Free Range Naturism

Naturism => Free Range Naturism => Topic started by: BlueTrain on July 12, 2018, 10:54:30 PM

Title: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 12, 2018, 10:54:30 PM
Here are a couple of unrelated items of marginal interest; one good, one bad.

The bad one is about me. I finally went to the doctor about a "wound" on the top of one ear that has refused to heal in over a year, maybe less. My excuse for not going to the doctor sooner, which was the first thing he asked, was because the last twelve months was a bad twelve months. My place of employment got sold a year ago tomorrow (which finally resulted in three-quarters of the company being laid off last February) and all the agony and tension that went with that and I had a hernia operation. The hernia operation was nothing. The rest was terrible. Anyway, I didn't explain all that to the doctor. I just said I finally came after all.

The diagnosis was that have several spots, all on my head and ears, that are pre-cancerous. But they can all be dealt with more or less routinely. I started life as a redhead and had a few bad sunburns when I was little. That raises my risk factor substantially. I'm not related to anyone who ever had melanoma but they're all dead anyway. And we're going to the beach week after next. But I never set foot on the beach last time we went anyway and so I'm not worried about that. It shouldn't affect my so-called lifestyle, even that part of it that is live nude. Just about all the places I ever hiked nude have been in the shade, so I guess that could continue. Nothing to worry about.

The good thing is something that will interest some of you. According to an article in the paper today, some people believe there are health benefits to being in contact with the earth. Literally. Meaning as in barefoot. Works on sand, earth, grass, rock and even concrete, but not other kinds of pavement, it said. It also works if you wear shoes with leather soles. Something about the electrical charge in the ground or something like that. So those of you who hike barefoot might be onto something. For the rest of you, keep your dog away from part of the lawn and take a walk now and then in your bare feet. If positive reports are forthcoming, maybe I'll even try it.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: jbeegoode on July 13, 2018, 07:15:03 AM
Good prognosis! The guy that I'm caring for has had multiple cancers that I've had to care for. Some the size of half dollars, but still no worries, if he would just leave them alone  and let them heal wet. Dementia the problem. Anyway all very routine, as long as one is religious about the prescribed after care.

I have a red head friend just a few years more than you that has been getting the stuff for years here and there. It's just a hassle. No worries.

The grounding is called "Earthing." It has had obvious benefits for DF and me. We use the sheets to sleep, barefoot, I even have a rig for my wrist when camping. I wake up much less stiff and sore. I scowered this site with my cell tonight for 15 minutes looking for the thread with extensive discussion of this topic to no avail. It must be burried in some off topic discussion. Eyesup seems to have a knack for finding old posts.

If you look for "earthing" you'll find the people who sell the sheets, etc. That leads to best information. Then the originator has a full length documentary about it that is quite entertaining, when he gifts a whole little town in Alaska earthing tools. Anyway, Bob and I recommend pursuing more info, and have done our testimonials then there are still others here, like Nuduke that have experimented.

I got better sleep, and persistent sciatica knocked out in a few days, much more.
Jbee 
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: jbeegoode on July 13, 2018, 07:34:37 AM
Here's the fun movie:
https://www.youtube.com/embed/cRW0XO2xWn4?rel=0
Jbee
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: ric on July 13, 2018, 09:55:22 AM
my wife swears by it

weve got an earthing mat at the bottom of the bed.... cheaper than full blown earthing sheets....wire goes out the window to a groundspike.   im sceptical about using the electric socket earth... its possible to get stray voltages... unlikely but possible.

early on we used antistatic wrist straps arround ankles at night... doable but a bit of a hassle.

damp grass is probably best for barefoot contact.  i dont spend much time barefoot....partly because when im not wearing glasses i cant see the ground clearly.   ill risk lawns but not anything less well tended.

even if you are sceptical about the electrical grounding there the barefoot stimulation of the reflexology points  on the sole of the feet to consider.

i guess the bottom line is a bit of barefoot walking doesnt cost anything ,  may have benefits .. so why not.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: MartinM on July 13, 2018, 10:07:02 AM
I donít believe the electrical earthing story. A scam to sell junk based on some very dodgy physics about free electrons and negative charge.

