Free Range Naturism

Naturism => Free Range Naturism => Topic started by: JOhnGw on August 14, 2015, 09:01:32 AM

Title: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: JOhnGw on August 14, 2015, 09:01:32 AM
I am starting this topic as a place where everybody's tips, hints and techniques can be shared.
Please will SNS refugees forgo our usual tendency to topic wander here so that it becomes a really useful resource for beginners in the art.
With a bit of luck Stuart and Karla will find it suitable for pinning.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Rang Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 14, 2015, 08:31:42 PM
It would be nice in an organizational sense to keep these tips here, but I have a navigation problem, as things keep going so fast. For instance, Larry is writing about stealth on a sandbar and I responded with the use a raft to cover with trick's intricacies, both good craft tips. I then saw this too late and the spontaneous other spot got lost. Then I thought that the solution would be to link to the crafty posts from here. So, when I tried to get back to the thread, I couldn't find it, as we are so mislabeled and drifted. Perhaps it will turn up in replies later.

Point is, when there is a good craft tip, we can remember to link to it from here, rather than double post, or to draw away from another conversation. This thread is a good idea.

On my website, I try to place a craft lesson into each trip report, That way, people can learn as we have, a bit here and there during adventures. What works in one context may be risky in another situation...live and learn.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Rang Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 14, 2015, 08:34:55 PM
Carnuding when running errands tips of the craft are found on this page: http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=679.0

Title: Re: The Art of Free Rang Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 14, 2015, 10:14:05 PM
All students hereby arise in puris naturalibus secretum.

Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: tanman on August 17, 2015, 04:10:40 PM
Quote from: Jbee
... Larry is writing about stealth on a sandbar ...

That would be here on the 'Walk in the desert!' thread, of course:  http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=627.msg2101#msg2101

Quote from: Jbee
... I responded with the use a raft to cover with trick's intricacies ...

That would be here:   http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=627.msg2123#msg2123

Have fun with the CRAFT, naked!
Larry (tanman in Texas)
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 17, 2015, 07:30:04 PM
Vehicles, tents, lawn chairs, strategically arranged using adjacent natural brush and tree visual screens can make for private CO areas ...

Many small rivers and shorelines have steep banks/berms, below which one can easily be concealed while naked in the sun ...


http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/08/17/a-memorable-week/
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on August 24, 2015, 11:15:23 PM
I am going to assume that anyone reading this already knows the basics about hiking. What gear to have what supplies, etc.  The 10 essentials and all that can be found on any legitimate hiking website.

I suppose we should clarify each tip with whether it is for those more intrepid and just don't worry about whether they are seen, or are like me and would just rather not see anyone. Sometimes when I am out I care less than other times. It varies. Usually I would rather not bump into anyone and have to deal with that.

Since I live in a desert my tips are unique for that, such as remaining motionless when I see someone, where my coloring allows me to sort of blend in to the background, especially at a distance. Even someone without a tan would be hard to spot as long as they aren't wearing anything bright (hats, backpacks, etc) and aren't moving.

When I have walked away from my clothes, still carrying my gear but caching my clothes so I am completely naked with no cover, I pick a spot inconspicuous and off the trail. I also try to make sure to leave no marks wherever I have put them. I suppose that is a bit paranoid.

I also choose sites during the week when it is less busy and those that are less traveled.

More as I think of them.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Peter S on August 25, 2015, 03:39:27 PM
Quote
Even someone without a tan would be hard to spot as long as they aren't wearing anything bright (hats, backpacks, etc) and aren't moving.

In the '60s and '70s SAS apparently painted their desert-going Land Rovers pink, as it was discovered this worked as very good camouflage, particularly around dawn and dusk. The long wheelbase Land Rovers became known as the Pink Panthers, as the Peter Sellers films of that name were popular at the time

peter
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on August 25, 2015, 04:54:42 PM
I have a friend that is a helicopter pilot and works for a emergency airlift company. He once flew search and rescue missions. When we were still in Scouts and discussing how to ensure a rescue group could spot us if we needed, it I asked him what was the best color to do so.

When flying at altitude and looking for something that shouldn't be there, fluorescent pink was the color as I recall. He said most other colors can be found in nature in some form. But not that one.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Davie on August 27, 2015, 02:56:01 PM
How times have changed. I have some walking guide books by W H Poucher. (still the best guides for Snowdonia and the Lake District). His recommendation was red socks as they could be seen at a distance.

Davie  8)
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on August 27, 2015, 06:05:25 PM
Correct me if I'm mistaken, isn't the 'Lake District' north, up close to Scotland.

I've never been there, hope to correct that someday, but photos I've seen show a cold and subdued landscape without much color (of the plant type). It may be that red is the best color for that area.

Here in the Mojave Desert there are an amazing number of bright colors of flowers. Granted, they don't survive long, but if you Google or 'Library' desert succulents or cactus, you will see red, magenta, purple, white and yellows all displaying many different shades of each color. You need something that stands out as 'not normal'.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on August 27, 2015, 11:57:10 PM
Quote from: eyesup
I am going to assume that anyone reading this already knows the basics about hiking. What gear to have what supplies, etc.  The 10 essentials and all that can be found on any legitimate hiking website.

To assume makes...etc!  No, Duane you can't assume that.  What are the 10 essentials?  Any website recommendations to look at for the rest of it?

John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: HairlessNude on August 28, 2015, 06:23:33 PM
I was always taught that the color blue was the only color you won't find naturally in the woods. The only thing wrong about that around here, is tom turkey's can have blue heads.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 28, 2015, 08:02:06 PM
I wonder how many tom turkeys are getting rescued by mistake in a given year? :D

Those emergency bivy sacks and space blankets are a florescent orange and stand out pretty good, depending. They are large to be seen. That is if you are day hiking and have trouble. They weight little, are folded small, only 12 or 15 bucks at REI. 

I carry a mirror. It is small, this one weighs like an ounce, and made less destructible, less than four bucks. I have it placed in a Ziploc baggie to protect it's surface, because it serves other duties, as well. Just gotta make sure I don't blind the helicopter pilot and lay out two of us, or get buried in the pile.  ;D There used to be a smuggler's plane wreck up on the hillside. The refection could be seen for miles.

The eyes respond to movement. One of the 10 necessities that DF was reading to me going up to the mountains last week was a whistle. I never carry one. I suppose that I can scream in agony, pretty good...naturally. Whistles are for the birds.

I carry a snow tent stake for digging and for a weapon.
A small roll of TP
A hand/butt wipe pad, or two
A pair of tweezers
Plenty of water, at least two liters, unless there will be a water source and I take a filter.
 That's my five necessities. If I was out alone in more extreme tooleys, I'd take duct tape and an emergency bivy.

For longer days, I take plenty of lightweight snacks/a lunch focusing on protein and nutrition. Dehydrated re-fried black beans with hummus, dehydrated apple slices. Those date, blueberry, chia, superfood health things are very good, energy and filling. A bag of almonds and cashews, and carrots hold up well. And of course my favorite Cliff Bar. I have been carrying a sarong, for sun exposure, clothing, and sit down, if necessary and when not in use, it cushions my shoulder under the bag strap. I wear a sun hat and footwear appropriate to conditions.

