Free Range Naturism

Naturism => General Naturism Discussion => Topic started by: jbeegoode on October 14, 2015, 12:40:34 AM

Title: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on October 14, 2015, 12:40:34 AM
I couldn't find a thread on barefeet, barefoot all over. I'm surprised that the topic hasn't popped up, kicked out, stepped forward.

Soon, I've got a seven part series about it to publish on TheFreeRangeNaturist.org, but as I was setting it up, I stumbled onto a problem with free range barefooting.

I've been laid up for a couple of weeks with extreme pain in a localized section of my left foot. I stepped on a cholla cactus needle, mainlining into the nerve, precisely where Morten;s Nueroma had been messing with me. All the barefooting that I have done in recent years, no probs and I get three of these needles within an hour. Were the Cholla plants angry? Was it some weird karma, what are the odds?

Anyway, there I sat at the doctor's offices confronted by antibiotics, pain pills, tetanus shots and steroids. Perhaps this talk of ours as natural and healthy barefooting needs to be tempered with practical natural history. Infection and tetanus has been a part of and often deadly part of life for the duration.

I'm suggesting a tetanus booster. Just in case. I haven't gotten one since 1968, but maybe, if I'm going to be out there naked, it might be a good precaution.

Jbee
Barefoot all over all over
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on October 14, 2015, 03:23:05 PM
OUCH!   

Sorry about the cactus.  We have pine needles which often penetrate feet, but no cactus around here.  On another forum someone complained about blackberries and bare feet.  Some plants are just a hazard for every king of other animal, and maybe that's why some have hoofs.

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nudewalker on October 14, 2015, 08:35:31 PM
I remember the warnings as a child to be careful and not step on a rusty nail. The cactus needle was much the same and my father's voice ringing in my ear "See' I told you" as the nurse administered the tetanus shot. Later my years as a medic necessitated updated doses of tetanus vaccine so as a routine I get updated.

Sorry to hear of your plight. I was really looking forward to another adventure story from you and DF. Heal quickly my friend!
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Davie on October 15, 2015, 10:13:52 AM
We were warned to be careful whilst staying at a naturist gite in France. The danger to bare feet was walking on a bee. There were quite a few about pollinating the clover. I did bare walk bare foot but watched were I walked with more care than usual

Davie  8)
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: balead on October 15, 2015, 11:46:56 AM
I've stepped on bees at least twice, once this year. It made me really regret it for a few days!
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on October 15, 2015, 10:00:16 PM
I used to play golf barefoot as a teen. One day, I was playing the best game of my life. There was a patch of clover in the middle of the fairway where my ball lay.

I got nailed by a bee, the score ran into double digits per hole.

Some clubs don't allow bare feet. My game improves remarkably when barefoot, even better nude.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Davie on October 16, 2015, 01:19:23 AM
I've never really been one for dancing but I love it when naked. We had a cèilidh at one event and I noticed that nearly every one, as well as being naked had removed their footwear. Footwear just seemed so unnecessary and heavy. Doesn't hurt so much if someone treads on your foot either!

Davie  8)
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: kzoobob on October 16, 2015, 01:29:40 AM
A few years ago I was splitting wood for the wood burning stove in shoes and a sweat shirt. I managed to stir up a nest of yellow jackets and get bitten several times. I told my wife, "Emergency Room". While on the way the headlights of oncoming cars started to get fuzzy. At the ER they treated me to raise my BP (my usual problem is high BP). Since one of the bites was high on my thigh they were kidding me about going commando. They were surprised when I told them what I had actually been wearing.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on October 16, 2015, 05:19:54 PM
When I was a kid I was always climbing trees, exploring and poking my nose in where probably it shouldn't have been. I had my fair share of run-ins with yellow jackets to the point that I was probably on their "favorite places to visit" list.

When I was still in grade school we were visiting with some friends at their lake house. We were playing out on the shore and I was running on the pier and stirred up a nest underneath. I was stung 7-8 times. One of the little buggers got me right below my left eye. I looked like I had been in a fight and got tagged with a respectable right hook.

The man who we were visiting was a painter, of the house variety. This was in the mid sixties so not many painters used spray equipment. He climbed up ladders and painted the trim and such with brushes. He also was aquainted with bees and wasps and had his special treatments.

Apparently the standard response by painters to a sting was to dab a bit of paint thinner on the site. I guess it has the effect of drawing out the venom. It worked. All the stings did not swell up with the exception of the sting on my face. He was hesitant to put paint thinner that close to my eye.

There are many natural substances that will do the same thing but you use what you have available.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on October 16, 2015, 06:58:03 PM
I published the first in that barefoot series. It is just an experiential mindfulness thing, that I thought may have been placed here first, but maybe TSNS, not too long ago. There are probably 10 installments that will be placed in between the trip reports, weekly. They are things that I accumulated through the years and cobbled together.
http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/10/15/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-one/
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on October 18, 2015, 01:14:48 AM
Quote from: jbee
I used to play golf barefoot as a teen

In the last couple of years I have had the opportunity to walk barefoot on a few golf courses and have been amazed by the velvet soft, carpet-like, consistency that the groundsmen seem to be able to achieve. The two nicest were at Pebble Beach CA which was perplexing how they got it so fine and soft and the Weston-Kirtin Hotel at Phoenix AZ where I walked at night in jbee and DF's footsteps on the cool, soft sward of the fairway and lay naked with them under the stars on the baize-like fineness of one of the greens. The most challenging was last December, on the frosty and altogether less even fairway and greens of a golf course in the north east of England.

I was at the chiropodists yesterday getting my callouses reduced and the chiropodist was generally very complementary about my propensity for going barefoot, eschewing the wearing of male hosiery. 

Jbee, I'm so sorry to hear about your cactus thorn injury and how long it's taking to heal.  Must have been very bad puncture. I can sympathise because I stepped on a cut branch of hawthorn in my garden last week and whilst the injury was more minor, I was unaware that a part of a thorn had broken off in my heel, until it became a little inflamed and painful.  I was able to cut back the skin and extract the offending pricker and the pain and swelling receded, apparently healed, in about 3 days.  However, a week later, having had the hard skin removed from my heel, the cavity was still there and healing under the scab that had quickly regrown over the top. I think I ought to go for a tetanus booster from that and the fact that I was helping some people remove a load of rotten wood a few weeks ago and a rusty old nail poked me in the chest just slightly breaking the skin and drawing blood.  What's the incubation period for tetanus?

I have to work hard to keep my heels and big toes from getting too calloused.  Whilst a small amount of harder dry skin does provide a measure of protection whilst barefooting, if left, it gets thicker until it cracks.  My feet have been much more well kept in recent years (well probably decades!) since I realised I should maintain them more actively and so I go to the chiropodist 3 or 4 times a year and in the interim, thanks to some ancient advice from our much-missed, now non-combatant correspondent Graham, who was a podiatrist, I sandpaper my feet regularly which keeps them smooth, cosmetically maintained and not cracked. 

What do others do about foot condition maintenance?  Is it a problem for others?

John

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: milfmog on October 18, 2015, 11:35:44 AM
What do others do about foot condition maintenance?
I don't generally suffer from hard skin build up or cracked heels. However, having once had a heel crack I realised how painful and inconvenient it could be and so developed a continuing preventative maintenance programme.

I use a "Ped egg" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/JML-Ped-Egg-Foot-File/dp/B004TA21XG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1445160629&sr=8-1&keywords=ped+egg) (best described as a surform or grater for the feet) to remove hard skin. Once a month a quick going over the heels is plenty and leaves the skin with a slightly leathery texture. I then use Body Shop "hemp foot balm" to soften the skin slightly. I may sometimes apply a second treatment of the balm part way through the month. For the last eight or nine years, that is all I have required.

Have fun,


Ian.

PS I recently had a hawthorn spine go right through the sole of a shoe and a good quarter of an inch into the ball of my foot. That made my eyes water! Carefully pulling and twisting with a pair of fine nosed pliers before I removed the shoe was sufficient to get it out of my foot in one piece (one of the things the generally lives in my car is a cheap multi-tool; this was not what I expected to use it for but...). All that was required afterwards was a dab with TCP soaked cotton wool and a sticky plaster to keep it clean for a day or so while it healed.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on October 18, 2015, 04:18:49 PM
What do others do about foot condition maintenance?  Is it a problem for others?
John


I sometimes get cracked calluses around the back of my heels.   My remedy has been to use a commercial foot cream after my shower.  I use "Gold Bond" foot cream or other similar products.  It lets the callus be soft enough not to crack clear through. 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on October 18, 2015, 09:00:53 PM
I'm probably down to a couple of hours a week deep massaging my feet. I use Bag Balm to keep the cracks away.

Three to 30 days for tetanus, generally much closer to the former. Tetanus wasn't completely ruled out, by the nurse practitioner, but likely would have appeared by the time that she saw me, ten day later. She said that it can stay local, as well as the more classic malady.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on October 19, 2015, 01:01:28 AM
I noticed, Ian, at AHG in August that you had very svelte soles for someone that does as much walking as you.  Now I know the secret!  My wife uses a ped egg.  Maybe I should get one too - the sandpaper might not be enough.

I hope your foot continues steady recovery Jbee.

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: milfmog on October 20, 2015, 10:20:01 AM
I noticed, Ian, at AHG in August that you had very svelte soles for someone that does as much walking as you.  Now I know the secret!  My wife uses a ped egg.  Maybe I should get one too - the sandpaper might not be enough.
It's no secret, John, I have shared my regimen previously (on the old TSNS forum - that feels a long time ago now). I recall a few others saying they had used the ped eggs with good results too. Sandpaper will probably work, but I suspect it takes far longer to get all the built up hard skin off with paper than it does with the ped egg (compare removing wood from a block using sand paper with using a surform).

The Body Shop balm works well and absorbs fairly well into the skin. I have previously used other products such as the Scholl Cracked Heel Repair Cream, but it leaves the skin very greasy and does not seem to be half as effective.

Have fun,


Ian.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: balead on October 20, 2015, 03:42:44 PM
This year I've used nothing to treat my feet. In the past the only thing I've used is moisturising cream if my feet felt particularly sore or if I noticed cracks.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on October 20, 2015, 08:43:42 PM
Yea, I've never sanded my feet. It seems that with good oils, that they should take care of themselves, naturally. What would the ancients do? They would brush and scrape to clean pores and make a better avenue to cleanse, clearing the dead skin cells. Does this make for more callous, scar tissue and does that make for less cleanse, making a cycle? What is your thinking?

I'm wondering what toxins are used to make sandpaper, to treat it, get the sand to stick, etc. One would need to cleanse pretty deep after getting it into pores. Ever soaked them afterwards and looked at the residue? Jus' thinkin'.

Also, like using lipbalm, overuse may cause dependence and diet may be a factor. I only use bag balm occasionally as massage, or when I see drying. I wipe most of it off after massage. It gets all over the floor, anyway, an oily trail of foot prints. ;D

I notice that heat and heat from exercise will make my feet sweat more. This brings out oils. They get slippery on rocks. It gets more difficult when climbing, similar to why climbers use chalk on their hands. The weekly sweat helps the natural expiration of the skins pores and toxins. This, I think, applies to the bottoms of feet, too.

Well, off to soak this wound in sea salt and lay the feet out in the sunshine to dry and get light naturally. 

I heard of a study last night with explanation from a doctor. Cells have a piece for processing light for communication, just like plant chlorophyll process, just one different molecular component away. UV therapy is good. UV blockers are bad and cancer causing. Sunscreen causes cancer! Sun light heals.
Jbee 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: milfmog on October 21, 2015, 10:27:45 AM
I am sure that I would not require the use of the ped egg if I spent more time barefoot outside. My problem is that I do not have enough opportunity to walk barefoot on rough textured ground, which would naturally abrade the hard skin.