However, there are multiple benefits to walking barefoot and having direct contact with the earth. You just donít need to fall for buying the earthing sheet etc, like I did initially before doing further investigation.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 13, 2018, 12:26:10 PM
The article used the term "grounding" but didn't mention sheets or anything you needed to buy. The whole idea might sound a little hokey but a hundred years ago, men wouldn't venture outside in the tropical zones without a sun helmet lined with green stuff or something, a spinal pad (to deflect the rays of the sun) and a flannel belt (a sort of cummerbund worn beneath the clothing). That is, white men who took those things seriously. Probably British, too.

The concept is loosely connected to nudism, I suppose, and in this case, "naturism" would indeed be a more correct term. It sort of goes along with the legend that some people can't wear an electric watch because they don't have the right polarity or something. There are lots of things like that (grounding), mostly things extracted totally out of context from some "native" practice. When I was little, I had plenty of contact with dirt--I mean the ground.

One thing I do believe regarding nudism as well as naturism is that the body benefits as much from exposure to air as it does to the sun. Some of us obviously need to be more careful than others when it comes to the sun, of course, although it's usually too late by I've never experienced a sauna, sweat lodge or anything like that, except that our local rec center has a huge hot tub, well-patronized the few times I've been there. It's very nice but might not be to everyone's taste.

I'd like to hear a little more about Indian-style sweat lodges, something that might be regarded as naturism.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: Bob Knows on July 13, 2018, 02:09:41 PM

If you look for "earthing" you'll find the people who sell the sheets, etc. That leads to best information. Then the originator has a full length documentary about it that is quite entertaining, when he gifts a whole little town in Alaska earthing tools. Anyway, Bob and I recommend pursuing more info, and have done our testimonials then there are still others here, like Nuduke that have experimented.
I got better sleep, and persistent sciatica knocked out in a few days, much more.
Jbee


I think the Earthing (electric grounding) sheets have been discontinued.  Ours wore out where my rough feet cause more sheet wear than the rest of our bodies.  I have found that one negative of full time bare feet is they tend to wear out sheets more quickly. 

I contacted the Earthing people earthing.com (http://earthing.com) and they said they were having supplier problems.  They said to check back in a couple of months.   

They now have some kind of pad 54x72 inches.  They say it fits beds of all sizes.  They say it works even when covered by a conventional polyester fitted bottom sheet.   One of the customer comments complained that the attached elastic straps are on the wrong edges when turned cross-ways on a king size bed.

I may have to get one of the pads.  My fitted sheet wore out.  I still have my grounding foot pad by my computer.   

Bob
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: Bob Knows on July 13, 2018, 02:24:07 PM
The diagnosis was that have several spots, all on my head and ears, that are pre-cancerous. But they can all be dealt with more or less routinely. I started life as a redhead and had a few bad sunburns when I was little. That raises my risk factor substantially. I'm not related to anyone who ever had melanoma but they're all dead anyway. And we're going to the beach week after next. But I never set foot on the beach last time we went anyway and so I'm not worried about that. It shouldn't affect my so-called lifestyle, even that part of it that is live nude. Just about all the places I ever hiked nude have been in the shade, so I guess that could continue. Nothing to worry about.

I'm sorry to hear you are having skin problems.  When I was young I also got severely sunburned a couple of times, worse on my shoulders and back than my head.  Now I almost always wear a hat out in the sun. 

There is a lot of evidence that the scare of sun which was promoted 20 years ago has caused more health problems than it cured.  My mother and probably many other people began wearing long sleeves shirts and full body covers outside. High number chemical sun blocker is still marketed.  But medical evidence now abounds that regular sunshine causes natural vitamin D production and other beneficial effects which prevent cancer all over our bodies including our skin. Some studies have also shown that the toxic chemicals in sun blocker are not healthy either. 

Some studies show that dark skin people from tropical ancestry suffer higher death rates in high latitudes from lack of sunshine.  The higher death rate was enough to drive fairly rapid evolution of light skin humans in northern lands.  Blond and red hair people are adapted to living where sunshine is scarce much of the year, and consequently suffer where sunshine is abundant.  My ancestors lived somewhere between the tropics and the north so I'm blessed with brown hair and skin that changes color when exposed to sunshine.   

You're going to have to wear a hat outside, BlueTrain.  Keep the sun off your head and ears. 

Quote
The article used the term "grounding"

Grounding is the American word.   Earthing is the UK word.  Both mean the same thing, connected electrically to the unlimited reservoir of free electrons of mother earth.   

Bob


Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 13, 2018, 03:01:32 PM
I'm an American, so I don't speak English. I've been to the U.K. and could almost understand most people, so I guess the languages are somewhat related.