For shorter hikes, like out back in my Tortolitas, a water bottle and camera are good enough. Tweezers and car keys may end up in the camera bag.

I have a small gorilla pod that I have yet to use and I nearly always carry a camera for the necessary trip reports!

The ten essentials in detail: http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ten-essentials.html

If I had a wood out my door, I'd be enjoying the Hairless plan, nada. I did a short one in the forest, one morning last week and loved it.

Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on August 29, 2015, 12:30:02 AM
Quote
I was always taught that the color blue was the only color you won't find naturally in the woods
In April, in our local woods, almost the entire woodland floor is a mass of bluebells.  I can't think of anything else that's particularly blue in the woods but the bluebells are certainly an exception to that rule!

Thanks for the 10 lists Jbee, all very logical!

John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on August 29, 2015, 06:03:27 PM
From a distance a pine forest is very dark green, almost black.  Dark green pine needles mix with black bark and create a dark landscape.  Plants work hard to absorb every bit of sunshine they can absorb.  Any bright colored space stands out against the darkness.  That's why flowers are colored, to stand out.  Bright red/pink, bright yellow, bright blue, or white.  Any bright color that reflects rather than absorbing light is unnatural in a forest. 

A dark skin with midsummer tan would blend in quite well I said to myself yesterday as I walked near a stag in the forest.   

 
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: reubenT on August 30, 2015, 02:17:59 AM
The more wilderness skills and knowledge one has,  the less equipment is necessary.    But I think a little knife would be the last thing I'd let go of.    I like the swiss with the wood saw in it.    Then a firestarter like the metal match would be the second last thing I'd let go of.   Especially in the damp conditions we so often get in the SE.  A fire can be a lifesaver and it can be hard to find dry tinder.    Gettin lost or hurt is the least of my concerns.  Probably because I don't go out without a good map and keep track of where I am on it.   And I have a trust in divine power that's kept me safe through many an escapade for 50 years.   (around home the map is programmed in the brain)  I have to be amused at the idea of takin TP along.   It hasn't been around very long.   What-da ya think everybody did for thousands of years before?     I think they just used whatever happened to be handy.   My cousin (by marriage,  not actually related)  always takes TP with him.   And incidentally he grew up in town.   I think there's a connection.    I grew up with an outhouse for some years and plenty of woods to roam, and for some reason I don't consider TP a necessity at all when there's an unlimited supply of natural materials out there.  Dirt or sand if nothing else is around.   Going a little better prepared,  I'd take a small cup/kettle for cooking and eating wild greens,  and a tiny bottle of grapefruit seed extract.   Only takes 4 drops per gallon to kill all bad microorganisms in water. Whole lot lighter and smaller than a filter.      Then a sleepin bag and tarp (for rain) would have me just about enough for a multi day packing trip.   Maybe some grain flour to make paddies from those wild greens.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on August 30, 2015, 03:20:05 AM
The more wilderness skills and knowledge one has,  the less equipment is necessary.    But I think a little knife would be the last thing I'd let go of.    I like the swiss with the wood saw in it.   


I carry a swiss army knife with a cork screw.  Over 20 years the cork screw has, perhaps, been its most often used implement.  I bought it after one night at White Tail (nudist) Park in Virginia, USA, in a pouring down rain. My wife and I were staying dry in our tent with a bottle of wine and no opener.  That was almost 40 years ago.  I bought the Swiss Army knife shortly thereafter.


Quote
Then a firestarter like the metal match would be the second last thing I'd let go of.   Especially in the damp conditions we so often get in the SE.  A fire can be a lifesaver and it can be hard to find dry tinder.    Gettin lost or hurt is the least of my concerns.  Probably because I don't go out without a good map and keep track of where I am on it.   

I have never gotten lost in half a century of back country hiking before GPS.  I apparently have a good sense of direction and am able to use a few clues to check directions. 

Quote
And I have a trust in divine power that's kept me safe through many an escapade for 50 years.   (around home the map is programmed in the brain)  I have to be amused at the idea of takin TP along.   It hasn't been around very long.   What-da ya think everybody did for thousands of years before?     I think they just used whatever happened to be handy.   My cousin (by marriage,  not actually related)  always takes TP with him.   And incidentally he grew up in town.  I think there's a connection.    I grew up with an outhouse for some years and plenty of woods to roam, and for some reason I don't consider TP a necessity at all when there's an unlimited supply of natural materials out there.  Dirt or sand if nothing else is around.   

The purpose of TP is to protect your pants.   When you are naked your back side dries and the material flakes off, or in a rain washes off.  Naked humans lived happily for a million years without TP or a substitute, same as all our animal friends.  My backpack emergency kit does have some TP though, to protect my pants if I have to wear them.


 
Quote
Going a little better prepared,  I'd take a small cup/kettle for cooking and eating wild greens,  and a tiny bottle of grapefruit seed extract.   Only takes 4 drops per gallon to kill all bad microorganisms in water. Whole lot lighter and smaller than a filter.     

When I did a lot of back country hiking I carried a chlorine kit.  The water ended up tasting like city water, but it was safe to drink in about 10 minutes. Never tried the grapefruit extract.

Quote
Then a sleepin bag and tarp (for rain) would have me just about enough for a multi day packing trip.   Maybe some grain flour to make paddies from those wild greens.

When I was in the Explorer Scouts the group liked to hike with a used coffee can of rice and raisins which was enough food for several days.  Everything else fit into pockets.  Going naked I would have to carry a day pack for water and such. 

Bob
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 30, 2015, 10:49:43 AM
Desert resources are quite different than the forest back east that I grew up in. I could get by without the TP if there was a creek, or nice fat leaves. Many places require burying and I have had my nose offended many times by the gentle bouquet left from others. Depending on the season, a shallow burial is sufficient because wet things dry up and disappear in a couple days or a tad more. The stake that I dig with weights one ounce: http://www.rei.com/product/845328/rei-snow-stake

The small partial roll of TP is nothing to carry. There are no broad leaves here as most plants have small leaves for the heat. Then there is that thing about prickers and survival around here. Sticking sand up there to clean is funky. The grit stays, and you will end up with a disgusting hand. There are seldom creeks, or water and many, no...most of these are dangerous because of the cattle. The stuff doesn't just dry and flake off, it sticks around in the enclosed area. It is not inviting to my companion to smell that, nor to me when I squat, I smell myself. I don't like that. Most of the hunter gatherers around here lived near water sources and 95% (or 92, or 98%, I forget right now) of these are gone due to ground water wells for towns, but mostly cattle. It just ain't the same place, so here, we can't compare with the ancients. The natives, we are pretty sure, around here, were generally totally naked but for ornament, and reed huaraches. TP is little inconvenience compared to the alternatives, so carrying 25% or less of a roll is nothing. I'll stick with this luxury. In a more deciduous area, I see your point, but personally, I wouldn't use the leaf thing without a supplementary creek source to bathe. There is also my lack of familiarity with forest flora.