Have fun,


Ian.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on October 27, 2015, 11:16:36 AM
Barefoot all over, all over: Part THREE is up with a trip report:
http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/10/27/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-three/
I republished "Alf’s Rules for Hiking Barefoot" from a ways back. It is a wonderful guideline. It made me miss Alf's camaraderie.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on November 01, 2015, 02:48:26 PM
I don't really like using moisturisers because a) their effect is very temporary and b) if you walk off barefoot, no matter how effectively you have rubbed in the unguent used, it comes off on the floor and/or makes stuff stick to your feet.  Not everything for the sole is good for the soul.

My trip to a new chiropodist mentioned below was interesting in that I broached all the footcare topics to get a 'second opinion' having got used to my previous chiropodist's opinions.

She seemed supportive of sandpaper used carefully as they themselves use a little craft drill sized sanding disc to smooth off their decallousing work. She had a robust view of moisturisation which was similar to mine with the additional opinion that moisture was good for cosmetic appeal and helped avoid cracking (which I don't let happen!).  I asked if there was any way to prevent growth of hard dry skin and she was of the opinion that it varies widely across individuals- I was middle to low in propensity to callousing.  I asked her to check for any signs of athlete's foot which I have had a bit of in the past but have ensured I haven't had again for many years.  She inspected and pronounced my pedal dermatological health was good.  However after she'd carved my flaky bits off (and done my feet!), she remarked that the edges of my sole were a bit pink which may possibly indicate subcutaneous fungal activity. Whilst this was asymptomatic, it might be causing more rapid callousing.  Oh dear.  So she suggested a month applying an antifungal cream twice daily.  So I complied. 2 weeks in I report that the moisturising effect prevents the cosmetic dry appearance.  I can't really see any reduction in pinkness and I won't be able to judge the rate of callous formation for 3 months minimum because it's not that noticeable until 3-4 months have gone by.  The deeply irritating thing is that there seems no way to prevent the inconvenience of walking around with feet damp with cream other than spending 20' in the bathroom waiting for it to absorb or hopping about on the minimum of foot area which is ludicrous or, as I am doing, using the same pair of old flipflops when 'creamed up' on the assumption that the soles of the footwear will get saturated in the goofus and so I'll not lose on the floor all the benefit that I've just spent ages massaging into me old plates.

One situation that always moisturises the feet is the wearing of socks & shoes.  After a reluctant day shod, the natural reabsorption of sweat into the skin moisturises it.  And in case you are crying 'too much information' at this point, note that I don't have sweaty or smelly feet!  I look after their hygiene and welfare better!

From the heart of my sole and the soul in my heart,

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 04, 2015, 04:26:13 AM
I put Barefoot all over, all over: Part FOUR a simple quick mention of conditioning feet over at:

http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/11/04/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-five/

I got an email from our peddler of barefoot sandals in Colorado. He has produced a series of videos as follows. I can't disagree with him in these. He also has some new shoe designs available. I kind of like the way that the heel is made snug without the endless tying of the huaraches. Here are the links:
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-1-toughen-your-feet/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-2-your-calves-will-get-sore/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-3-prepare-to-run-barefoot/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-4-walk-before-you-run/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-5-its-frustrating-to-learn/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-6-lengthen-your-achilles-tendon/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-7-use-transition-shoes/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-8-be-barefoot-everywhere/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-9-barefoot-and-minimalist-shoes/
http://xeroshoes.com/barefoot-running-tips/barefoot-running-myths-lies-and-truth-10-you-cant-do-it/

Jbee

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on November 04, 2015, 09:04:15 PM
I republished "Alf’s Rules for Hiking Barefoot" from a ways back. It is a wonderful guideline. It made me miss Alf's camaraderie.

I miss his posts too. His reports of camping in the north woods always made me want to go camping too.

His reports on enforced nudity were responsible for my 1st attempt at that throat parching activity.
I'm glad you saved that post of his.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on November 05, 2015, 01:33:34 AM
I also miss Alf. He was a great contributor and as I recall our one Canadian.
I do hope his disappearance was of his own volition rather than that the great crash of '09 severed his connection and that he is well, happy, prosperous and naked a lot!  Wasn't it Alf that went barefoot at work?

Re xero shoes: My huaraches are 2 x self made pair and 1 x Xero shoes.  The xeros are the comfortablest footwear I possess!

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 05, 2015, 05:35:30 PM

Re xero shoes: My huaraches are 2 x self made pair and 1 x Xero shoes.  The xeros are the comfortablest footwear I possess!

John

I prefer my leather homemade. They conform, the sole near the toes doesn't fold under when I hit a carpet, or slide my feet and my feet don't sweat next to the rubber. They are a time consuming pain to lace up, however. I'm considering those new ones that he is making. They just slide on and might hold my heal like my five toes shoes or huaraches. I still have these duck feet 4x'z size E to contend with when buying shoes. I might buy the available hardware for those shoes and put them on leather. This new thing may be the compromise that I need for hot flat surfaces in everyday use.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on November 06, 2015, 08:20:57 PM
I also miss Alf. He was a great contributor and as I recall our one Canadian.
I do hope his disappearance was of his own volition rather than that the great crash of '09 severed his connection and that he is well, happy, prosperous and naked a lot!  Wasn't it Alf that went barefoot at work?

I seem to remember seeing a post lamenting his absence back then. He apparently was monitoring the site at the time and replied that that was indeed the cause of his falling away. He had become frustrated with the intermittent site problems, blue screens, no service et.al.

I didn't get the impression he was annoyed with anyone.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Footing
Post by: Kayaker on November 07, 2015, 11:13:43 PM
I am a tenderfoot.  Can't walk barefoot on anything unless soft.  That's a dilemma because I can't stand shoes.  Ugh.

However, since I spend a lot of time in water i have come to really enjoy a pair of kayaking footies that's almost like bare feet.  I wear them year round shuffling in the sand or gravel in lakes and beach.  They're like those five toe shoes.  I love them. They are warm in winter and neutral in summer.

I recently got a similar pair for minimalist footwear on rocks and getting to/from water that can take the heat off concrete but are webbed on top so airy.  Nice compromise.

Otherwise I'm in crocs flips or keens if I have to wear something, like protection from the bramble raspberries that claw at you mercilessly. 
Title: Re: Bare Footing
Post by: Bob Knows on November 08, 2015, 05:59:40 PM
I am a tenderfoot.  Can't walk barefoot on anything unless soft.  That's a dilemma because I can't stand shoes.  Ugh.



I understand Kayaker.  My feet used to be like that.  I wanted to go barefoot but I would get 100 feet off my lawn and my feet hurt so much I had to go back.  Shoes make our feet too tender to walk on mother earth, our feet end up crippled and dependent.  It took me 3 full years of training to restore my natural foot strength and ability, and even the 4th year they got better. 

I started by getting a pair of this sole "huaraches" from Xero Shoes.  They still protect feet from sharp rocks but don't confine your toes, etc.  After a year of wearing those I was hiking on a mountain one day and the strap broke so I walked back barefoot, and still haven't fixed them.  That was 3 years ago now.  Even the dry pine needles seldom penetrate my leather like but flexible natural soles. 

My suggestion is to get some thin sole sandals that offer minimal but real protection for tender feet, and let your feet begin with a half way to bare experience for a year or so.  Then deliberately push their strength and tenderness sometimes each day.  Like any kind of physical conditioning feet take regular exercise to become strong.   You don't need shoes, none of us do. 

Bob


Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 08, 2015, 07:54:41 PM
Kayaker, what are the footies? Can you give us links? I looked around and found Darkfin split toe booties. Are these them?
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on November 10, 2015, 02:19:11 AM
Lisa, I would deffo recommend huaraches as they let you be nearly barefoot without having to worry too much about the ground conditions.  It seems they helped Bob rehabilitate his tolerance of barefooting on natural ground.
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nudewalker on November 10, 2015, 03:51:47 PM
Kayaker, what are the footies? Can you give us links? I looked around and found Darkfin split toe booties. Are these them?
Jbee

Yes please! As much as I have conditioned myself to be barefoot there are those places (the old railroad bed comes to mind) where it is too hot, rough or uncomfortable to be barefoot. And since I've been using my kayak to find more out of the way places a foot covering that is non slip would be a plus!
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on November 10, 2015, 05:51:31 PM

Yes please! As much as I have conditioned myself to be barefoot there are those places (the old railroad bed comes to mind) where it is too hot, rough or uncomfortable to be barefoot. And since I've been using my kayak to find more out of the way places a foot covering that is non slip would be a plus!


Yep.  Bare human feet are 100% natural, but the crushed rock of a railroad bed is not natural at all.  There are very few natural places that human feet are not better than shoes.

The dirt on my driveway sometimes gets pretty hot on a June (high sun angle) afternoon, but again that's an unnatural construct for vehicle traffic.  The surrounding wild area is easier on feet. I still have my huaraches if needed for crushed rock gravel but I hate wearing them. 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 10, 2015, 11:54:54 PM
I published a rap about Bare feet at the website: It is part number FIVE:
http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/11/10/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-six/

I titled it, "Personal Anecdotal Observations." It covers blind barefooting, manmade surfaces like Bob is getting at in the last post (Those Wonderful Smooth Hard Concrete Walkways), and a warning about the time I shredded  my feet and how one might avoid that.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 15, 2015, 09:36:25 PM
I posted part six of the series. It's a short history of shoes with practical applications. It is titled "All of This Thing about Shoes is Relatively Recent History" with evidence toward that argument about shoes being an improvement.
It is meant to be encouragement to a novice, or anti-bare.

I think the next will go over making barefoot shoes suggestions. The next week, a list of resources and links should wrap up the series.

This injured bare foot is clearing up slowly. This week I got a flu, so I was distracted from it and just laid about, tapping keyboards and exploring with a mouse. I hadn't been sick in years, probably the imbalance that I physically feel since the regime of antibiotics I was given. When it rains it pours and I figure that this should all pass. All of this is directly related to the beginning, the cholla needle in the nerve of my barefoot. I'm the best argument for not going barefoot...and a good embarrassment to AMA/FDA medical science.

The best archaeological evidence available, shows us that for 10,000 plus years, people around here wore nothing but grass, reed (I suspect corn) weave sandals and jewelry. That's all that has been found. They had fires at the entrances of their dome huts and the sun to keep warm. Nothing else was discovered. They did trade and interact with others in the vast region, clear to the gulf of California. There were those there who used huaraches. Locally they developed a network of unity and warning system clear across the valley like a wagon wheel and hub. They had irrigated farming networks, ball courts and had intimate knowledge of the lands and uses. Excavation has been done, but no clothing, or none survived. They probably wasted little. Perhaps they burned the last remnants of bags,blankets, or coverings in cold? There is nearly always a warm sunny part of the day to be naked. All that is needed is shelter with fire during the night. Blankets of what, I don't know?  Leather of course, there was plenty of deer in the forests along the rivers.

If you are living in the village, you don't need shoes. In the forest, you don't need shoes. Running across the desert, shoes make sense. Now, I doubt that they allowed cholla in their villages and habitations, like I do.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 24, 2015, 08:34:11 PM
I just posted Barefoot all over, all over: Part EIGHT at TheFreeRangeNaturist.org (TFRN ?).
It is a list of resources recommended. There should be a wealth of conversation stimulation there.

http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/12/24/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-eight/

The videos are hilarious in the least.
Jbee 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: reubenT on December 28, 2015, 08:25:15 PM
I have thought how easy it seemed to go barefoot all the time as a kid,  in the 70's,  and wondered why it seems so much harder now.   For one thing I wear shoes/boots for work protection,  spend very little time walking barefoot because most of my time is spent working.  So I never really get conditioned to it anymore.     And I just realized that I do weigh quite a bit more now than then.  Probably putting a lot more psi ground pressure on my feet than I used to.    Just grew up, went to work and gained a lot of weight in muscle mass. 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on December 28, 2015, 11:25:17 PM
Yes its hard for feet to be in shape when they are forced to be abused all day at work. 