I do generally wear a broad-brimmed hat outside but most of my walks are in the shade, thankfully. I still think that it's odd that skin problems appeared on my face and ears rather than on my back and shoulders, where I actually got sunburned. Could be worse, I suppose. Could be raining.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: ric on July 13, 2018, 09:08:31 PM
if you stick earthing sheet into ebay uk search  bed sheets are there circa 120 quid.....   we went the cheap way with anti static earthing  mats, designed for the electronics repair industry  ,    got a bench mat accross the bottom of the bed ,   can be initially a bit cold to the touch on a winters night but soon get ued to it.... bit like sitting on a cold leather chair.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: jbeegoode on July 13, 2018, 10:52:09 PM
I was skeptical at first, too. I talked it over with my electrical engineer son, and we had quite a debate. He doesn't see how it works grounding to a wall socket, reasoning by what he knows. Still because of the anecdotal factor and the common sense of it, I took to experiment.

First morning obvious dramatic difference in sleep and rest. I wasn't so stiff and sore. Still as usual concerned with suggestibility, Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist that I am, I kept sleeping and it kept that improved. On the third day, I got up, walked into the kitchen for water, and returned sat on the bed and my jaw dropped. I had had these stiff ankles every morning for years and they we're there. I forget how many days later, but in a short while, my persistent sciatica disappeared. I had tried so many things for months and it just dropped off.

I keep a rod and a wrist band in my backpack. I generally feel a good workout backpacking. Grounding at night, I get up much easier. This stuff, I wasn't looking for. Serious chronic pain going away isn't placebo, its anti-infammatory response. After weeks and at times when one forgets to look or drops expectations is when one can judge placebo.

We know of the anti static pads effects in factories, etc. It isn't all hype. I thinking that there is more to our response and makeup than eliminating some static.

These day, years later, I honestly don't notice any dramatic differences when I don't use the grounding devices, like the sheets. There is a warning about washing it is proper detergent and a frequency. I don't know if the sheets wear out.

My favorite item is the quilt. It feels great, plugged in or not.
Jbee
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: Bob Knows on July 14, 2018, 03:15:37 AM
When I studied chemistry in High School (and then in college) the first thing you learn is about "valence" numbers and electron sharing.  Chemistry is all about atoms being joined or not by sharing electrons.  When there are extra electrons such as when you put an acid and metal together you get electrons being pushed by a force, you have a battery.  If you apply an electric voltage current to a compound you can separate compounds into separate atoms.  Water, for example, separates into hydrogen and oxygen.   Chemists sometimes call an impressed electric force as a "bias."

Human bodies operate on very complicated wet chemistry.  Wet chemistry involves electron sharing or giving up between many chemicals. We have very little data on just what changes when an electric voltage is applied to our bodies.  It is easy to imagine that a one or two volt bias improves some body chemistry but interferes with other body chemistry.  The Earthing people demonstrate that living ungrounded among electric equipment results in about one volt or more charge on a human body.  The electric charge goes away immediately if a hand or foot is grounded. 

I don't know just what body chemistry is helped or hurt by a bias voltage, but I doubt continual all day every day voltage helps our overall health.  Even a small voltage all the time will have some effect on our wet chemistry.   Grounding can't hurt and may help. 

In response to Jbee's comment about grounding with a wall plug, the ground pin is connected to a ground rod in the earth at each home with copper wire.  Connection to the ground wire is electrically equal to going outside barefoot and standing on the ground. 
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: ric on July 14, 2018, 10:06:38 AM
the preference i have for a dedicated ground rod and earth wire over a leccy socket is the earth wire to the electric socket is parallel to and in close proximity to the power conductors.    if theres a fault in the grounding yu can get small voltages induced in the ground wire.    the fault can be as simple as our current dry weather drying the ground round the ground spike so the copper rod doesnt have a good connection to earth... it relies on some dampness in the soil.    hence the old advice to chuck a bucket of water over the rod in dry weather.

having said all that most of the uk is on a pme system...permenant metal earth...the leccy board run an earth wire in with the supply wires so hopefully were all connected back to main earth points.

but as murphy said if something can go wrong sooner or later it will.


this is another of those areas where theres empirical evidence but little money to be made so nobody will fund "proper scientific" studies to find out exactly how it works..... but for me if i can see the benifits, whether placebo or not i dont really need to know the how.