The TP is also for injury, cleaning, and a band-aide in conjunction with duct-tape, which has many other uses. It also helps with other orifices, like nose blowing. Girls like a wipe after a pee, too.

The water drops are something I carry backpacking as a supplement when the only water might be disgusting and use them after a filter.  with pills etc., you have to wait, most water is cleaned nearly as well with a filter, and chemicals taste crappy. I have a 10 ounce pump filter that I use for convenience, but I carry one of the newer Sawyer filters, which weights only 2 ounces and fits in my fist ($25): https://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

1974, I'm driving on a dirt road in the remote Sierra Nevada Mountains after dropping off a pal near his illicit pot farm. There in the middle of the road, I see a Swiss-like knife. I clean it up, fish scales and mud with a dab of rust and I have a great knife. I built a macrame strap on it, and still have it. I carried all over South America, a great knife. Just a piece of decor broken off when someone ran over it 40 some years ago when I rescued this friend. Like you, I'm sure I have used that cork screw more than any part of it. They are quickest to get to, they pry well, and then there was a whole lot of wine corks :)
Jbee



Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: balead on August 30, 2015, 02:16:16 PM
These tips on long hikes are all well and good, but I've never been on a hike long enough to need to carry anything. I don't regret that one bit - quality over quantity. Anything that needs to be carried spoils the experience of being naked and free. For me free range naturism is about enjoying areas close to home. Somewhere I can sunbathe and just "be" and to be able to walk around from there without the need to carry anything, and not always clothing. That is not to say that I don't take any accoutrements with me - they are left with the bike I use to get there.

When I first realised I wanted to be outside naked in the sun and air it would take me at least ten minutes to get the courage to take my clothes off in my chosen spot in a wood and even then I felt very conspicuous. Fast forward to today and my clothes are off within seconds of reaching my chosen spot and I feel confident and relaxed at being naked outside. Isn't that what this thread should be about? Encouraging "newbies" that it's easier and less dangerous than they might think. Perhaps it needs questions from them.

Things like where do you start getting used to being outside naked. I would suggest that a public wood is not the ideal place to start. A private preferably little used wood is better even though you are technically trespassing. Even if you do get caught out there it is unlikely to be taken any further. I know from experience! In fact it's probably better to start outside a wood where you are not going to be surprised easily or in large open spaces where anybody about can be seen from way off.

When you start free range naturism the last thing you want to do is go on a long hike! You need to learn that anybody walking in your area is going to be a lot less observant than you and you're likely to see them long before they see you - and even if they do see you it's unlikely to result in anything serious. In fact being relaxed yet alert is one of the great things about free range naturism because you are using all your senses as they were meant to be used.



Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on September 01, 2015, 01:49:54 AM
I like what Balead is saying here, but perhaps we should have named it "ALL things Crafty." I drive to more remote naked, I hike from there naked with essential equipment and I then park the equipment once arriving in a suitable location. The whole idea with the ultralight backpacking is not to just backpack, but get to fantastic natural remote areas and stay free. Maybe day hiking from there. Each step of the way is best without clothing, the best of it without equipment is better still.

If everything is better naked, then we have to include the craft in more everyday, locations, and situations. Even around the home, where many begin.
Jbee   
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: reubenT on September 02, 2015, 06:23:21 PM
   I have never used the cork screw on my knife.     The reamer gets use drilling holes occasionally.  I about need a new one,  as it's seen some 25 years of constant use and getting rough,  lost both plastic sides and broke some of it's useful accessories.    What gear is necessary and what's just for convenience is up to individual feelings.   Ultimately nothing is necessary in moderate conditions.   But without skill or in bad conditions it can be hard or impossible with nothing.  And a few accessories for convenience or comfort is fine.   I don't understand the aspect of carrying an 80-100 lb pack loaded with more convenience items than necessities.   Long ago that was the norm.   They thought an axe was critical,  as was a cast iron frying pan.  Maybe even a camp chair.       Tom Brown,  the survivalist of new jersey who was trained by an old indian medicine man,  the grandfather of his friend.    On his own he walked off into the New Jersey wild land leaving everything behind,  including clothes.  And stayed a year.    That's the ultimate.   It's nice to have those skills,  but I'm not called to do it.   Just reading his books is a pretty good education.   Gotta get out and do a few things to get some skills.    Like building a fire.   It can be tricky even with the metal match in damp conditions. 
   Even with Tom Brown,  divine intervention was obvious once.      He was camped out in his bed roll under a tree once.    Got to feeling quite uneasy about something, he didn't know what.   He ended up climbing the tree and tying himself in place so he could doze without falling.  (something he'd figured out how to do,  since wild dogs could be a real menace in those times.)
In the morning he found a branch had fallen and speared his bed. 
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Peter S on September 02, 2015, 06:45:17 PM
A few years ago on a visit to Switzerland I saw a shop window display of various Swiss Army Knives. I know the Swiss use different languages depending which part of the country it is, but I was still surprised to see that the Swiss for Swiss Army knife is ... "Swiss Army Knife"

peter
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on September 09, 2015, 09:59:48 PM
Quote from: John
To assume makes...etc!  No, Duane you can't assume that.
errr . . . You are right. I have made an as...??, ummmm . . . whatever!

The 10 essentials is a list of items to have when hiking, especially in remote or backcountry trails. There is an article on the
REI website (http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ten-essentials.html) that discusses the list and other information for hikers. This is something we taught Scouts when doing any kind of hike, short or long. Ideally you would be with a buddy, but if not these make survival more likely.

Most any hiking website or manual will have this list or one very similar, as seen here (http://www.mountaineersbooks.org/assets/clientpages/zz_tenessentials.aspx). The important thing is to concentrate on the basic list and think about where you will be. Weather affect the list also.

There is an updated one for those with high tech gear, or if you are traditional you can use the old one from the '30's. These are basics and of course you can modify it based on whether you are going on a unique trip.

With regard to the inclusion of TP. As Jbee said it can be used for other things besides it's intended use. I prefer wet wipes that are intended for infants. The package does weigh more than TP but it too has mutiple uses, e.g. cleaning your hands, and is more comapct. The idea is choose smart and try to make an item have multiple uses. That reduces overall weight.


Quote from: balead
Isn't that what this thread should be about? Encouraging "newbies" that it's easier and less dangerous than they might think. Perhaps it needs questions from them.

One of my wife's sayings is, "Wouldn't the world be a boring place if we were all the same", something I remind her of on occasion. Not all will want to practice their hiking the same way, so all advice is valuable. Let the reader pick and choose. Those that wish to do small walks and those that want a long hiking experience can find help here. When I was a kid a did my 1st outdoor naked ramblings. It was in a private wood and it made the initial forays much easier. Had I been living here as a kid, I would have had to use a different venue. There are no woods around here. Scootin' out into the desert would have had to suffice. Remote and/or seldom traveled would be more appropriate where the likelyhood of being caught is less. Whatever works best.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on September 10, 2015, 03:38:39 PM
My day pack always has my "emergency" kit with some basic first aid items, TP, candle, lighter, small flashlight, compass, string, etc.  If the hike is longer than half a mile I take the pack to carry water or equal, camera, and a small towel.  In the past few years I added a GPS.  Often I carry over only one shoulder and then the other to minimize tan lines.  I have used the flashlight on a trail when I didn't get back by dark. 