Today I took my snow boots off at the grocery store and put them on my cart while shopping.  Its about 20F outside (-6C) so I wore the snow boots outside.   I go barefoot to drive and outside for short distances even in cold.



Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on February 17, 2016, 08:51:09 AM
I wear boots when I go ski-ing locally, but I only put them on these days when I put my skis on.  If there is a bit of a walk until there is sufficient snow, then I do it barefoot, and I almost always take them off on the way back at the same time as my skis so my feet can enjoy the experience of walking free in the last of the snow. There is an additonal safety reason. I am so unused to walking in boots that I feel very clumsy in them, in addition to the jarring of my joints. I can walk more lightly barefoot, even though I have to carry the heavy load of skis and boots on my rucksack.

Otherwise, I barely wear shoes at all....., especially when bare!
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on February 19, 2016, 11:13:07 PM
Wow MartinM!

How long can you walk in snow barefoot.  Longest I've achieved is about 3-5 minutes!  Isn't there a high risk of damage e.g. frostbite, severe pain.
Where do you do the skiing?

John
Title: Re: Footies for tenderfoot
Post by: Kayaker on February 21, 2016, 06:40:29 PM
I was trying to find links to the water shoes For winter beach walking and winter kayaking.  This winter I went in deeper water nice and toasty with all the winter gear and could tolerate chilly conditions quite nicely because I was protected from the water for longer periods. 

I couldn't find picture links but there are three versions I like.  Mostly I like NRS's gear for shoes and gloves and pants, Body glove for rash guards and they have some good board shoes, and Keens and Cudas for shoes.  My favorite though is NRS, but you have to have narrow feet.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: John P on February 23, 2016, 01:05:10 AM
My friend Dan favors Vibram "Five Fingers" shoes. I call them his froggy feet. Here we are in Florida before we got far enough down the trail to undress (he likes kilts too):
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/Naturism/DSCN1709.jpg)
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on February 23, 2016, 08:25:12 AM
Wow MartinM!

How long can you walk in snow barefoot.  Longest I've achieved is about 3-5 minutes!  Isn't there a high risk of damage e.g. frostbite, severe pain.
Where do you do the skiing?

John
Depends very much on conditions. I have certainly gone half to one hour walking in snow and in good conditions would probably be ok for rather longer. Firm snow is easier than soft, powdery snow which gets all over the foot, as the top of foot has little insulation while the bottom has a thick sole from going barefoot 24/7.

My feet still have to condition to the cold each autumn and I never walk far if I start to feel significant numbness, although this is rare so long as I keep moving, even walking on the spot, if I can't find something insulating to stand on. It is however important to keep the body warm, as otherwise heat is withdrawn from extremities. My hands suffer the cold rather more than my feet, as they are not working, and we are only talking one or two degrees of frost.

I have Vibram 5 fingers which were great initially, but now prefer Sockwas as my standby footwear.  They are thinner, lighter and more flexible, so can be rolled up and put in pockets ans slipped on quickly if required. Generally kept for sharp, manmade tracks or in my local case, sharp, eroded limestone.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on February 26, 2016, 04:34:51 PM
Ah, I see, Martin,
like so many achievements it's down to practice and conditioning.
My feet aren't too horny as, whilst I go barefoot a lot it's in domestic and 'light duty' circumstances.  In the UK if you walk on snow at all it is usually fresh/soft and near melting thus I suspect it has high heat conductivity, taking the heat from your foot quickly.  It is unusual in the UK to find snow lasting long enough or there being enough places to walk that reproduces the more compacted snow you describe.  My walks on snow have almost exclusively been naked.  In fact I now wonder what my duration on snow would be if well and warmly clothed.

Thanks for the info - the differences really interesting .

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on February 27, 2016, 08:41:20 AM
Minus 4 C is rare here so I only have one experience ( other than brief early morning walks in the frost) of walking in these conditions and in the snow and. I believe I got a little frost nip after half to one hour, but it was the kind of partially melted and refrozen snow you fall through at each step.

However, I live in the Lake District where we freqently have snow on the hills and I go ski-ing to one place where we have a tow. I would go today, but think I have too much work to do. Anyway, I usually walk barefoot until there is sufficient snow to ski and on the return. My most difficult snow experience is deep (about 18 inches) powder snow where it covers the whole lower leg at each step, because only the sole of foot is well insulated from being regularly barefoot.

I remember years ago the pain in my feet of walking into a cold sea, probably above 10 degrees C, which I would now consider quite warm. However, there is definitely a significant degree of annual conditioning to the cold.

Not sure how I would get on in minus 10. If we ever get that here I will let you know.....
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on March 08, 2016, 12:29:22 PM
Martin,
Lake District!  What made me think you were in the US!
How nice to live there.  I was there holidaying for a few days, with some US friends, last July. 
At one point I had a sad disappointment at a missed opportunity which oddly has returned, haunting me quietly over the last few days.
Standing on the shore of Lake Ullswater on a sunny weekday late afternoon after the crowds had dispersed, around 6-6.30pm I recall, I found myself alone, away from the others and staring into clear, clear water with a shallow slope down to dark, greenish depths.  How I wanted to throw my clothes off and swim.  One of my friends then strolled up (of the female persuasion) and I shared my desire with her and invited her to join me or at least look after my wallet and mobile.  Whilst she is generally the sort of person that 'goes for it', I was surprised that she calmly but firmly talked me out of it.  On what grounds, you may ask?  The 'public' nudity (Although there were very few people around, it was actually rather close to the boat tours dock albeit closed for the day), and not having a towel therefore wasting time waiting for me to dry off...and you don't need to exercise much grey matter to deduce which was the more firmly argued!  I should have just bunged her my trousers and dived in.  By the time we'd finished argy bargying that one, my wife and my friend's husband had appeared and the moment had passed.  After a bit more walking about we went to a nearby restaurant and had a pleasant dinner.

I mention the latter point as after this year's floods I saw a national TV news article video'd from the same locale and there was not a lot left of the lake trips jetty and the restaurant was a wreck!

Later, researching wild swimming, I read about the surprisingly high number of people who acquire a range from minor hospitalisation to death from spontaneously jumping in to Lake District Lakes in just the manner I described.  They seize up or faint or get swept by currents and get hypothermia or otherwise due to wind, currents, the cold water and/or the gasping that generates.  Whilst I suspected the water might be dangerously cold, the shallow walk into swimming depth looked pretty safe.

Any experience of Lake District Skinny dipping, Martin?

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on March 08, 2016, 05:54:23 PM
Missed opportunity? If the frigid waters had not produced fatal heart attack, your soon arriving wife would have killed ya!

So, what happened to the restaurant and jetty?
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on March 13, 2016, 11:51:28 PM
There were terrible floods in Cumbria this winter.  Huge damage and displacement of people.  The location I was at was badly affected.

Coincidentally; In the news today is word of an 'emergency' airlift of some of uk's most popular biscuits due to a well known biscuit factory in Cumbria having been flooded on 5th December and still under repair & recovery work.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/emergency-biscuits-flown-into-uk-due-to-national-shortage-a6927561.html

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on April 01, 2016, 09:22:58 AM
Rediscovering skinny dipping in the Lakes, which we used to do with family on holiday walks here and Wales, was the beginning of my path into naturism. I used to spend the summer mostly encased in wetsuits sailing and so would winter walk, so didn't get much chance, but I remember a couple of times on walks with my brother going in mountain pools, the second time introducing his children to it, but he wouldn't join in that time. As I sailed less in summer I started walking more, and so naturally more opportunity.

3 or 4 years ago I started doing a lot more 'wild swimming' and on a few occasions joined some of the many groups now doing it, but they mostly swim in wetsuits and I prefer a peaceful meditative swim au naturel. I did join one small group for a weekend camp in Eskdale and, although we swam mostly in wet suits in one of the more public pools on the first afternnoon, later on after setting up camp I introduced them to traditional skinny dipping.

These days, my walking in the fells is almost entirely barefoot and I always look for somewhere to skinny dip. If I can walk 'skyclad' as well, so much the better, although there are fewer chances to combine that with swimming as the quieter spots have fewer tarns and suitable mountain becks. Of course, just wearing a pair of shorts and maybe a t-shirt, it only takes a moment to be in the water and usually I can dry off in the air.

I have also been spending increasing time in the local woods, which are great fror walking in barefoot although I go off path a lot and have rediscovered tree climbing, barefoot and skyclad, of course. See tree hugging thread. The problem going off path is that sometimed I come across patches of brambles etc which are difficult to get around barefoot!

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: John P on April 03, 2016, 08:11:43 PM
If people will tolerate my use of this thread, I'll describe my last week in Martin's neighborhood, the English Lake District. We did talk about getting together, but when I arrived it seemed more difficult than I'd expected, and I bailed out on it. The issue there was that we were staying at a guest house run by an organization (not a cult, I assure you!) called HF Holidays, where they take you out on guided walks and when you're back at the house, they feed and entertain you. Evenings are especially difficult: dinner isn't over until 8:30 and then it would take a lot of will power to decide to leave the premises. I should have realized this ahead of time, and I apologize to Martin for being unrealistic about it.

So, we had a program of walks. The Lake District is rather infamous for frequent rain, and we had our share:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/Naturism/UK/DSCF3584.JPG

However, conditions improved as the week went on (village of Troutbeck seen across the  valley):
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/Naturism/UK/DSCF3882.jpg

A view over Windermere, and I forget which mountains with snow on them:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/Naturism/UK/DSCF3883.jpg

Blea Tarn, where our leader said "They take all the pictures for calendars and chocolate boxes":
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/Naturism/UK/DSCF3914.jpg

Clouds over Tilberthwaite:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/Naturism/UK/DSCF3935.jpg

There weren't any naturist interludes, and mostly, the weather would have discouraged it. But I did ask the leader if people swim in the lakes and streams in summer, and he said they most definitely do. We then speculated on the possibility of HF offering a theme trip along the lines of "Walking and Wild Swimming" with swim stops at various places. I said if that ever happened, I hoped that it would be set up so that anyone who wanted to swim nude would have the chance to do it. He didn't make much response to that.

"Wild swimming" has become a recognized activity in Britain recently, meaning swimming in places that aren't pools or beaches. It doesn't necessarily mean swimming nude, but of course it's what some people want!

Here's HF's web page:
https://www.hfholidays.co.uk/
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nudewalker on April 04, 2016, 04:20:29 AM
That was a disappointing answer concerning wild swimming but what about in Spain,France or Croatia for example. I looked at the HFHOlidays website with great interest as it would be nice to have meals and lodging planned in advance. Just curious, not that anything like that would be in the near future for me, but much like the NEWT tours.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on April 05, 2016, 09:49:02 PM
Quote from: John P
If people will tolerate my use of this thread, I'll describe my last week in Martin's neighborhood, the English Lake District
Well, I'm entirely happy to tolerate the posting of such splendid pictures albeit that they explain why nudity was tricky to attain and have nasty clothing clearly shown on some :D
Blea Tarn, Wow!  Never been there - must go one day.
Shame that you were unable to get naked but hey, that sounds like my experience of such events/holidays/opportunities.  Hopes spring eternal but cruel reality mows them down!
I'm about to go on holiday m'self to Florida (Keys).  Bust resort is our destination but you never know... opportunity may arise and chance favours the prepared backpack! :)
John

PS, John P can you explain what BBcode or whatever you used to post the pictures?  I note the URLs are dropbox...haven't tried that for pic posting.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: milfmog on April 07, 2016, 05:04:38 PM
I'm about to go on holiday m'self to Florida (Keys).  Bust resort is our destination but you never know... opportunity may arise and chance favours the prepared backpack! :)
John

PS, John P can you explain what BBcode or whatever you used to post the pictures?  I note the URLs are dropbox...haven't tried that for pic posting.
Enjoy your holiday John.