grounding is just one of the "wacky" ideas ive taken on board in the last couple of years..... all i can say is im feeling  improvements....i dont know which one or combination is working but none of them  take a lot of time or money.

a short list of some "wacky " ideas

use the cell phone as little as poss, always at arms lenght on speaker  not by the bed at night.
keep electronics away from the bed

drink well water rather than chlorinated mains water.
lightly freeze drinking water... the first ice to form has most of the deuterium in it... the remaining water is mostly normal light hydrogen.   theory is low d20 water helps prevent cancers.

avoid artificial light, it mucks up your circadian rythems

blue light from screens is bad... watch the tv in the dark wearing sun glasses.

body needs a high salt diet....not the low salt weve been brainwashed with .

guess thats enough for now


Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 14, 2018, 11:34:57 AM
Interesting ideas. The only thing worth adding is someone's belief that too much reading ruins your eyes. That one's easy to believe. These days, so many people wear glasses that nobody gets called "four-eyes" anymore.

I don't have a cell phone or smart phone. I don't watch television, except that using this here computer probably makes up for it, including the cell phone. I've also heard the claim that anyone who drinks water deserves whatever happens to them. That probably came from Scotland. I heard it back when I used to associate with several people from Scotland (and England, too).

Circadian rhythms are new to me. But what is artificial light? Fluorescent bulb? Incandescent bulb? Oil lamp? The light of the moon? The warm glow of a computer screen--probably not. I do think we have a built-in clock, so to say, more or less accurate, but it's something we can set ourselves, for what it's worth. But that may have nothing to do with rhythms.

What about copper bracelets?   
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: ric on July 14, 2018, 02:50:31 PM
I was reading recently about updates to the Bates method of better sight without glasses.   In a nutshell the eye focusses by muscles altering the length of the eyeball.   When\if those muscles get weak you get long or short sight.   It needs constant changes of focus from near to far to keep them toned.   Fixed focus on a specific distance for long periods ,as in reading book or screen, weakens them.  Glasses remove the need to try to focus so make the sight worse......   
Apparently the  way forward is to exercise the eye muscles and throw the glasses away.

Harry Benjamin, take off your glasses and see.    It's a fairly old book pre computer usage.

But there's a newer one out .. give up your glasses for good. Nathen oxenfeld, but I haven't read it yet. 20 plus quid on Amazon.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: Peter S on July 14, 2018, 04:16:39 PM
When my dad was in the Navy, back in the Ď40s, his eyesight was flagged as a problem at his medical. Expecting to be tons to get glasses, instead the doctor gave him exercises to do. As a result he didnít need glasses till well into his 60s.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: Bob Knows on July 15, 2018, 02:30:00 AM
Staring at a screen hour after hour is hard on eyes. 
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 15, 2018, 01:11:17 PM
Easy on the brain, I expect.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: nuduke on July 15, 2018, 06:23:24 PM

After encouragement and info from Jbee I had a period where I practiced earthing/grounding.
I was hoping it might have an effect on my stiff back or my annoying periodic skin rash.
I set up an earthed rig using a flat copper sheet and connected that to the electrical earth (which is into the ground in UK via earth wires, drain pipes, water pipes etc. all of which are eventually buried and form a good electrical connection to earth) on which I put my bare feet when working at the PC (which I spent a helluva lot of time at in those days).
I'm afraid I didn't experience any very perceptible effects except perhaps an evanescent and very hard to pin down general feeling of well being whilst earthed.
Since we moved house in 2015 I haven't resurrected the kit, I'm afraid.  However the back has been much helped by yoga and the rash by antihistamines as it turned out to be an idiopathic form of urticaria - still a mystery what causes it.  Earthing did not reduce its incidence at all.

Whilst, like Martin M, I am not convinced by the explanations for earthing as a proven phenomenon and await evidence as to why, how and if it works, I am however, as a dyed in the wool reductionist rationalist, nonetheless happy to accept others' empirical evidence as some sort of reason to use it.  Although my earthing kit is in the cupboard, I do walk on the earth a lot barefoot for the earthing possibilities.