My pack doesn't include "cover up" clothes. In most places I just leave my clothes behind unless I may not come out of the woods where I went in and left my clothes. 
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on September 14, 2015, 01:32:55 AM
I'm assuming TP is toilet paper rather than tarpaulin or is it something else?

John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on September 14, 2015, 08:56:55 AM
Up. Toilet paper. If you have ever forgotten it at home, going without is a traumatic memory.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Kayaker on February 19, 2016, 04:07:48 AM
I see there are no female hiker comments here just yet.  We carry an interesting array of materials which are mostly left in the vehicle but are, nonetheless, available.  The  most important items for a day hike from the ladies perspective (non girly girl) would be a wee wad of tissue, water, sunscreen, a lightweight long sleeve shirt, sunglasses, comfortable back pack, snacks,  and a hat. Maybe bug spray depending on locale.  For Spartan hikes less than four hours that reduces to hat and sunglasses. For a Girly girl... Well there wouldn't be any hike unless there was a gift shop involved and an elevator.

That being said - one can expect a vast assortment of flashlights, electric matchsticks, pocket knives, collapsing eating utensils, towels, soaps, cooking pots, luxury alcoholic beverages, toothbrushes, hair scrunchies, snack foods, aspirin, band aids, maps, emergency phone numbers, calamine, several pairs of shoes, aloe Vera..cameras.. All in a tidy duffel or two or four back in the car.... Naturally.   You know, the Hiking closet.  :)
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on February 19, 2016, 10:54:32 PM
Yes Kayaker Lisa,

Familiar picture in some respects!  I'm finding that the trunk (boot) of my car is gradually beginning to fill with hiking paraphernalia, such as walking poles, towel & clean up gear, spare shoes, rucksack and the like.  I don't hike for very long (an hour or two) typically but I'm quite pleased to recognise this accumulation - it means I'm getting out and about more!

Not that I've done much this week - spent much of it in central London on business and even going back tomorrow on more!  I hope as the weather warms up I'll be at home more and able to take to the fields and hillocks.

John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Kayaker on March 21, 2016, 10:46:23 PM
Tanman is happily free ranging pert near every day all day.  We've had an early spring after a very wet winter and he's off into the sun every second its up.  He's happy. Loves his sun.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on April 28, 2016, 07:36:41 PM
I live in a desert. Water is a big deal.  Where I grew up in East Texas lack of water was not a concern. Snakes were. As a kid I saw 'em all the time. Good ones and bad ones. Mosquitos can be the most important thing on your mind depending on where you are.

Out here, if you are on a hike by yourself, a turned ankle can be a death sentence in the summer. You bring what is needed for the place you hike in.

Nothing wrong with being prepared.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: reubenT on July 21, 2016, 05:16:34 AM
Up. Toilet paper. If you have ever forgotten it at home, going without is a traumatic memory.
Jbee

Like you says,  everybody is different.    The need for TP is one I fail to understand.   It's a very recent invention, what did everybody use for the thousands of years before?  I just use whatever's at hand that's loose.   Usually dead leaves from the forest here in eastern woodland.  But otherwise I've used rocks, sticks, dirt, sand,  snow, moss, soft grass, (have to be careful of the grass with sharp edges, it can cut)  and of course water whenever it's available.   And water between everything else to stay clean as possible.     My cousin who lives with us has to have his TP,  carries it along everywhere when going out.  I don't even use it at home since the woods is close at hand,   bury my bank deposit under the forest litter like a cat and step it flat so it's well exposed to the soil microbial life.  Makes it disappear so one can walk past and even step on it without knowing it's there.   In the desert sand and rocks may be all there is.   I've left my deposit under a loose rock,   used a smooth rock to clean with,  or a handful of scrub leaves,  or a wad of dry grass,  or handfuls of sand. 
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: ric on July 21, 2016, 03:07:20 PM
we were baby sitting the grandkids yesterday , hottest day of the year so far, spent most of the day in the garden in the shade of a hazlenut bush,   toddler had a snotty nose, should have seen the look on the wifes face when i wiped the kids nose with a leaf.
(hazlenut leaves are the size of the palm of a large hand)


why is socially acceptable for the toddlers to spend all day in their birthday suits, but ive got to wear shorts?

mind you we dissobeyed the instructions to smother them in sun cream, just kept them amused in the cool shade.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on July 21, 2016, 05:29:51 PM
Quote from: ric
why is socially acceptable for the toddlers to spend all day in their birthday suits, but ive got to wear shorts?

The clue to the answer is in the word you used, "socially".  Society imposes a large list of behaviors on us by the time we attain our "majority". At that point you are free to discard as many as you choose. Just make sure you are able to endure the inevitable reactions.

At the root is most likely a fear of losing control of the status quo.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on July 21, 2016, 05:56:56 PM
Quote from: Reuben
The need for TP is one I fail to understand.   It's a very recent invention, what did everybody use for the thousands of years before?  I just use whatever's at hand that's loose.   Usually dead leaves from the forest here in eastern woodland.

Mostly it's just easy and convenient.

When I was a kid we spent most of our summer days in the woods. Generally I took care of that issue :) before I left the house. Sometimes the call came and you just took care of business. Grab a large stick, dig a hole and make a deposit. Grab a handful of duff (that layer of dead leafy material on the forest floor) or a large leaf, being careful in the choice, and there is no need to carry anything.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on July 21, 2016, 08:03:53 PM
Quote from: ric
why is socially acceptable for the toddlers to spend all day in their birthday suits, but ive got to wear shorts?

The clue to the answer is in the word you used, "socially".  Society imposes a large list of behaviors on us by the time we attain our "majority". At that point you are free to discard as many as you choose. Just make sure you are able to endure the inevitable reactions.

At the root is most likely a fear of losing control of the status quo.

Duane
Seems to be a difference between a peepee and a sex organ. One is harmless. Yep, seems to be kinda goofy thinking to me, too.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on July 21, 2016, 08:07:44 PM
Quote from: Reuben
The need for TP is one I fail to understand.   It's a very recent invention, what did everybody use for the thousands of years before?  I just use whatever's at hand that's loose.   Usually dead leaves from the forest here in eastern woodland.

Mostly it's just easy and convenient.

When I was a kid we spent most of our summer days in the woods. Generally I took care of that issue :) before I left the house. Sometimes the call came and you just took care of business. Grab a large stick, dig a hole and make a deposit. Grab a handful of duff (that layer of dead leafy material on the forest floor) or a large leaf, being careful in the choice, and there is no need to carry anything.