The dropbox links are simply the ones provided by dropbox. Simply upload your pics and in the dropbox folder right click on the file you want to share and select "copy Dropbox link" then paste that into your post.

Have fun,


Ian.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on April 13, 2016, 10:41:20 PM
Thanks, Ian
Thought as much.  V familiar with dropbox - used to use a lot for business.
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: John P on April 13, 2016, 11:49:35 PM
Sorry, I only just noticed John Nuduke's question from a week ago, but Ian has answered it as well as I could. However, I think Dropbox has reduced the services they offer to free accounts opened after October 2012, so those can't have a "Public" folder. I use the Public folder a lot for photos I want to share: what I do is just right-click on the item, it pops up a menu that includes "Copy public link", I select that and then I can paste it into a forum posting. I'm not sure that it's so easy for accounts opened since 2012. But if you have somewhere to put your images and you're asking how the BBcode works to show it here, then showing an image from a web URL would be like this (except that I've added a space after the initial square bracket so this won't actually show a picture):
[ img]https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28291527/IMG_2646.jpg[/img]

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on May 01, 2016, 05:21:46 AM
Tis the season of the bare foot!

I tracked back to this from a visitor to my website. It is enjoyable, not much that we haven't covered, but she wraps it up and breathes inspiration into the practice of barefoot hiking.

http://appalachiantrials.com/5-questions-i-get-asked-about-barefoot-hiking/

I went to her website. It is mostly trekking the Hudson Valley barefoot. She is barefoot, but pictures suggest, tights and tight T are her summer cruising attire.
TheBarefootHiker.com
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on May 02, 2016, 12:33:16 AM
I seldom hike barefoot, but am almost always barefoot at home. I got to thinking about hiking barefoot and the reason that I don't is because of the harsh environment I live in. So many sharp rocks and other pricklys that it is almost impossible.

Sitting here NIFOC I thought of a possibility. I will try it the next time out to see how long I can go before I have to put on footwear.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on May 02, 2016, 05:17:31 PM
It depends on the terrain as to how far I get. This desert is tough. I can get farther going granite rock to rock, if it is there, The extent of pricklys has great influence. For some reason this last year has brought lots of little thing through the air. My desert around my home keeps giving me all sorts of grief. It isn't if, but when. Previously, I could get around here easily, yet meticulously watching my step.

If I'm in a mountain forest the trail's erosion leaves a path of shrp granite rock shards.

Washes are sand, best is pristine after rain sand are a barefoot treat. Then there is Redington Pass, a mostly smooth varied surface of granite. When I hit the bottom, my shoes immediately disappear. I can spend hours delighted, wandering step by step barefoot all over.

The built up soil and silt of rich riparian areas is a safe  enjoyable barefoot terrain to stroll. The extra weight of a backpack has always strained my feet in creek waters, but this ultralight rigging is now a help.

Then the extreme desert heat can heat up rock to near frying pan caliber. The natural granite doesn't heat up as much as the unnatural concrete, unless it id dark blacker rock.
Some thoughts
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on May 02, 2016, 07:26:46 PM
Quote
I got to thinking about hiking barefoot and the reason that I don't is because of the harsh environment I live in. So many sharp rocks and other pricklys that it is almost impossible.

I said pretty much the same thing for years.  Our feet become crippled by years and years of shoes.  It takes years to regain natural foot strength and resilience.

Then one year I found a pair of those Huarache sandals that are so thin your foot has to accommodate rocks.  I used them for a year while my feet gained strength.  Then one day in the mountains a string on my sandal broke so I took them off.  It took me two more years of practice before my feet became less susceptible to pine needles and other sharp objects.  During those years I often had to pick the ends of pine needles out of my feet.  I also walked on my gravel driveway every day even though it was sometimes painful. 

Now I've been going barefoot full time for four years.  I no longer get pine needles stuck in my feet even walking through my dry pine forest.  The gravel on my driveway doesn't hurt though I still must be careful not to step on large rocks.  My biggest problem is the fashion police at stores and restaurants.  They sell shoes.  They hate people not having to buy.  WalMart doesn't care.

I have found that I am less likely to turn an ankle on lose gravel on my steep driveway and open hillsides than with shoes.  I no longer have to take daily pills for gout and my bunions have been reduced.  The "Earthing" benefits are enormous for overall health. 

It is "Impossible" at first to deal with the sharp rocks and prickleys.  I remember five years ago trying to walk my property barefoot, OUCH!  I got about 100 yards, and went back.  My property is all fractured (sharp) basalt, pine needles, sharp sticks, and crushed gravel driveway.  I encourage those who "can't" because of bad conditions to practice more and condition your feet.  It does take a while and you have to work at it.   If you give up and put your shoes back on your feet will never regain your natural ability.  Our ancestors walked barefoot on every kind of ground for millions of years.  Our feet can do it too if we give ourselves a chance to overcome the crippling effect of shoes.

Good luck to you. 

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on May 02, 2016, 08:36:57 PM
This is actually good advice, Bob.

I live in town so my choices are pretty much grass or pavement. Take your pick. Getting out to where there is natural landscape is a good excuse for going on a naked hike, if only to recondition my feet.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on May 03, 2016, 12:48:16 AM
When I worked every day for a living I had to wear shoes at work all week so the limited time I got to be barefoot on weekends never was enough for my feet to become natural feet.  i can understand how living in town makes it difficult.   Do what you can to be natural. 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on May 03, 2016, 06:43:42 AM
Quote
I got to thinking about hiking barefoot and the reason that I don't is because of the harsh environment I live in. So many sharp rocks and other pricklys that it is almost impossible.

....I have found that I am less likely to turn an ankle on lose gravel on my steep driveway and open hillsides than with shoes.  I no longer have to take daily pills for gout and my bunions have been reduced.  The "Earthing" benefits are enormous for overall health..... 

Good luck to you.
That's good encouragement for me. Glad to hear that.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on May 12, 2016, 11:20:39 PM
Quote from: Bob
During those years I often had to pick the ends of pine needles out of my feet.
We've had a spell of good weather and I've been barefoot a lot in last week or two (well, more than average as I doff the footwear and hosiery as much as poss these days!) which brings it's attendant splinters and thorns.  I have to say I really hate the business of getting small embedded splinters out of my sole.  So fiddly and often exhausting as one has to sit or lie with the foot in an accessible position which sometimes means advanced yoga contortions (as best I can at my age!).  We have a hawthorn hedge along part of the garden and those bastards have extremely painful, long, hard, brittle thorns.  If you get one of those, they can go deep and the end breaks off.  In that case one has to wait painfully sometimes for days for the tiny fragment to get near the surface so it can be extracted.  However, mercifully rare occurrence...so far!
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on May 21, 2016, 12:33:42 PM
It is one of the trials of the barefoot life that occasionally a thorn or other sharp, woody spine breaks off in your foot. Larger ones can usually be removed easily. The culprits are normally tiny. I am coming round to the the realisation that there is no point trying to dig these ones out, as it rarely works. Time, patience and nature run their course and they come out on their own. Meanwhile, one just has to learn to live with the discomfort.

Oh for the larger impaled thorn that is simply removed from the foot a moment later, and quickly forgotten.

Such issues are still fairly rare, and largely result from my proclivity for walking off path in woodlands.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on May 21, 2016, 04:10:40 PM
Quote from: MartinM
. . . there is no point trying to dig these ones out, as it rarely works. Time, patience and nature run their course and they come out on their own.

I've had the same experience, though not just on feet. If small enough they don't hurt enough to make me do anything about it. They can be irritating until I stop noticing them.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on May 21, 2016, 04:37:03 PM
When I get a thorn/splinter, it bothers me that I have a foreign body lodged "within" - risk of it going septic.  I prefer to extract them if I can although this sometimes needs the patience MartinM refers to whilst the little irritant rises close enough to the surface to get at with tweezers.  I have a particularly fine pair of surgical ones and a jeweller's eyeglass to get up close and personal with the splinter.  Depending on where in the sole the irritant is lodged, this can mean advanced level yoga contortions to see/reach it (and I don't do yoga!!)  :)

John

Afterthought:  remind me to tell you the story of my bit of embedded glass in the hand many years ago!  Not time to relate it at the moment.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on May 21, 2016, 04:49:35 PM
Speaking of glass, I have a cousin that was in an auto accident and had a tiny sliver of glass embedded in her hand. It was under the skin and the natural movement of muscles caused it to move. Essentially a miniature knife, it moved easily.

She had x-rays taken to try and locate it so it could be removed. They had a difficult time locating it because of it's size but they eventually got it removed.

I would say that if the object penetrates the epidermis absolutely get it out. There is more danger of infection and sepsis. If only in the dermis maybe not unless it's glass. The skin's purpose is to deal with this sort of problem. If you can't get at it let the skin do it's job.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on May 22, 2016, 06:31:11 PM
My glass story had some similarities, so here goes:  I was in a chemistry lab at university and broke some glass, a small portion of which lodged in a finger (I still have the scar).  At A&E (Emergency Room) the medic picked out the visible shards and looked at the cut and averred he couldn't see anything more.  I opined that since there was a lot of blood and messy tissue around the small cut (not serious only about 1/4"-1/2") and that the glass had gone in to my skin with some force, that it would be all too easy to miss a tiny bit deeper down.  Does glass show up under Xray? I asked.  This confounded the doc who turned to a colleague to see if they knew.  No dice. (What do we train them for 6 years for?).  Taking control of the situation I suggested he Xray anyway and if there were any more glass in and if glass did show up under Xray then he would have been as diligent as he could have been.  After a lot of waiting, we looked at the Xray together.  I spotted a tiny thin shadow which he firmly dismissed as indistinguishable from the grain of the Xray picture.  I had to admit is was not that dissimilar to other granularity on the film and allowed him to stitch me up and send me on my way. 

You will by now have guessed that I was right.  10 days later I had the stitches out and the cut was still uncomfortable.  I thought nothing of it but it remained tender and a bit swollen for days afterwards.  Then it formed a small fluid filled head under the skin.  I thought I better go to the doctors and see if it was an infection.  Needless to say again, in curiosity I squeezed the area and lo!  The tiny javelin shaped sliver of glass shot out with a little blood and fluid an settled politely on my finger for inspection.  Instant relief and healed up in another day or so.

That's why I don't like to leave bits in my skin unattended!  :)

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on May 23, 2016, 05:28:14 PM
Agreed. Infections are not to be ignored.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on May 30, 2016, 01:17:22 AM
What's the problem? It sorted itself out - you didn't need the doctor...  I have had several annoying small thorns in my foot, but I have learned better than to dig around in my foot to get them out, which might cause infection. Generally, after a few (irritating) weeks, the thorn will just pop out,in the same way as you describe your glass. This is clearly part of the body's mechanism for dealing with foreign objects.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on May 30, 2016, 06:26:45 PM
You are right of course, Martin.
The body will take care of its foreign invaders.  However, thorns are a rarity for me and I generally perform the 'minor operation' just to reduce the irritation of a little painful spot on the sole.

I nearly did myself an injury a few weeks ago when I trod on some hawthorn spikes and a couple went right through my shoe (cheap crocs ripoffs!) and left an ever so tiny spike end near the surface.  It was giving me merry hell not in terms of being very painful but just reminding me of its presence all the flipping time.  I had to get a jewellers loupe to see it.  Now, just imaging a tubby unfit 63 year old trying to look at the sole of his foot with a jeweller's loupe which requires getting the lens within a centimetre of the thorn plus needing to grab it with very fine tweezers.  It made advanced yoga look like a doddle!  My back and knee were stiff all the next day as a result of that little contortionist episode! :D

John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on May 30, 2016, 07:32:07 PM
Many of the  thorns around here have poisons in them. Many prickley pear have masses on tiny needles that sting for example. These get around, often on shoes. I tend to dig them out, even digging/carving holes in my body to be sure.

Last week, I had one between my toes. It was insignificant, but then in certain positions, it stopped me. I make a point to get anything I feel in my foot as soon as possible, before it breaks off and becomes too small for tweezers, or just rubbing off.