Has anyone ever reported any negative side effects of earthing?  I have noticed over the years that quite a few 'alternative' therapies and things people take for different reasons like homeopathy or mineral supplements are reported to work or not work, as the case may be, yet none of them seem to have bad effects on  people.  I take this as evidence that a lot of these things don't actually have a scientific effect except on a placebo level.  However, one must not dismiss them out of hand - just because they appear not to be active chemically or biologically does not mean they are not positively therapeutic.  Many people find them beneficial.  So we must all discriminate for ourselves what therapies are useful and active in our own bodies and minds.  Many ancient remedies are therapeutic and many others (e.g. herbal remedies) contain active drug compounds that do the work.  The problem is that not everything is properly or extensively researched meaning that what a substance does for you is based on empirical and anecdotal evidence which tends to vary.


So, I shall continue to earth in bare feet.  I may even look out my earthing kit again.
John
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 15, 2018, 09:38:27 PM
I can report with confidence that sleeping on the ground does not improve one's sleep. At least it never did mine. Maybe there was too much insulation. However, I grew up hearing a lot about traditional lore. I suspect that since that was a couple of generations ago, most of it has probably been forgotten. Much of it had to do with growing things and nobody there keeps a (vegetable) garden anymore. If they do, they should know that you have to plant things according to the signs, as given in the Farmer's Almanac. I don't recall if wearing a copper bracelet was one of them but I think some people believed that carrying certain things around in your pockets was supposed to be worth doing, only I don't remember what things. I imagine that most of those things were brought over from Europe and what didn't, came from the Indians. At least nobody mentioned werewolves or even real wolves.

There was a magazine entitled "Foxfire," which was about southern Appalachian culture, crafts and history, later published in book form. I never read any myself, not wanting to make apple butter or built a log house, although I did live in one. No doubt all sorts of folk remedies and such things were included. But most things along those lines, like carrying something special in your pocket, were mentioned in such a way as to suggest that they didn't have complete faith in the claim but it was more a case of "it wouldn't hurt."

Some of those things work but chances are, the reasons they do (and sometimes don't) have to be scientifically grounded, not faith based. And circumstances are apt to be more complicated that people generally realize. In other words, someone said that grounding/earthing works best when the ground is moist. So it may not work too well out in Arizona. But the air is good if you have respiratory problems--or used to be.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: nuduke on July 19, 2018, 09:37:44 PM

I agree Blue Train, a scientific grounding to explain phenomena is essential.  But that doesn't mean to say there is no place for faith or empirical experience in the function of something.  A lot of old wives' remedies are based on sound scientific principles and others work but we don't know why yet.  The classic is willow tree bark extract that was used for centuries to treat pains and fevers.  That's because it contains the equivalent of aspirin (Salicin) from which Aspirin was eventually isolated and synthesised.  Foxglove, digitalis is another - led to a major heart drug Digoxin.  Also the placebo effect has been shown to be amazingly strong in those that believe in it even though they know they are using an inactive placebo.  So if there are reasons to believe in something having an effect then that can have the desired effect whether or not there is any specific scientific grounding.  I just isn't cut and dried.  I am a fierce reductionist - I believe there's a scientific reason for everything - but I believe that there are many things that are currently beyond scientific reasoning.  That is no reason to dismiss or avoid the things that presently defy explanation.  Quite the reverse in fact.  Engaging with them makes it more likely that an explanation may occur to someone.


Consider earthing: The thing about earthing is that it is not beyond plausible that there is a connection between the electrical activity in the body and the ability of the earth to absorb electrons.  The Earthers claim you receive energy from the earth by connecting with it.  I find that hard to believe. However, anyone with a home electrical test multimeter can measure the change in body resistance when you earth yourself.  I think its more plausible to speculate that what happens is that there is a small flow of electrons to earth when you improve contact with the earth such as in going barefoot or connecting with the electrical earth and this may (or may not) have some sort of beneficial effect.  While the earthers make no reference to a mechanism by which a flow of electrons out of the body could affect the body, I am happy to be pluralistic and accept others' benign faiths and beliefs in my belief that a reductionist, rational, scientific explanation will eventually emerge as to the effects of those beliefs.  Who knows, one day, like aspirin, yoga or using mouldy bread to put on infected wounds, one of them may change the world for the better.


In my early days of going naked in the woods and to an extent today, I would feel what I called an 'earth energy' whilst meditating naked on the leafy floor of a wood or hugging a tree or just feeling the breeze on my skin.  This is a metaphysical, ontological thing and I have no doubt is self-generated.  I just want to feel uplifted in these circumstances and so I allow my self  and mood (spirit?) to be uplifted.  The effect is calming, energising and if I'm lucky, slightly mystical.  Naked in nature I like to feel like a creature of nature (which I am not!) but I can open my mind to such possibilities and let the feeling of that experience flood in.  None of that is scientific nor does it imply a particular belief or faith.  However it is a meditative state which my mind invites to happen, the result being inner calm, positive thought outcomes and so a love of being naked in nature.  I call that earth energy.