Duane
I can't think of a single thing on this desert that would not be abrasive and inefficient and it is also a poor use of precious drinking water. When I was a kid, back east, nature had many answers, but I only used them in a pinch...messy for the inexperienced.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on July 21, 2016, 10:14:29 PM

Caution --  Frank discussion of body functions.  Skip if you don't want to read.

The need for TP is one I fail to understand.   It's a very recent invention, what did everybody use for the thousands of years before?  I just use whatever's at hand that's loose.   Usually dead leaves from the forest here in eastern woodland.


You are right that TP is a modern invention.  TP was invented in the 20th century.  Prior to its invention people used corn cobs, pages from the Sears catalogue, or whatever.  The most common was nothing at all -- like other animals. 

When people are naked any residual matter quickly dries.  Rubbing of our behinds together as we walk causes it to flake off without a problem.  Its a little more messy if you have "the runs," but the result is the same.  Within a few minutes its mostly gone by itself. 

That worked well when our ancestors lived mostly outside in the forest or plains.  Its not so good in houses, and if you wear pants it makes your pants messy.  But billions of humans still just go out to a field and squat.    India has a campaign to convert its billion people to indoor plumbing without success.   Middle eastern immigrants coming to Europe are also often unfamiliar with indoor plumbing.

When we westerners are out in the woods naked I'm not sure we need TP either, nor leaves and duff.  It dries. It flakes off rapidly.  When naked we can easily return to natural (animal) behavior in the woods.   As an old saying goes, "Do bears shit in the woods?"   (I don't know if that's an American saying,) 

My backpack has a small supply of TP in my kit.  I suppose its left over from days when I was Scoutmaster leading clothed boys, or hiking with other textile oriented people.  TP helps a lot when you have been a little messy and then have to put pants back on.  When you are hiking naked, it doesn't matter. 

I read that the Roman Empire had public toilets at their "baths" which included running water and a sponge on a stick to wash.  In my opinion that was a lot more clean than wiping with paper.  At home I have a bidet with a warm water wash.  My opinion is that every home or public toilet facility should have warm water wash for personal cleanliness. 

I hike naked on my land all the time without taking any kit.  When hiking naked TP isn't needed and it doesn't matter, in my experience.  I wash more when I get home.


 
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: JOhnGw on July 22, 2016, 08:44:38 AM
In the natural squat position there is almost no residue outside the anal passage, even with the "runs." It is the use of the toilet seat which causes the bottom cheeks to close in and accumulate unwanted residue.
In my opinion the WC and the seated earth closet have a lot to answer for - the squatting pole over an earth closet or the French "hole in the floor" toilet are far better both hygienically and anatomically.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: ric on July 22, 2016, 09:11:15 AM
humans are the only animal that uses tp , were also the only one that cooks its food ,   is there a connection?


what we eat does effect the the condition of the stool, maybe the crap that most people now eat makes there own crap more messy than it would be on a more natural diet.

on a similar vein do all the chemicals in processed food come out in sweat and make that smell bad as well?


Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: MartinM on July 22, 2016, 09:36:16 AM
We are the only species with the technology foe either. That said, as a species we have cooked our food for tens of thousands of years, whereas toilet paper was only recently invented, as was modern underwear. The latter is a more relevant connection, and sheeted beds which become obviously soiled.

Off track, I use leaves, moss, grass and water. I only use toilet paper as a last resort. The 'sharp edged' grass sounds more like sedges. Uncomfortable!
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on July 22, 2016, 05:12:03 PM
humans are the only animal that uses tp , were also the only one that cooks its food ,   is there a connection?

No connection.   We've been eating cooked food for about 2 million years.  Our jaw and facial muscles have evolved smaller than our primate cousins who eat raw food.  Our digestive tract is now about 25% smaller in proportion to our body mass. 

If a person eats raw food you now only can absorb around 70% (more or less) of its food value so a lot of undigested raw food will pass through without being absorbed.  As a species we no longer have the guts to make efficient use of raw food.  The undigested raw material would affect your waste stream.

We have only been using TP for less than 100 years, not an evolutionary item yet.  No relation to our 2 million years of evolution for cooked food.



Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on July 22, 2016, 05:24:43 PM
In the natural squat position there is almost no residue outside the anal passage, even with the "runs." It is the use of the toilet seat which causes the bottom cheeks to close in and accumulate unwanted residue.

Good point John.  I have seen advertisements for a foot rest designed to fit in front of a toilet.  It raises one's feet into more of a squatting position.  It is said to pull one's leg muscles out of the way for easier passage of waste inside.  They don't advertise that it is also cleaner outside but that is obvious too.


Quote
In my opinion the WC and the seated earth closet have a lot to answer for - the squatting pole over an earth closet or the French "hole in the floor" toilet are far better both hygienically and anatomically.

As a large fellow with bad knees I have problems doing an actual squat.  I'm going with the raised foot toilet.   
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on July 22, 2016, 06:21:21 PM
humans are the only animal that uses tp , were also the only one that cooks its food ,   is there a connection?


what we eat does effect the the condition of the stool, maybe the crap that most people now eat makes there own crap more messy than it would be on a more natural diet.

on a similar vein do all the chemicals in processed food come out in sweat and make that smell bad as well?
Okay, more leafy vegetable matter, and squatting do make an highly significant difference and these two have been lost to us. In my experience (oh perish the image of it), it has been night and day dramatically different.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on July 22, 2016, 06:46:52 PM
humans are the only animal that uses tp , were also the only one that cooks its food ,   is there a connection?

No connection.   We've been eating cooked food for about 2 million years.  Our jaw and facial muscles have evolved smaller than our primate cousins who eat raw food.  Our digestive tract is now about 25% smaller in proportion to our body mass. 

If a person eats raw food you now only can absorb around 70% (more or less) of its food value so a lot of undigested raw food will pass through without being absorbed.  As a species we no longer have the guts to make efficient use of raw food.  The undigested raw material would affect your waste stream.

We have only been using TP for less than 100 years, not an evolutionary item yet.  No relation to our 2 million years of evolution for cooked food.
It is probably best to avoid a raw food discussion, but raw works very well, with modern food processors, it passes beautifully, relaxes the digestive system to better efficiency and health. Our species has always eaten lots of uncooked food as well as cooked. Most food's enriching qualities are mostly lost (70% give or take) when cooked, sat around for days, not chewed enough, or produced with the impotent soils that need chemicals to produce produce in. Not as much food is needed, or desired because nutrients are absorbed at a higher rate. Not just reading this, my experiential use of raw has shown these to me in a slap in the face obvious way.

We eat chewy dehydrated foods on the trail. There is plenty, actually more according to my reading, of protein, etc. and satisfaction in it. The latrine squat is more convenient. The way that I make the food, it packs lighter, and gives more healthy energy. It also packs better in a squat.