Yea, Nuduke. I add that it is much easier to bend and contort nude than with a waist belt or pants restricting movement. These days I see best when things are up very close to my eyes, which exaggerates my need to bend and contort. DF my best friend care giving helper, doesn't see well up close at all. She can't be of much help during such issues. I don't like the restriction of weight and tight body. I am working to increase my youthful elasticity. Warm temperatures, free movement of nudity and regular stretching like yoga, massage, etc. are required. Then the battle, over accepting the weight and fat that robs me of the flex and balance rages on. Back issues which lead to seemingly infinite other issues are a good stimulus to maintain my habits. I am finding that all of this is tied into my feet and their flex and natural movement in a bigg way.

Having been massaging and stretching and exercising my barefeet for years now, to compensate for decades of cowboy boots, I was surprised to learn yet another profound trick for the feet. It was presented as a yoga pose a couple of weeks ago. It is simply sitting my butt over/on top of my feet. It stretches them in the other direction, opening up a great deal of the intricate maze that they are. Incorporating a prana mudra, where Three fingers are out and the one closest to the thumb is pressed to the base of the thumb, as they simply rest on the legs, releases amazing stuff. We did that for 21 minutes that first time and...whoah! I found that there is still much work to do, not just maintenance.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: ric on May 30, 2016, 10:44:46 PM
back in late winter ,fast aproaching 60, i was finding cutting my toenails a bit of a challenge, a few months on i feel ive lost a bit weight and a bit off the waistline and im finding it easier to bend to cut the toenails,   if i had the time i might consider taking up yoga ,or maybe with old age aproaching i should make the time.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on May 31, 2016, 05:33:31 AM
I figure retirement or at least a period of partime is a good time to make diet and exercise the new job. It will improve the quality of the next 30 years AND these things are easily done without icky clothing, which I will be without as often as possible.
Hmm, a good career move, me thinks.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on May 31, 2016, 07:47:36 PM
Yes! I have lately been dropping tidbits of lifestyle improvements for my wife to find. Such as how crowded it's getting here and how frustrating it is with the bad traffic everywhere. A few years ago she would come back with how much she liked it here. This is where she, as a military brat, landed. So she id fond of it.

More recently she has been agreeing with me at how crowded it is.  ;)

Duane

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 01, 2016, 12:19:22 AM
As a military brat, I landed in Tucson. Having moved someplace every couple of years growing up, I stuck around. Then Tucson caught me living in a couple of other places and sucked me back as it does to some of us. There is an inertia for MB's after traveling and moving to want to stick in one place, although not a dead wanderlust by any means. I understand her inertia. I moved out of town, But not far, to find more elbow room, peace and nature. I still have the friends and family and culture here, it is just a longer drive. The city is crowded, loud, hot, and now, mosquitoes. I'll only visit. The place in town is convenient, but I'd have to live indoors.

Every so often, I think about leaving the country, moving. The potential is there, but I've yet to find a place that I prefer more.

Every time I have traveled, visiting anyplace else, I have considered moving there and come back home.  There has been living cheap in the mountains of eternal spring and pure waters of Equator, a Mediterranean island or Carribean. Six months down south and six up here. Six months up north and six here. What are your fantasies?

No matter where I go, there I am. So, focusing on health, mindful meditation, sun and naked freedom, I'll be okay about anywhere. Warm weather, mostly sunny, a variety of natural opportunities everywhere, elbow room, are all icing on the cake and a choice that I make. DF wouldn't consider leaving that granddaughter and so would I for the time being, but change happens. I can switch cultures, my base is in the immersion into nature. I'm sayin' that my posts will probably be coming out of Arizona for some years to come...unless, that motorhome a few months here a few there, come home, hang out, wander again...maybe a place with lots of water....
Jbee :)
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nudewalker on June 01, 2016, 03:56:07 PM
We have ben actively looking for that little piece of heaven on earth. Near a bigger body of water and some privacy and a downsize from what we have now. I guess it's the grass is always greener syndrome. When we start to weigh pros and cons it seems that staying here is the smartest move for the time being. As long as there are those few winter months in Florida I guess I'll survive.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 01, 2016, 08:59:09 PM
Ah yes, the snowbird, wintering. Maybe in a nude trailer community? "Goin' where the weather suits ma clothes, goin' where the weather suits ma clothes, goin' where the weather suits ma clothes, hey, hey, ain't gonna be treated this a way." Or lack of clothing and the quest for sunshine. A ramblin' free range naturist, no cares no worries....

The population of Tucson swells each fall and shrinks dramatically in late spring. Traffic diminishes. There is a sense of peacefulness in the summer, like holidays, or SuperBowl Sunday during the game.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 02, 2016, 01:54:41 AM
There was a member on TSNS that lived in a nudist retirement community. I believe his name was Marc and lived in Georgia, Alabama, Florida or somewhere over there.

Duane

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 02, 2016, 02:26:07 AM
FLA>
JBee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 18, 2017, 09:48:13 PM
Not actual bare feet, but  just noticed that Vibram.com has returned the heel strap shoes to us, due to popular demand. The have more tread, but I prefer the grip of them. You can get them in black and brown instead of goof colors that take stealth away.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on June 24, 2017, 09:59:07 PM

There was a member on TSNS that lived in a nudist retirement community. I believe his name was Marc and lived in Georgia, Alabama, Florida or somewhere over there.
Duane
Ah yes!  I remember too (having been thus prompted!).  I was searching my atrophying brain for whom that might be the other day when we were also remembering people!


John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 26, 2017, 09:42:03 PM
Yes !!!
Exercise the brain cells! Stretch those neurons.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 26, 2017, 11:45:11 PM
I stretching my feet, my muscles, my bones, my entire bodily system into health.

I ponder whether to buy one pair of the strap on heel shoes, or before they close them out again, I should buy a few more to last for the next couple of decades, especially without those obnoxious color schemes.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 27, 2017, 01:20:48 AM
Are they in financial trouble or are you just hedging?
I love my 5 Toes.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Safebare on June 27, 2017, 02:26:39 AM
STOP!!  You guys had me shopping for shoes, AND I CAN'T EVEN WALK!!

~Safebare
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 27, 2017, 06:26:06 AM
Safebare, if you’ve never tried the Vibram 5 Toes, as soon as you are able, try them out. It feels a little odd at first, but I prefer them on the trail. Walking almost barefoot gives your legs and feet a completely different type of exercise.

Depending on the type you get they will have different thickness of sole which changes the way you feel the ground.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Safebare on June 27, 2017, 05:10:50 PM
I tried them on once while shopping at Whole Earth Provisions several years ago and couldn't get past the odd feeling between my toes.  They have updated their options and styles plenty since then and the clear preference expressed here makes me want to give them another go.  Soon, I will be back walking the earth as nature intended.  My last foray, trip report to come, included a busted flipflop and an awkward hike back to the car.  Obviously, flipflops are not designed as safe hiking footwear.  Hiking boots are much more appropriate, but confining and restricting.  I have hiked plenty in all manner of footwear, including none.  Once I get rid of these casts, I will sample the 5-toes to see if they provide the balance between the freedom of bare feet and the safety of shoes, as reported.

~Safebare
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 27, 2017, 05:49:26 PM
Eyesup: My concern is discontinuation, again. They were brought back by popular demand.

There is a prompt that Safebare responded while I was writing this dissertation, but....

Yes, Safebare, they were originally designed for boating with smooth glassy classy surfaces, but then they were branched off into many uses and sole types. The original soles were designed by Vibram to better the more usual deck shoes.

DF and I love them, too. I don't loose my toenails on the downhill slopes in the mountains, anymore. They produce a close to barefoot body-mechanical action, but with some protection and cushion. I would be hard pressed to hike as I do, and without injuries, without wearing them. One thing about my truck, it needs new tires every so often, if I'm going four wheelin' on the dirt and rocks. These have outlasted the tires, but....

With the strap on the heel in the U.S.:
http://us.vibram.com/shop/fivefingers/men/outdoor/treksport/M44.html?dwvar_M44_color=Black%20%2F%20Charcoal#start=1

The ol' reminder, "I was angry that I had no shoes, until I saw the man with no feet." Your heel will be sensitive to slip these fivefingers over for a while, but teaching the system during recovery at a barefoot level, or close to it, will teach it properly, reintegrate the system all the way up into the back and body and take the stress off of the heel.

Most other shoes will make your body learn to be stiff, cripple you in motion and cause all sorts of health issues as the years go on. Recover with naked feet, love and talk with them using your hands as well as your voice. Look into Earthing, as it reduces inflammation during recovery. Never put complete trust into a podiatrist, as their knowledge is relatively simple and in its infancy, but of an extremely complex body. The body needs as natural a set of movements as you can give it for the foot to repair to a more natural state. The walking, jumping foot's mechanics are so complex as to be incomprehensible. It is like trying to intellectualize the nature of God and getting to that point of, "whoah."

In many ways you will have opportunity to maximize the rest of the function of your feet while helping that heel recover. The medical authorities and the traumatized tend to want to rely on braces and stiff shoes. Think of a babe learning to walk while in stiff shoes; most people spend their lives walking funny and unhealthy with this early training. The trick is in the transition.

When I whacked my heel, no, not shattered it like your ordeal, the podiatrist could only give me a $400 piece of rubber in my heel. There was no recovery. I went to my old time boot maker (Vic, owner of Stuart Boot Factory, South Tucson) and he diagnosed the wear of my old boots and made some new ones to compensate. It put the weight to the toes and off of the foot for a while...and then, for years. I was taller in the heels, then the back curvature issues started to arise. Using my leg muscles more and to strike toe first should have been in that program, with emphasis on my barefoot nature. Twenty, thirty years later, it took a couple of years to recover from the recovery.

Maybe, if you tell the docs that your ultimate goal is barefoot running, it will show his/her colors. If they say barefoot running is no good, get another helper, or helpers that do. The pods can operate and do all sorts of things for humpty dumpty, but after that, they are limited. You and your feet and leg motions will have to be responsible for care and intuitive exercise. That being said, before I risk sounding like I'm trying to be Doctor Goode... one word, "barefoot." I elaborate, "barefoot all over."

Just a reminder from your resources in the choir, please, excuse my spontaneous solo performance.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 28, 2017, 06:46:51 AM
The 1st time I wore them on a hike the next day I noticed,

my feet
my calf muscles
my thighs
my back

It affected that much.
It was like getting a foot massage.

Duane



Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on June 28, 2017, 03:43:17 PM
Yes, those thin foot covers are better than big clunky boots, but they are not naked natural feet. 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 28, 2017, 05:35:35 PM
If I lived in a culture where the norm was bare feet, the terrain wasn't urban asphalt, concrete sidewalks, etc., and I was out and about naked each day, I'd have naked natural feet. I do my best, but I'm indoors, or in a prickley desert, and burning summer urban places, often, when I'm out and about. My feet feel trauma often when first barefoot.

It would take quite a lot of barefoot use to get me to run down a gazelle and not shred my feet. So, I compensate and feed the problem with various minimal shoes. I go bare foot as often as I can. Out on the trail, we stop and soon, strip off the shoes.

I love barefoot all over, but I can't always be barefoot, let alone all over. Even my less than primitive home makes trouble for barefoot ends. We take our shoes off when entering our homes and that works well. I can't be barefoot outside and put my feet up and cross legs yogi style on my couch. If I'm out and about, the mess on my feet destroys furniture, towels on furniture, etc. Parking lots, and gas stations are way messy. I'd be washing my feet constantly. Some common dirt outside and a home setup on the floor are something else entirely.