As my dear old dad used to say in a broad Yorkshire accent and with a jolly wink of the eye, to avoid getting dragged into political conversations or the consideration of religions, "I believe in Giblet Pie!"


John
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 19, 2018, 11:37:13 PM
The usual comment is "I believe I'll have a drink." And just like a drink, different people will undoubtedly be affected differently by these phenomena. I suppose also that the subject (the person) has to be receptive, too. But in like manner, different people will perceive the problems differently. For instance, I doubt that any teenager would report any sleeping problems, other than perhaps not getting enough sleep. Apparently we require less sleep as we get older. Ironically, we have fewer reasons to go to bed and fewer reasons to get up.

I've been hiking nude in the woods (basically just walking, really) since I was in high school. I simply don't tan, being a natural red head, or was, but most of the places I have been were shady anyway, so the sun was not an issue. My skin problems originated at the city swimming pool, not in the woods. But it feels good not to wear clothes outside under a wide range of conditions. That is my motivation. I can't say I've felt any electrical energy out walking, unfortunately. I walk and I rest but I don't meditate. Elevated thinking doesn't happen to me when I'm being extra careful on a rough and rocky trail and perspiration is dripping off me like I just stepped out of a salty shower. That's another thing: it doesn't evaporate! Where I live, it's usually far too humid for sweat to just evaporate and most of the time in the woods, there is virtually no breeze. That only changes when I reach the more open places along the ridges. In contrast, a couple of places I can think of are windy most of the time. At home and indoors, none of these conditions apply but it's still good to be nude, which I manage to do two or three hours a day, not counting when I'm sleeping, also nude. That is, without wearing anything in bed. I'm under the covers, so I'm not really nude, I guess.

We are all creatures of nature and of this world. What is unnatural is something that cannot be done. We cannot fly like birds and however batty we might be, we can't fly like a bat, either. Men are not from Mars and women are not from Venus.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: ric on July 20, 2018, 09:40:08 AM
nuduke.....as i understand it  current thinking is that the earth is neg charged and gives up electrons to the body during earthing.

my other half recommends  earthing the most important health discovery ever,   clinton ober and stephen sinatra     available on amazon and kindle.
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: BlueTrain on July 21, 2018, 02:23:11 PM
Some of this sounds like feng shui, which I think is supposed to be "using energy sources to harmonize individuals with the surrounding environment." I have a compulsion to do certain things to suit myself, at least when I have the energy and the spirit moves me, but it isn't the same thing. I just like things orderly. Es muss Ordnung geben!
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: jbeegoode on July 21, 2018, 10:42:22 PM
China's most important bank is supposed to have a corner cut out of it, to accommodate a lay line. Some Chinese Feng Shui does deal with earth energies, positive and negative. Most of what I read in Western FengShui books sounds to be some intuitive ideas that make as much sense to me as not walking under a ladder, or crossing black cats. I understand a sense of openness in a room, symbolic unconscious effect, practical considerations and room decor, but these books get extreme with nothing backing them up, but fear.

During my wealthy years, I left my toilet lids open. Then someone comes by and tells me that my riches will flush down it, if I leave it open. The lid is a practical consideration with female home use. They want the seat down, Guys want it up. So shut the whole thing and everybody is hassled equally and it looks tidy. ;)

The Earthing has demonstrated to me that it works. The dowsing, I can personally feel and demonstrate. The transpersonal energies more than prove themselves. I am more apt to go with something I can see, touch and feel, like barefoot and nude, not reactions and anxieties.
Jbee
Title: Re: A couple of things
Post by: Peter S on July 22, 2018, 08:51:26 AM
The number of things that can - and do - get dropped into an open toilet bowl and accidentally flushed away gives credence to that one. And walking under ladders risks falling objects, so no superstition then. Having moved house on Friday 13th and experienced the one dry day in three months of near continuous rain I think Iíve disproved that one. Black cats have witchcraft connotations, take that as you will; I believe unlucky 13 is to with the Last Supper, so ditto; and that rabbitís foot wasnít lucky for the rabbit, so go figure.