The Squatty Potty showed me in a similarly dramatic way the value in squatting. The advert is hilarious! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbYWhdLO43Q
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Alf on July 23, 2016, 03:25:01 PM
This whole discussion has avoided the obvious point: "why organized nudists need towels". Seriously, I hate to carry a towel and it is solely to be used to keep a seat clean from our possible dirty asses. The towel is a symbol that we shouldn't be naked. Alternatively, if we are clean, no towel or "towel shame" is needed. Therefore, the art of free range naturism requires some hygiene practices. I always wash myself after defecating. In my ramblings, there is always a river, creek, shoreline, garden hose, or even a shower stall somewhere nearby. So squat (squatting is best), wipe, wash, and then I'll proudly sit any damn place I choose, and without the naturist's flag --the standard white towel.

../Alf
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on July 23, 2016, 11:04:27 PM
I disperse towel hassle, but prefer it to sitting on funky cold surfaces where there are lots of people of various hygienic habits. If there is a swimming pool, no worries.

Hiking around here, you might surmise, often does not include a place to wash. Drinking water is heavy and precious to carry. We keep towelettes, and baby butt wipes in the bag, just in case. We also wash our hands with them before eating food. Me when their dirty, DF everytime.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on July 24, 2016, 05:14:27 PM
This whole discussion has avoided the obvious point: "why organized nudists need towels". Seriously, I hate to carry a towel and it is solely to be used to keep a seat clean from our possible dirty asses. The towel is a symbol that we shouldn't be naked.
../Alf


What Alf said!  The whole "carry a towel" shtick is an assertion that humans are too "dirty" to be naked.   I find it offensive and insulting.

Someone pointed out that kilt and skirt people have been sitting their bare asses on public places for hundreds of years, and nobody says "boo."  I guess if someone's behind isn't visible then he or she is not "dirty."   

I wash myself and sit where I like.  I don't carry a towel, and I'm not "dirty."

Bob

Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on July 25, 2016, 08:27:47 PM
To quote Groucho, "The contrary is also true."

I get the impression that most of us don't like carrying a towel. We know the necessity of maintaining good hygiene. We don't need a towel for those reasons.

When walking in the desert, I always carry something I can sit on if need be. Between the heat and the sharp environment, I have nothing to prove to anyone. I also do not believe for a moment that everyone around me is as diligent as I, and those here, about hygiene. If I am carrying a towel and it's not the desert, it is more for me than those around me. I don't trust 'em.

Whenever I sit on the chairs or the sofa without one, I get that look from my wife. I know there is no problem, and I also know I don't want to fight that battle daily. It's the gesture. I have no interest in being the manners or etiquette monitor for everyone. I have neither the time nor the patience.

At the end of my day, it's whether I was comfortable and enjoyed the naked time I had.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: ric on July 26, 2016, 02:22:11 PM
when im sat on a clients rideon lawn mower i sit on my shirt,  after an hours mowing yesterday on some rather undulating ground with both up and down and side slopes  i did have a small brown mark on my shirt, to me sitting on summit on someone elses seat is no big deal, it shows to them that you are respectful of their perceptions , when im working naked for a non naturist i dont want to give them any perceived , real or imaginary negatives.



and i dont like sitting on black plastic seats in sunshine
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Alf on July 27, 2016, 03:48:00 AM
I'm proud of you All!

Cheers,

Alf
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 01, 2016, 09:04:34 AM
To quote Groucho, "The contrary is also true."

I get the impression that most of us don't like carrying a towel. We know the necessity of maintaining good hygiene. We don't need a towel for those reasons.

When walking in the desert, I always carry something I can sit on if need be. Between the heat and the sharp environment, I have nothing to prove to anyone. I also do not believe for a moment that everyone around me is as diligent as I, and those here, about hygiene. If I am carrying a towel and it's not the desert, it is more for me than those around me. I don't trust 'em.

Whenever I sit on the chairs or the sofa without one, I get that look from my wife. I know there is no problem, and I also know I don't want to fight that battle daily. It's the gesture. I have no interest in being the manners or etiquette monitor for everyone. I have neither the time nor the patience.

At the end of my day, it's whether I was comfortable and enjoyed the naked time I had.

Duane
I carry a piece of cloth for that reason, too. I carry it under the water bottle strap or pack strap, or camera strap for extra cushioning. I also use it when I begin to realize that I have too much sun on my shoulders. It keeps the minute ants off of a butt to sit on something that sets them apart instead of thick grass. Rock do h get extremely dangerously hot and insulation is a good protection.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on August 07, 2016, 07:22:27 PM
Topic drift really, but re Alf's remark,
Quote
So squat (squatting is best),
I couldn't help but dash off some evangelical enthusiasm for squatting.  Gosh I've had a great deal of benefit since I discovered squatting!  Revolutionised my ano-rectal health i.e. no more piles! and changed the speed, quality, effectiveness, completeness and cleanliness of evacuation all for the better.  Why hasn't the entire so called civilised world reverted to squatting - it IS the natural way.
John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 08, 2016, 06:07:38 AM
Slowly and assuredly, we shall endeavor, one smile with an attached butt on the other end at a time. Progress is being made, especially since the silly advert went viral a few times.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on August 09, 2016, 07:57:33 PM
Quote from: Alf
So squat (squatting is best),

Having had to do this more than once, I concur. I do recommend doing so naked, or at least without pants, even if you are hiking fully clothed. There is zero chance of making the the act a wasted effort at avoiding an accident.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on August 18, 2016, 11:26:03 PM
Quote from: eyesup
I do recommend doing so naked, or at least without pants

I certainly would not recommend doing it WITH pants! :D :D

John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on August 18, 2016, 11:43:06 PM
This thread has gotten...
Well, what about a skirt, or kilt thing? Do you bundle it up above the waist, or let it delicately drape down covering the nasty process, or what? How is that done where the kilt originated, or has been in practical use for generations? I once saw a Bolivian Native woman squat in her billowing shirt and petticoats next to the curb at market. No exposure, no mind, just a curious stream running down the gutter.

Gentlemen, I'm not sure what waters we have topic drifted into.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on August 19, 2016, 01:38:37 AM
Yes, John, with pants would be a bad idea unless maybe you are in a pack-it-in-pack-it-out area.  :(

I learned long ago to not risk getting anything on my clothes as a result of a lack of attention. If I'm not already naked I will at least get rid of all the pants. (in the UK pants are underwear and in America trousers are pants) Confused yet?

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: midnightrider on April 17, 2017, 08:45:41 AM
Hi guys, I am still with you ;-)  Interesting discussion, the towel is indeed a typical item for naturists. I think it is not always necessary from hygienic point of view but also to dispel prejudices on bare life.
There are so many reasons to have a towel with you and use it or not. I personally think it is always a pleasant idea to use a towel for sitting down on  when being out somewhere  in nature.

Cheers,
Paul
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: JOhnGw on April 17, 2017, 09:10:23 AM
I take the opposeite view and rarely use a sitting cloth in a natural environment.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on April 17, 2017, 03:26:50 PM
I take the opposeite view and rarely use a sitting cloth in a natural environment.

I'm with JohnGw.  My naturist photos don't show me carrying a towel or cloth to sit on.   
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: JOhnGw on April 17, 2017, 05:40:10 PM
I take the opposeite view and rarely use a sitting cloth in a natural environment.