The Japanese that live to be 100 live in homes without shoes, they daily have to squat down numerous times to sit on tatamys and to low tables and habachis (please forgive the spelling). Their backs get stretched and supportive muscles are regularly used. Most westerners sit up in furniture. Their clothing doesn't allow the full stretch, so they actually need the furniture. A study was done with the results stating statistically that if you can't sit on the floor and get back up without using your arms that you will be dead within five years. That seems far fetched, but actually makes some sense to me. There is much truth to it. Then, I have to consider those weird shoes that so many traditional Japanese wear.

I have given thought to creating a more traditional Japanese or primitive style home, for that reason. It is more earthy and and closer to human nature and health. This civilized living is a very new practice in human history. It needs to be rethought. Then, there is the issue of house guests. It would be very uncomfortable for may of them when visiting, a cross cultural dilemma. "Oh Lois! First they want us accepting them unclothed and now they have us sitting on the floor!"

I'm thinking that I'll be leaving Tortolita for a more urban environment. There, I'll have a dirt lot to create a user friendly environment, instead of my natural environment. There, you can bet that I'll set the outside up for barefoot all over living. Most of my time is at home. I can have a varied running surface around the house, gardens, no scorpions and rattlesnakes to watch for and create more shade.

The noise and mosquitoes will be the negative. In this coming retirement, I plan to be out naked in real nature at least two days each week on an average to compensate. Health being the priority, this should be a part of a healthy lifestyle. I have been observing one place in nature intimately and its changes for 20 years, now. I'm going for more diversity and get out of the southwestern region more often (did I hear a voice say, "Trip Report"). I want to interact more, growing rich organic foods, exploring that piece of nature that I can eat. I live in the most biodiverse of deserts, a wonderland, but it is more stark and harsh for a human being to live healthy.

I've begun working with a foundation to create a healthy clothing optional environment on the property. I want more interaction and less driving time.

There is much more to that decision, but this is the free range naturist part of it, exploring the synthesis of natural living and modern civilized practical options. 
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 28, 2017, 09:34:18 PM
What Jbee said!

It’s why when I am out and I spot a patch of desert that is clear of pricklys of any type, I immediately take off whatever is on my feet and enjoy it for a short time.

Absolutely and completely  - NAKED ! ! :D
WooHoo!!

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 28, 2017, 09:34:58 PM
Jbee, I have been noticing recently that I am slower in getting up from the floor without at least a steadying hand on something. I just though I was getting old! :)
I'm just a poor old man. I have no time for law-breakers. My legs are grey. My ears are gnarled. My eyes are old and bent.

I never considered that furniture was the culprit, I am going to test this.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on June 28, 2017, 10:10:27 PM

Quote from: jbee
I'm thinking that I'll be leaving Tortolita for a more urban environment.
WHATTTTTTT!  Surely not?  How would you survive amongst the textiles?  You'd have to lock yourself away?
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on June 28, 2017, 10:29:27 PM

Taking up Jbee's remarks about the Japanese healthy lifestyle, I saw a documentary on UK TV last night about traditional potters in Japan.  It centred around a family that had passed the art and craft down numerous generations.  The subject of the documentary worked in a business with his father who, in his eighties, was suffering from severe spinal scoliosis - he walked haltingly with a stick bent over with his torso almost 90 degrees to his legs. The western reaction was 'poor old guy' he's near the end. The film then immediately showed him settling down to his work at potters wheel and this old guy sat down on the low platform that the potters used and folded into tight cross legged seated position with one leg out to spin the wheel and began to work.  I marvelled at this.  A little later he was interviewed and his demeanour and speaking were obviously still pin sharp.  In the west we would provide aids whereby a stiff, arthritic old person might be prevented from having to bend too far or sit on the floor.  And so that westerner would atrophy further.  It was clear from this brief moment - perhaps 20 sec of the hour that the Japanese lifestyle of living on the ground on Tatami mats was far more healthy than anything we do in the west.  I shall continue my yoga!


I have to say, JBee, that I find sitting cross-legged with an upright back quite hard.  My round tummy and scoliotic back musculature tend to create the (spring loaded!) need to lean back.  I fight it somewhat unenthusiastically but it does seem to be a very 'grown in' weakness. I have to use my hands to get up therefore - Have I got less than 5 years?  Bollocks to that!  Nevertheless when we do pranayama or meditation in yoga class I sometimes kneel rather than sit cross legged then I can concentrate better not having to be distracted by extra the effort of sitting cross-legged.


John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 28, 2017, 11:57:14 PM
I began about ten years ago to try this yogi posture. It hurt and was impossible. In a week, I was able to get into position, but I was still uncomfortable. I found that doing it in a reclining chair took the strain from my back. I still prefer back support, even though the legs have been very happy through the 10 years crossed up. In fact it is preferable. The more I work with it, the better it gets. I'm sure I was capable of much quicker progress, but through the years, I've gotten better sitting like that. Still, it is more comfortable if my butt is higher than the legs. In the wild, I search out rocks that lean that way to lower my legs and can sit for long periods meditating and watching in peace. A level place doesn't last long. I have to lean forward after a relatively short time. I use a pillow, or cushion to elevate the butt often.

The spine and bone structure don't hold me up. They are a place for muscles and all associated to hang from. The muscle, fascia, etc. holds things up. It springs in equal and opposite reactions. I have had to take it easy for back injuries for like two decades, but recently the doc told me to just do old fashion sit ups, as I described in another thread today and the result is more than sciatic relief. While I'm there I stretch and integrate yoga moves and poses. It is getting easier for me to sit up cross leg. There is more muscle support, my slouch is correcting with the balance of front and back core. I can get up easier and easier from this. My cross leg preference helps, too when getting up.

I can remember sitting on tatamis in the traditional hotel in the hills at the base of Mt. Fuji as a 5 year old, not being comfortable to sit there and eat at that low table and no chairs. My body needs to be retrained and it needs muscle structure and exercise to do this after a lifetime of western civility. But, it is working and it is doable, and it will change the quality of my life dramatically to do what is more natural. I don't think that the yogi sit position is so very natural compared to a squatting position, so I do both. I am now often with discomfort sitting in a chair, however. I often wonder if people think that I'm trying to show off as super hippie when I sit in a chair cross legged, some tell me that they admire it, but it is just that it now feels better. I see squat sitting as an uncool look, still. I learned that in grade school when squatting and having some Bozo kid come by and pull me backwards. Nude, it makes genitals look like they are on display. It just isn't a usual sight in our culture. I have had female friends sit comfortably like this nude and I have had to adjust to the intimacy of it.

I suppose that it is like getting used to barefoot, or toe shoe running after a lifetime of shoes and boots. It takes adjustment and some time, but the result is amazing.

The other evening, DF and I were at a friends house. we had been swimming and had no desire to get dressed, as we sat on the couches munching and conversing. I had my sit down towel as is my naturist policy. Not only was I now using it to keep my bare butt off of the couch, but it also afforded me the opportunity to place my bare feet up on the furniture. I was uncomfortable with feet on the floor. I found that I wasn't leaning back at all. All very natural, I realized that I had spent a couple of hours like this, except to get up for another shrimp, or chip and salsa, or get more to drink. It surprised me and encouraged me. But, now I'm weird, except among my naked friends. I'll take my health and comfort and let them accept me as I am. I see others becoming unhealthy with age and with back troubles who would criticize me for my lack of conformity.

I have yoga instructor friends, who sit on the floor, and in healthy positions on furniture and are accepted that way. They look so limber, elastic, young and healthy, too.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Safebare on June 30, 2017, 04:29:58 PM
I am reminded of a scene in 'Goats' where David Duchovny's character is having a conversation with Graham Phillips character, who comments that "nude men should not squat".  It is a great scene of natural nudity.
I have always recognized the pitfalls of western furniture, but never quite came to terms with the lotus position or floor sitting.  In other words, I have lived a long life in conflict between the culture I find myself in and where I 'belong'.  I find standing for long periods, easier than any of the sitting options.  My preferred chair is a sling type.  Forced to sit in a wheelchair has impacted my reality.  The longer I sit in it, the longer I can sit in it.  It's like ice cream.  When I'm eating it, life is good.  It's not until I stop eating it that I realize how bad it really is.  Maybe coffee would offer the same revelation.  I probably will never know.

I am challenged through the words expressed in this forum.  That encourages me to push on.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on June 30, 2017, 10:29:12 PM
It might be interesting to follow the historical and anthropological development of the chair.
Was it convenience or necessity?

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on June 30, 2017, 10:56:18 PM
Was it a social distortion, where those that sit higher had a throne-like advantage? Was it for ego problems. Was it a fear of crawly bugs? What necessity is a chair, or couch?
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Safebare on June 30, 2017, 11:28:54 PM
I think furniture developed along a similar vein to clothes.  Some furniture certainly makes life easier, such as the workbench.  All other probably evolved out of the disparity from those that have and those that don't.  The thrones of royalty were not built for comfort, but to demonstrate status.  People were sitting in the dirt or on a rock, until someone decided to build a chair.  Then someone else built a chair and covered it with animal hide.  Once you built it, you certainly were going to sit on it, if only to make the rest jealous.  Now, it has become a gazillion dollar industry.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on July 03, 2017, 02:45:48 AM
I would lay odds that it began as a convenience. A place to sit and take care of your feet or footwear. Most people lay down on mats, covers or other reclining places to eat or relax after eating and conversing. Chairs were probably invented for the ‘royal person’. It just dominoed from there.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on July 03, 2017, 02:01:50 PM
I would lay odds that it began as a convenience. A place to sit and take care of your feet or footwear. Most people lay down on mats, covers or other reclining places to eat or relax after eating and conversing. Chairs were probably invented for the ‘royal person’. It just dominoed from there.

Duane

In the Roman Empire a dining room had raised benches for reclining while eating.  A dining room with benches on 3 sides of the table was called the "triclinium." 

My knees have never worked well enough to squat instead of sit.   While fancy chairs probably weren't produced until woodworking and carpentry became skilled trades, I suspect that ancestors sat on logs or stone benches when available.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on July 03, 2017, 04:58:38 PM
Went to Vibram to get those shoes. They were out of stock. Guess Vibrams executive's egos are asunder, for a stupid callus decision by now.

I did find some of the old styles on Amazon! Does rubber go bad like tires?
Jbee




Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on July 04, 2017, 10:36:12 PM
Synthetic rubber will dry out and crack if it’s hot and low humidity, like here. But it will take a while.
Don’t know how long real rubber lasts.

I used to be able to get climbing shoes that had soles made from real rubber. They were ‘stickier’ than synthetic rubber, but the lifetime on climbing shoes was short. Depending on how often you climb.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on April 04, 2018, 07:44:38 PM
Vibram is getting more correct in their lineup this year. They have three styles that fit the first concept with a heel strap that helps us with duck's feet to keep them from falling off of our heels. Trek sport, V-agua and good 'ol KSO. Google their website and the go to "shop." Sorry, I didn't check the women's.

I'm curious about the new V-agua. Tiny holes to allow water through. Is that through the sole, or a pattern helping flow from doing a hydro-plain kind of action?

They are available, but for how long?
Jbee
 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: JOhnGw on April 05, 2018, 10:10:21 AM
I've walked and worked in bare feet plenty of times but I draw the line at lawn mowing and strimming.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on April 05, 2018, 02:38:27 PM
I've walked and worked in bare feet plenty of times but I draw the line at lawn mowing and strimming.

By "Strmming" I'm going to assume you mean operating one of those edger trimmer things with the whirling nylon string or fiber.   Yes, they always throw off fast moving bits that are especially bad on lower legs.  I wear long pants when I use mine. 

As for mowing, I enjoy mowing naked and barefoot.  My mower throws cuttings out to the side, not back at my feet.  Of course feet turn dark green from walking on the new cut grass.

(http://photos.bradkemp.com/8mow9%202017.jpg)
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: JOhnGw on April 05, 2018, 03:54:06 PM
That's right, Bob.
They have been dubbed "strimmers" in the UK.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on April 06, 2018, 12:59:41 PM
Goodness, I even wear something on my feet inside the house even if I'm wearing nothing else! But that, aside from how it keeps my feet warmer, is so I won't stub my toes, which happens. But for long walks on the beach, barefoot is okay, not that I've taken any long walks on the beach lately. Then then, the beaches where I go have sand. My wife informs me that some places do not even have beaches.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on April 06, 2018, 05:13:18 PM
I am barefoot most of the time.

