wet riparian areas and most of these are gone. If I'm in one of those, I try not to brush against plants, or stay away from them and on a trail, because who is under those plants is of more concern. "Because uroshiol is only found in resin canals, a plant must be bruised or attacked by chewing/sucking insects in order for the allergenic agent to be on leaves or stems. Uroshiol does not occur in pollen."

We don't have brown bears here. We have only black bears.

It would seem that Arizona is pretty user friendly, other than rattlers and scorpions.

Bees? There was the killer bee scare years ago. They got bred out. There are swarms in the spring that get my notice when I'm plain naked, but they are always in a swarm and high above. They stop me cold. I just stand and listen, alarmed. There has been no risk yet, with numerous swarms over the years. The local bees, look different than the usual yellow stripe folk. Saw one with the typical look and a brown Mohawk last week. It came across as pretty mellow.

There are many crawly things in the night in Arizona nature. I prefer a net tent, or bivy, instead of cowboy camping. Some of them will bite. There are ants. If we stop to eat a snack, we find a rock to sit. I put down a piece of cloth. Often, the ants will come out eventually, if a few aren't discouraging us when we arrive. That is why people are meant to squat-sit, I suppose.
Jbee
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: BlueTrain on May 31, 2019, 06:20:01 PM
I forgot to mention in my previous post that I was lucky enough this morning to see two foxes and I think they were two different ones. One of them I saw was chasing a squirrel in my back yard, which is a first (the squirrel got away). A week or so ago I saw one and followed it down the sidewalk for half a block. It had caught a chipmunk. And a few days ago, I saw a raccoon, moving faster than I thought raccoons moved. The first fifteen years we lived here, we did not see wildlife like that. Or maybe we just didn't notice them. Once in a very great while I'll see a snake.

None of them are particularly dangerous, except for some snakes, although some of them can make a nuisance of themselves sometimes.  But some places, people will try to kill anything that moves. It's called "sport."
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Peter S on May 31, 2019, 11:44:55 PM
When Iíve been walking lately Iíve noticed the sheep getting very curious. Once they used to run away, these days they stop and stare. Itís a bit spooky.

Cattle can be a problem because even if theyíre being friendly a half ton or so of prime rib can do a lot of damage. Cows are only a risk if you get between them and their calves. A herd of bullocks is worst, a bunch of bored and curious teenagers that like to run around. Iíve also been followed around by over-curious horses nudging my rucksack in search of treats.
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: Davie on June 01, 2019, 12:17:44 AM
Just watch out for the sheep. These were keeping a close eye on me whilst at a naturist venue.

Davie  8)
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: nuduke on June 02, 2019, 07:10:53 PM

Very disapproving looks from the sheep, Davie.  I'm not surprised they are cross - naturists do them out of their business - we don't need any wooly jumpers!


On the subject of bears (not bares) - in Canada last year I was strongly advised to go out hiking in the woods with a Bear Spray.  I suspect this is because the hotel we were at had a camping shop and did a roaring trade in massively priced bear spray!  Never used it thankfully although I came across a couple of bear scats on my relatively short hike.   I sold the spray to another hotel receptionist further on in our tour.  No shop there but the receptionists did a small pocket money trade for hikers out of that hotel in 2nd hand Bear Sprays!!  Recycling at its best :)
John
Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: jbeegoode on June 03, 2019, 07:38:28 PM
Yes, those nine sheep look like a football line up ready to go on the offense. There are not many sheep. I've seen sheep do this stare thing up in Navajo country.

There are too often cattle running on leased Federal and State lands. The males have been fixed and show no aggressive attitudes. They spend so much time alone, they often bolt away. Cattle gather around vehicles looking to be fed. Their paddies can be a hazard, and create flies. Their trails can mislead a hiker. Overall, they just crap out the natural experience, destroying the ecosystem and watercourses.
Jbee



Title: Re: Golden Rules
Post by: nuduke on June 08, 2019, 01:24:34 PM
YThe males have been fixed and show no aggressive attitudes. Jbee

I would argue with the term 'Fixed'.  Hardly a repair! :(
John