I'm with JohnGw.  My naturist photos don't show me carrying a towel or cloth to sit on.
I ought to add that I do use a sitting cloth where appropriate.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on April 26, 2017, 05:27:37 PM
May 25th is approaching!
What, you may ask, is so special about May 25th?

Every year on May 25, Towel Day (https://www.rt.com/viral/344345-dont-panic-hitchiker-towelday/) is celebrated as a tribute to Douglas Adams, author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
Just remember!
(https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2843/34035389091_32579eb6a5_m.jpg)

Why a towel? “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to The Galaxy” (http://hitchhikersguidetoearth.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page) (Earth Edition) says that, a towel is the, ”most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have” (http://hitchhikers.wikia.com/wiki/Towel), providing warmth and warding off the galaxy's "noxious fumes".

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. What the non-hitchhiker will think is that any man that can hitch the length and breadth of the Galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through and still know where his towel is, is clearly a man to be reckoned with.

Quote
If you want to survive out here, you've got to know where your towel is. - Ford Prefect

Some uses for towels are listed here (https://www.h2g2.com/entry/A667253) with a significant one being #22. I have in one way or other found numbers 5, 11, 21, 23, 24, 36 and 44 as regular uses for a towel. As you can see, a towel is indispensable. It’s like a multi-use tool.

To paraphrase the narrator:
Quote
"The problem," it says, "is that space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mindbogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space . . .”, etc. etc.

Everyone has rules about behavior. Whether it’s about carrying a towel or dietary norms in the outer reaches of the galaxy, keeping track of all the rules; social, legal, cultural, religious, foreign or domestic is a huge pain.

There is simply too much to remember. Too much to think about.
I think that the chances of finding out what's actually going on are so absurdly remote that the only thing to do is to say, "Hang the sense of it," and keep yourself busy. I'd much rather be happy than right any day. – Slartibartfast

So, try to not worry about it and just grab your towel. It will come in handy, see #13, and be happy.
Oh and, Don't Panic!

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on April 26, 2017, 05:57:00 PM
Its almost Towel Day.  Hooray!

Reading the linked article on uses for a towel, I didn't see anything mentioned about sitting on your towel. 



(http://photos.bradkemp.com/towel day.jpg)


While on the subject of hitchhiking the galaxy, I learned recently that 42 is the universal answer to life, the universe and everything because 42 is the ASCI code for * and therefore is used by geek programmers to substitute for anything you want it to mean.  Took me decades to find that out.  Not very quick. 



Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on April 26, 2017, 07:02:02 PM
The Andean Indians use a wool small blanket to carry loads on their backs, kind of a backpack. It is used like a towel. It is a place to haul babies around. It is called a manta. One more use for a towel.

A towel keeps the sunburn off of the shoulders. As a pack it keeps food and belongings together. It can be slung over one shoulder, held around the neck, draped across the forehead, or used like a basket.

It is a great headscarf. I believe that a piece of material was the first clothing to wrap over a body. A good idea gone wrong and misused.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on April 27, 2017, 07:11:15 PM
Quote from: Bob
Reading the linked article on uses for a towel, I didn't see anything mentioned about sitting on your towel.
(from the above post) Some uses for towels are listed here (https://www.h2g2.com/entry/A667253) with a significant one being #22.

On that site, see:
22. Use it to sit on in a naturist camp (this is a real use and a demonstration of naturist etiquette).
Bob, I know you don't, but it is mentioned. :D

Quote from: Bob
While on the subject of hitchhiking the galaxy, I learned recently that 42 is the universal answer to life, the universe and everything because 42 is the ASCI code for * and therefore is used by geek programmers to substitute for anything you want it to mean.

There is a web site called PI Day. On it see,
A Couple Weird Things about Pi (http://www.piday.org/2013/a-couple-weird-things-about-pi/)
On the site find this sentence; "And now, something for you hackers out there: 3.14159 × 1337% = 42"
and click on 1337% and/or 42. You will see many odd coincidences with Pi and 42 et.al.

So on the date, 3.14.15 at 9:26:53.589 a big celebration took place.

There are many people out there with too much time on their hands. Oh my, me too!

Duane


Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on April 27, 2017, 08:46:21 PM
Excellent list! However it is lacking. We use a towel to circulate the hot air in the sauna, Turkish style. It changes out the tendency for different temperatures to layer, simply by a propeller-like motion. This also can fan the hot air at a body concentrating like a blow dryer. The fan application can also be used by using the towel as, well, as a fan on a hot day.

If each person has their own towel then a multitude of contrivances can be invented in combination.
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on April 27, 2017, 08:52:36 PM
Jbee, I believe I saw a place on that site to send in additions to the list.

Gofrit!

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on April 27, 2017, 09:05:30 PM
Well, Douglas Adams left us at only 49 yrs. old. Having a man like that to remind us that we shouldn’t get too wrapped up in our own importance is as important as taking serious, our obligations.

Just re-read my towel post and what Slartibartfast said.

He seemed to take particular enjoyment in lobbing designer petards to see if anyone would jump on them.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Kayaker2 on April 27, 2017, 09:46:26 PM
National towel day... that's fun.  I enjoyed the list too and have a few more handy purposes I've used them for, including discretely disrobing in public.  I probably use #11 and I guess an all around admission to #13 as I carry a towel with me in the car at all times.. more than one actually, different sizes.  And I have my favorites - not just ANY towel will do.

The author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance also passed on recently too.  I wonder if there will be a remembrance effort galactically in tribute.  I always liked that book.

“The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on April 28, 2017, 12:07:21 AM
Quote from: Bob
Reading the linked article on uses for a towel, I didn't see anything mentioned about sitting on your towel.
(from the above post) Some uses for towels are listed here (https://www.h2g2.com/entry/A667253) with a significant one being #22.

Duane


I didn't see that #22.  I ended up on the other page with the meme copied above.


Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jaybirdsen on March 12, 2018, 11:25:57 PM
Thanks for the Reddington report.  Still on my list.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on March 13, 2018, 06:45:45 AM
Speaking of. Wednesday is Pi Day!

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on March 13, 2018, 07:24:15 PM
I have a calendar that tells me all of these special days. Looking it over in advance, most of it is just kinda irrelevant. The only relevant information is that Easter and April Fools day are the same this year. :-X
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: BlueTrain on March 15, 2018, 11:27:09 AM
Not for my Serbian Orthodox relative, it isn't.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on March 15, 2018, 06:41:07 PM
I'm sorry that Siberian Orthodox don't have April Fool's Day. It is soo much fun!
Jbee :o ??? ::)
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: BlueTrain on March 15, 2018, 08:02:36 PM
Serbian, not Siberian. Big difference.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on March 15, 2018, 08:25:31 PM
But neither celebrate April Fools Day.
Jbee ;D ::)
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: BlueTrain on March 16, 2018, 11:04:56 AM
Neither do I.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on March 16, 2018, 07:53:55 PM
Yes, but you could come up with some creative April Fools Day pranks in Siberia.  :o

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on March 16, 2018, 10:26:43 PM
Don't we have a cohort in that neck of the woods? Croatia, Romania, owns a very fine naturist retreat in the hills?
Jbee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: eyesup on March 20, 2018, 09:57:41 PM
Wouldn't a Siberian Orthodox itself be an April Fools joke?