I live in a hot desert so I occasionally wear foot protection from the heat or the desert environment. Sometimes it's necessary.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on April 06, 2018, 06:30:20 PM
I'm more aware when barefoot all over, so I rarely stub a toe, EXCEPT for the hindrance of the dang bifocal glasses. Aside from making me put my head in odd positions and squint to get them in place, they give me a tendency to lean forward to compensate for the poor vision and I slouch. When I do stub a toe or trip, it is lack of vision in the blurry spot right in front of my feet. I wear my old non-bifocal, or contacts when I hike. I can walk around the house without glasses and have less chance of stubbing my toe.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on April 06, 2018, 10:35:47 PM
Barefoot video
https://www.facebook.com/DavidAvocadoWolfe/videos/10155043926386512/?hc_ref=ARTSYPrrx1f02S5wr_K4zVzUVNMs0esn7m-hE0fBbZ8CPwN8YiFBgcm95UUNsrdt0-Q
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on April 07, 2018, 12:54:38 AM
It is difficult for me to get enough barefoot walking in on uneven surfaces to develop effectively natural feet. I live in a hot desert, or a house, or on asphalt and concrete. But I try and I always do the next best thing if not.

I've got the sheets, the comforter, the pad for the car, the wrist cuffs for camping on an air mattress for earthing, and then I'm barefoot when possible.

I have had no trouble barefoot and having my feet dry up for many years. I have been going several hours a day in another home, and they are cracking. I think that it is the stuff that is used to clean the floor, or maybe the stuff that comes off of other's shoes. More probable, the floor cleaner...got udderbalm to working on it.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on April 07, 2018, 01:23:58 AM
I think that it is the stuff that is used to clean the floor, or maybe the stuff that comes off of other's shoes. More probable, the floor cleaner...got udderbalm to working on it. 
Jbee

Last year I attended a political meeting held in a local church, one of those big ones that looks like it was once a big box store.  After I had been there a while the carpet began stinging my feet.  They must have used some toxic or caustic cleaner on the carpet.  It wasn't strong, but after a couple of hours I was feeling it.  Shoe people never notice stuff like that.

Bob
 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on April 07, 2018, 05:16:49 AM
Toxic off gas? I'll never go back to carpet, especially when wood and concrete and tile work so well in our warm climate. It catches all of the dust and is nasty to sit, lie or workout on on naked.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on April 08, 2018, 12:40:42 PM

I'm barefoot more and more these days but mostly inside.
Outside in our damp UK climate to walk on the path or garden you get wet, dirty or muddy feet.  Whilst that's no problem to me personally...a nice squelch around the garden is nice and earthing as per Bob's video...the problem is when you get inside the house again and have to go through the rigmarole of cleaning the mud or whatever off before you go into the house.  I find this tedious and time consuming even if only a minute or two as it delays you whilst doing some other task or other so if the ground is not dry, I slip on a pair of mock crocs (like croc shoes but only costing a few pounds from a cheapo rip off store!) or clogs and just shrug them off at the door when I come back in.


I wish I was bold enough to be really bohemian and go barefoot everywhere, like Bob, but again, there are 2 good reasons I don't:  First, I'm afraid of injury.  The streets where I live are full of foot ripping hazards such as broken kerbstones and so on pls the tarmac pavements are quite hard on the feet.  Second, I just can't be bothered to challenge all the prudes and rigid conventionalists out there ("ooh aren't your feet cold?" Visitors say this to me even when visiting our house. NO! they obviously are not, dork visitor, otherwise I would be wearing shoes!!)  and again as Bob has mentioned in the past people don't like bare feet in their shops and so on - although with customary textile hypocrisy, everyone tolerates the equally or more dirty soles of shoes!


So in the warmer weather i.e. from now on I stick to some more minimal footwear as much as I can - usually Fit Flop thong sandals or other thong sandals.


I particularly like wearing thong sandals as the sun is setting and as it begins to get dark, I sing this song: "Just a thong at twilight, when the lights are lowwwwww!!!"  :D :D :D
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on April 08, 2018, 01:35:58 PM
Mud, mud, glorious mud; there's nothing quite like it for cooling the blood.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on April 08, 2018, 03:10:41 PM
I spent Saturday afternoon barefoot at my local pub with some friends. 

The weather was very rainy going and coming home, but wet sandy feet getting into your car is no worse for the car than wet sandy shoes.  Coming home I have a door mat to wipe my feet, and another washable throw rug inside the door to get any sand left from feet or shoes.  A loud noise from the car all the way there and back tells me a wheel bearing better be replaced soon.  Drat. Always something.

If bare feet are very muddy coming home they wash off almost instantly with a garden hose or faucet.  Very muddy shoes, not so much. 

The statistics on foot injuries strongly favor bare feet.  Many shoes are slippery, and falls are common.  Bare feet suffer significantly fewer ankle, knee, hip, and back injuries.  Bare feet even have special nerves that tell you when the surface is slippery so you get notice and can walk more carefully.  Shoes often leave you (slip) flat on the floor, like I ended up last year when I wore sandals to an auto parts store.  Lucky I wasn't injured.  Next time I went barefoot for auto parts. 

Having fun naked from head to toe.   I only wish the pub allowed naked drinking.  Not yet.

Bob
 
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on April 09, 2018, 08:21:22 PM
In India, we wear flip flops or bare feet. There is a mat to brush off feet, there is a place to leave shoes when entering a building. it is polite, it is custom and it is cleaner. When the shoes come off there is so much less tracked in, wear and tear to the interior, since of respect and polite, and sense of welcome and comfort.

People are invited to take their shoes off when they enter my house. They are informed of my preference. Rarely do they not, I don't push it. It is silly to expect someone to take a pair of big boots off and replace them with stinky sweaty confined feet. I'll just dust the floor later.

Mud? What is this thing called mud? The arid-zonan wants to know.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on April 10, 2018, 08:40:22 PM
Quote from: Jbee
I'll never go back to carpet, especially when wood and concrete and tile work so well in our warm climate. It catches all of the dust and is nasty to sit, lie or workout on on naked.
You should have seen the floor under the old carpet we had replaced. It was disgusting. Dirt, pollen, dead bug parts and probably human skin cells and animal dander. Piles of it.

We did install new carpet, but I’ll not do it again. I like Jbees reasons best. Natural floors are best. Even concrete, though not natural is better than carpet.

I understand in colder climes a warm floor is good, but it doesn’t get that cold here for very long.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on April 10, 2018, 08:41:06 PM
From: Bare feet
There was a song in ‘Paint Your Wagon’ about the glories of mud, Best Things (https://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/paintyourwagon/bestthings.htm)!
A good movie about leaving civilization behind.
Shoes will track in things you aren’t aware of. If we step in something, our 1st instinct is to clean it off. Obviously feet are cleaner than shoes.

I wear my Keen sandals almost everywhere that I can’t go barefoot. It’s a compromise.

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on April 17, 2018, 10:06:29 AM

Spring is finally creeping limply over the British Isles - bit of sun for a couple of hours, bit of rain, bit of cloud, bit more sun....etc.
I had my first nude breakfast on the patio yesterday but to get to the point of this thread, today is the first day it has been possible either meteorologically or sociologically to wear sandals.  Hurrah! Goodbye socks! :)    Not Keens, my walking shoes are Keens but my sandals are Fit Flops - very comfy.  Not into thong sandals yet.  If the blessed weather would get on with being more clement, I could get into those!   Otherwise barefoot in house and garden.  I am going to try some barefooting further afield in the summer if we ever get ine this year.
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: eyesup on April 19, 2018, 06:06:23 PM
I love the sensations of barefoot hiking. Total nudity, but in the desert it is a rarity.  :D

Barefoot works in the city but, well I'm in the city. So no nudity.  :(

Duane
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 21, 2018, 04:46:48 AM
I've given up walking barefoot around my home. Too many times, I've been stuck and one particularly that laid me up for weeks.
 
I'm going back into town. I'm setting up an outside run and walkways with several kinds of surfaces, to walk and run on. A playground for my feet, an exercise trail for the rest. Hoops to hang on, ropes to travel under hanging. A straight away to sprint.

A garden, trees, a wall all around, a safe nude playground with no rattlers to hop over in surprise, never having to look under my seat before I sit. 

It is a dear trade, but retired, I'll be traveling out in wondrous nature more often.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on November 22, 2018, 01:19:47 AM

I'm glad you've found somewhere that gives you the privacy you need in town.  When do you move...or has that happened already?
What's the new place like? (photos?).


Although it is now late Autumn in the UK and despite a very warm one, the chill and damp are now descending.  However, I have continued to eschew socks and worn loose fitting clogs at my various activities.  I'm surprised how many people have commented.  'Aren't your feet cold?' they ask.  'No' I reply 'otherwise I would be wearing socks!'  I have found myself on several occasions being extremely relieved when I can get home and take my shoes off and walk in bare feet again.  My body is beginning to accept bare footedness as the norm, I think. Great!
 
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 23, 2018, 04:48:10 PM
BArefoot all over is my norm and well accepted by my body. NAtural non-conformity in a textile world. Gotta go with how my body tells me.

Me, target is house on the market by Dec. 3rd. Hope is sale before end of year. I've been looking at inexpensive walls and listed properties to get a sense of the reality and the market. An on going daily process to tackle. I pray a lot.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on November 26, 2018, 01:40:09 PM
I prefer "face all over."

Flanders and Swann did a little number about mud, mud, glorious mud.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on November 29, 2018, 09:46:19 PM

Good luck with the house sale, Jbee.
I had rather got the impression that you had already bought or had a marker on the new property in town, but seemingly not.
You are probably aware that selling and buying houses are amongst the top 3 stress producers of life!
In terms of negotiation be firm but not inflexible and hang out for the very best property to move into from the point of view of being able to be naked 24/7 in or outdoors.  You'll regret it if you don't.  If it means losing a buyer for your house - so what?  There'll be another along soon.  That's the attitude I took in our last 2 moves and it paid dividends in getting good prices for both sale and purchase (although I wouldn't go so far as to tout it as a general principle - circumstances alter cases  - as the parasite lawyers say ...when they get it wrong!). 
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on November 30, 2018, 05:53:31 PM
Nakefit.com has an inquiring product for a protected barefoot experience. I found some on Amazon. I'm going to give them a try after I get out from under what's going on here.

Glue isn't too allergenic, biodegradable throw away. They might be useful at a 2 or three bucks a pop. There seems to be knockoffs and varying thicknesses, but these are more form fitting. They may be better for urban use and forests. Deserts, I 'm not so sure. For a pair of feet that don't get out all of the time to condition, this might be a compromise. Gotta give 'em a try. Good for hot and cold surfaces, I should think.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on December 03, 2018, 02:09:55 AM
Barefoot now for about 8 years. This autumn I’ve worn moccassins for two mettings (very unusual) and skiboots for a 2hr session at Chill Factors near Manchester. Most time in footwear all year was while ski-ing for a week in Norway.

Last weekend climbed 2800 foot Fairfield in the Lake District. Today I’ve just been to a craft fair, with plenty of sharp granite chippings outside and in marquee and lots of comments of ‘you’re brave’, ‘aren’t your feet cold’ and ‘have you lost your shoes’ variety. The place was packed....

Oh - and this morning managed a full naked all run (apart from the first and last 10 mins) in the foggy early morning, rainy, gloom. My feet are nicely glowing now.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 03, 2018, 08:11:09 PM
Amazing to me what bare feet can adapt to. But they seem to need so much practice.

Being barefoot in urban areas and flat hard surfaces of no variety, do you notice those surfaces giving you trouble?
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 03, 2018, 10:20:36 PM
Walking on pavement is hard enough when wearing shoes, especially concrete.