I have a friend from college that got married on April 1st.
I asked her about that and she said, "No, that was intentional!"  :o ;D
It was appropriate to her personality. Fun to be around.

Duane
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on June 28, 2019, 04:25:43 PM
Nude in the UK explained.  As usual, its clear as mud.  It's not illegal to be naked, but neither is police/government harassment. 

https://inews.co.uk/light-relief/offbeat/naked-public-topless-legal-uk-laws-top-off-summer-weather-heatwave/
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Peter S on June 28, 2019, 05:28:10 PM
The official police guidance (though not necessarily the press guidance...) is quite clear that as long as what you are doing is not illegal (eg breaking the speed limit, robbing a bank, etc) then doing it naked is not illegal. As this is a remote corner of the legal manual, and not often encountered by the average copper, the police do not always know this and so are liable to react wrongly if they are first on the scene. If a member of the public is "first responder" and calls the police, the call centre should be well enough informed to deflect the call.

But of course there is the law, as written, and there is the "law" as in what is socially acceptable, and for some people the public nakedness of others is just that, and it's difficult to enjoy the heatwave pleasure of nakedness while being berated by some outraged passerby. Thus most of us prefer to do out free-ranging out on the range (or in the woods) rather than in the park or down the high street - legal and undisturbed.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: BlueTrain on June 28, 2019, 05:55:51 PM
It could be worse and sometimes is. Policemen are not lawyers, nor are they hired gunfighters. There are always exceptions, of course, mostly in people's minds. A policeman's job is made difficult in that they exist within a world of expectations that does not necessarily conform to the written law, although parts of the law are quite elastic and can be stretched to fit most any circumstance. It's easy to see how laws about "disturbing the peace," "resisting arrest," and "vagrancy" can be overused. On the other side of the coin, there are plenty of people, as just mentioned, who want the police to do even more than they do or are authorized to do, for one reason or another--but not to them. Essentially, it's like people want some laws enforced very strictly but others not at all (like speed limits). In other words, some people believe very strongly in the law but only as if they wrote all the laws themselves.

But as has been said, there must be order: da muss Ordnung sein!
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Hymie on August 31, 2019, 03:30:56 PM
Case in point:

I remember a masonry subcontractor who wanted the general contractor to make a road for his equipment to navigate to stock his scaffolds. When the general refused the sub called OSHA claiming this was a safety violation by the general. OSHA arrived and, instead of fining the general for the muddy road, they finned the masonry sub for unsafe scaffolds.

Sometimes it is good to view things from more than your own perspective.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on September 04, 2019, 10:01:03 PM

Errr...well, Hymie, I agree totally with your conclusion but, pardon my obtuseness, but I don't see what it is we have to view from all angles, despite your obviously didactic anecdote.
Slightly puzzled.
John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on September 05, 2019, 08:56:05 PM
It makes more sense to me if the two paragraphs are separated, just a tad. The first is an anecdote about selective law enforcement. The last paragraph/line was an addendum, but still wise and about the first.

It is a sort of clean up your own side of the street first, a blame thing, I think. OR maybe not.

Now then, has my perspective made it clear as mud?

The sub has ultimate responsibility for his scaffolding and can't be ill equipped? The general needed the work done, so he needed to bend, but didn't? The inspector had a better relationship, or got paid off by the general? The sub got contracted by the general and is biting the hand that feeds him? The general is forcing the sub to set up in circumstance that makes the scaffolding dangerous, or inadequate scaffolding and there was no way around it but the extra road work? The General was too cheap to pay for the road? Both parties are in a spat and the inspector walks into it? Inspectors are a goofy, moody, and an insecure lot, that make decisions based on what they see and to keep them out of their own liabilities. He doesn't see the road problem, or the cause, he only sees that the scaffolding is dangerous? The sub should know better than to invite a bureaucrat into anything. The sub should have seen it coming and have had it written into the contract beforehand?

I dunno, but the comment makes sense to me.
Jbee ???
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on September 06, 2019, 11:15:06 PM

 :o
John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on September 08, 2019, 02:07:14 AM
 ;D ;D ;D
Jbeee
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Hymie on September 10, 2019, 03:15:17 AM
My point was that usually when you point the finger of blame and try to get someone in trouble, you have more blame than you are pointing out.

Those adamantly apposed to something like nudity, usually have a problem with their own sexual urges. So they think that anyone nude must be sexually perverse.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on September 10, 2019, 11:10:35 PM

Oh I see!  Got it now.  Sorry.  Was a bit obtuse!
"People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones" is my usual way of expressing that sort of thing :)
Or perhaps "Methinks he doth protest too much" as Shakespeare had it (i.e. protesting to hide one's own shortcomings).


John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Hymie on September 11, 2019, 05:17:40 AM
yep.
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: Bob Knows on December 03, 2020, 09:19:51 PM
Those adamantly apposed to something like nudity, usually have a problem with their own sexual urges. So they think that anyone nude must be sexually perverse.


Yes, and those who adamantly oppose something like sexual urges usually have a problem with their own sexual urges. 

Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on December 04, 2020, 06:35:37 PM
Adjusting and accepting bodily urges, needs and maintenance would come under the heading of "body acceptance", which is a key piece of tenant of the naturist society and free-beachers and most nudist. The usual idea is that when you get nude around others, you tend to be less concerned with appearances, all the flaws are out there, you just naturally must be yourself. It is more a body image issue. It is a canceling out of a fantasy image, or stereotypical image.

Accepting urges and dealing with them, is necessary, like urination, or erection, but in a practical manner. Repression can get quite constricting and outward manifests can get out of hand like a pressure cooker.

I read back several posts and I'm not sure what this thread is about anymore, but I'll take a stab at what I just read in the last couple of posts, most of which are from more than a year ago.
Jbee :o
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: nuduke on December 04, 2020, 11:10:27 PM
We do twist and turn in our conversations.
The original purpose of the thread started by JOhnGW was to communicate and discuss tips, tricks and techniques when FRN-ing.  I didn't read the whole darn thing to see how we drifted about but I looked at the first page and noticed we had a contribution from dear, disappeared Larry Tanman in 2015.
I looked at his profile - interestingly he was on the site in August this year.  Why he never commented anything in all this time  defeats me, if he is visiting the site from time to time.
I always used to enjoy his company on the forum(s) and interesting naked lifestyle that he shared so generously.  Now that he is 'emancipated' with a naturist partner (Kayaker) he seems to have no need for chatting about it.  Hey ho.  I wonder of they're still together and enjoying lots of nudity in nature?
John
Title: Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
Post by: jbeegoode on December 05, 2020, 01:44:00 AM
Miss 'em both.
Jbee