I might note here the great variety of surfaces I've walked on in the woods. Here at home, where I do most of my walking now, the trails have been muddy for most of the summer in through to the fall. We've had a lot of wet weather this year. But I also usually do a fair amount of wading, too, because where I want to go involves crossing creeks. That's not the case in the woods where I go away from home, though. Some trails are soft and padded with pine needles and leaves, while on the other side of the hill, it can be wet and rocky. Some trails barely deserve the name and involve hopping from boulder to boulder. Most are on the rough side and one has to be careful of where you step. Practically all are under the trees.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 04, 2018, 09:11:44 PM
MartinM: Amazing to me what bare feet can adapt to. But they seem to need so much practice.

Being barefoot in urban areas and flat hard surfaces of no variety, do you notice those surfaces giving you trouble? I feel pain in many parts of my body walking on flat concrete surfaces for long periods. It is redundant. It is constantly stiff and hard and there is no surface conditioning for feet and ankles. I seem to need variety, but my experience is often limited, unlike yours. So, when you have lots of urban and in the home flat surfaces, has your body adjusted, or do you think that your feet require variety to be effectively barefoot?
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on December 10, 2018, 06:31:41 PM

Well, 4 responses here!


1) Neat idea, jbee - I have just ordered some.  I will wear them whatever the weather when I have a day when I can wear them all day and will be out and about where bare feet won't attract adverse reactions i.e. not the supermarket, not where I could get a foot injury e.g. doing DIY and up ladders but yes on Yoga class day, Art class day or doing nothing day around the house garden and for a local walk.  I suppose one can be shod part the way there and take off the shoes to reveal the soles when at the walking place. 


2) I have before used another type of barefoot sole cover.  These were rigid foam soles with adhesive on the top.  I forget what they were called but they were not that great.  Once you had stuck them on they tended to lose adherence when peeled off so would flop about the next wear and if walking on cut grass or sand the grass and/or sad would accumulate around the edges and gradually work their way under the sole as it lifted slightly when walking until they affected the stickiness to the foot.  That said they were a fun way to be nearly barefoot but be able to walk on tough surfaces such as asphalt and concrete pavements


3) Wow MartinM, barefooter for 8 years.  I'd like to know more of this lifestyle.  Are you barefoot all the time of just some of the time?  Do your feet get calloused and/or cracked and if so what do you do about that, if anything?  How did you adopt barefooting early on?  Who comments or objects mostly (in the way you describe or worse - e.g. refusing entry to a store)?  I am pretty much 100% barefoot at home these days but haven't ventured out into the wide world.  I do things that even if I was 100% barefoot otherwise, I would put on protective shoes for e.g. ladder work, and building/some DIY.  I'd love to hear your story!


4) Blue Train - how do you avoid injury on the trails you describe?


John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 10, 2018, 08:05:32 PM
I was not describing barefoot hiking, you understand. I wear various kinds of boots. At home, where the trails have of late been muddy and I sometimes wade a creek, high boots of eight to ten inches have seemed the best choices. Otherwise, ordinary hiking boots.

Indians in North America in what is now the U.S. and Canada generally wore moccasins and a few wore sandals.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on December 10, 2018, 08:33:43 PM

Ah yes, BT.
I guessed you were not foolhardy enough to be that intrepid.  Wearing boots allows you to enjoy that terrain in safety and comfort.
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 11, 2018, 02:47:24 AM
I disagree Bluetrain.

They have just been pictured with those coverings by European invaders. There have been archeological reed shoes found around here, but most of the time around the village barefoot all over was more common before the invasions. Our feet are geared by nature to be effective for all uses. Snow, running off trail in cactus, these required some sole cover like huaraches. Running down animals wasn't evolutionary because we learned to use shoes.

Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 11, 2018, 02:54:48 AM
I should ditto on of Nuduke's questions. I know it was discussed years ago, but I have acquired a callus like cracking patch on the side of one of my toes.

I scraped other area, like my heal and applied Utter Balm, and got on top of it. However, the side of one big toe still has a thick nasty deep crack ugly thing going on. Perhaps being more tenacious with the scrape /Udder Balm protocol and some Epsom salt soaks. I tend to get impatient and get carried away with the scraping. I end up raw and sore.

Suggestions oh brothers of the unshod?
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 11, 2018, 12:20:14 PM
I suppose I could under most circumstances when I was otherwise nude wear nothing on my feet but I suspect I'm well past the age when I could acclimatize reasonably well. There are similar discussions among those who run about feet and shoes. At least one Olympic competitor ran barefoot. Unfortunately, she had a run-in with another competitor and did not do well. Apparently, the discussions revolve around how wearing footwear, in that case, running shoes, affects how you use your foot. I have read certain writers who gave advice about how to walk (in the woods). I had that advice in mind the other day when I was out tramping through the woods but I was unable to determine if my technique was correct or even passable. But I made it home just the same.

One thing I have noticed is that since the leaves have fallen, it's more difficult to tell where to place my foot when walking, boot or no boot. The leaves cover everything from holes, roots, limbs and loose rocks. Maybe raking the woods isn't such a bad idea after all.

In any case, I see no reason to follow what someone else did five thousand years ago regarding their feet and footwear, no more than I follow what people wear in central Africa, Borneo, or Austria, where they were those funny shoes with the shoe laces on the side.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jmf on December 11, 2018, 04:22:15 PM
At least one Olympic competitor ran barefoot.
Abebe Bikila ran and won the olympic marathon of Roma in 1960 barefoot.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_zRr9KOFWE
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 11, 2018, 04:34:29 PM
There was another one rather later.

Here, until the temperature gets down to what it's been lately, runners generally wear very little, t-shirt and shorts, but in cooler temperatures, many wear gloves.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on December 11, 2018, 05:40:52 PM
Abebe Bikila ran and won the olympic marathon of Roma in 1960 barefoot.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_zRr9KOFWE

It wasn't real Olympics unless the runners were naked.

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 12, 2018, 12:18:38 AM
I suppose I could under most circumstances when I was otherwise nude wear nothing on my feet but I suspect I'm well past the age when I could acclimatize reasonably well. There are similar discussions among those who run about feet and shoes. At least one Olympic competitor ran barefoot. Unfortunately, she had a run-in with another competitor and did not do well. Apparently, the discussions revolve around how wearing footwear, in that case, running shoes, affects how you use your foot. I have read certain writers who gave advice about how to walk (in the woods). I had that advice in mind the other day when I was out tramping through the woods but I was unable to determine if my technique was correct or even passable. But I made it home just the same.

One thing I have noticed is that since the leaves have fallen, it's more difficult to tell where to place my foot when walking, boot or no boot. The leaves cover everything from holes, roots, limbs and loose rocks. Maybe raking the woods isn't such a bad idea after all.

In any case, I see no reason to follow what someone else did five thousand years ago regarding their feet and footwear, no more than I follow what people wear in central Africa, Borneo, or Austria, where they were those funny shoes with the shoe laces on the side.
People's feet adjust pretty quickly to barefoot. Not like they have been bare all of life, but they get pretty good.

Shoes generally train a body to walk unnaturally. In many cases to detriment. The whole functions as a unit, each part adjusting to the other. Back problems, balance, sciatica, clear up to a sore neck can acquire pain from posture and shoe style. Many people have difficulty training the movement of the body to adjust to barefeet and toe to heel movements. They get sore ankles, and lower leg pain. They have to retrain.

Since I have adjusted from cowboy boot heels, I have much less back problems. I don't slouch as much. My gait is more natural, but still I have to keep working at it, because my body has been trained to adapt. I can feel the difference and feel the improvement.

So, I have reason to readjust. It is a part of my getting younger program along with diet and exercise, barefoot all over, naturally works out much more efficiently. BAck disorder and improper habits cause the spine, a corridor for everything healthy and nerves, to cause health issues in organs, etc. For example, I thought I had  prostrate something years ago. I went to a chiropractor and it was gone with one adjustment.

I am the direct result of what someone did for millenia before those modern shoes, modern clothing, the new fake food, etc. I'd feel foolish to not take note of my ancestry and turn my back on my humanity. I'm telling you that I'm getting younger.

People tend to mistake wear and tear as old age, but it is very often just ill adapted habits catching up with them.

I might add that it is certainly about the biology of belief.

Yes, bodies do age over time. That's natural stuff, but that is only a small piece of aging. Getting old, or these other beliefs are a lot about stories we tell ourselves, belief blinding us, pain and injuries overwhelming us, doctors and culture telling us something that isn't true, when all we need to do is change, and stop so easily following, believing, what others tell us.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 12, 2018, 11:17:19 AM
Cowboy boots were not made for walking but for riding a horse. However, I suppose it could be argued that riding a horse is unnatural. And likewise, those who ride horses consider walking unnecessary. But let's not get into a discussion of whether saddles and stirrups are natural or not. Or horseshoes.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 13, 2018, 06:16:04 PM
AH yes, the necessity of chaps! Is it better bareback and barearse? Chappy saddle or slimy wet horse to sit on, or just a sit towel wrapped around the horse?

That does bring to mind the heel and boot and riders opposed to foot soldiers, who had no heels, but barefoot and flat soles.

Status gave us heels. Horses gave us heels.

We walk better and are healthier without the heels. Cowboys don't like to hear that.

Heels make taller looking people. People generally like taller, so say the research studies.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 13, 2018, 08:08:10 PM
You don't need chaps to ride a horse. That's what you get from listening to Ralph Lauren. And no self-respecting cowboy would walk if at all possible. And no self-respecting four-wheeler would go hiking. I never did any nude hiking while I had a 4x4. But I didn't do any nude driving, either; never thought of it. But my particular 4x4, a 1965 Land-Rover, was cold in the winter and it always seemed to be winter.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on December 13, 2018, 10:10:03 PM

My Nakefit foot soles arrived very promptly!  They are really weird - just a thin plastic film that sticks along the sole of your foot and toes.  I imagined they would be a bit thicker than they are so that they would provide some walking protection.  It'll be odd to try them!  Can't wait for a suitable day to get out and walk the road and the sward with apparently bare feet.  You can't just try them on and take them off and store them for a later walk - they are single use items.  Although they were only about £2 a pair (I got a 3-pack) it's quite a price for a day's wear.  If one buys a £50 pair of shoes they can last years!  Certainly if a pair of 'standard' shoes at £50 were labelled to last just 25 days wear (equivalent of £50 worth of the Nakefit soles), you wouldn't consider them very good value, would you?!
But that's not the point is it.  Nakefit soles are a barrier between the desire to be barefoot and the modern environment which offers every obstacle to being barefoot.


Jbee!  Get to a chiropodist and get all the hard skin and callous pared off.  I do this 3 times a year and it prevents me having to live with cracked skin on the sole and heel.
It's a bit frightening as she (for the chiropodist is a lady) pares the skin with a surgical scalpel!  But it's painless and I have beautiful feet! (not).  For the 1st 2 or 3 days after a treatment I don't challenge them to walking on anything that might cut the softer skin under the callouses.  Between times I keep the callous from building up with sandpaper or an abrasive hard skin scraper. 


John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 14, 2018, 09:36:11 PM
Waiting for the full report in the pads, on those cold surfaces and forest floors. I want to hear about how they do in water.

Yea, at two bucks a pop, I'd have to wear them all day on special occasions. I wear pairs of my five toes hiking and for nothing else, so that's 25 days and their price is 50 plus days.

I like the way the five toes protect me from stubbing my toes.
Jbee
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on December 20, 2018, 09:45:31 PM

It'll be a bit before I wear a pair.  After Christmas I'll look for a quiet day when I can take a walk in the countryside and see if the tootsies freeze or get bogged in mud and whether the soles work on pavement.  They will get wet alright!
John
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: MartinM on December 20, 2018, 10:46:42 PM
To answer some of the questions, I will give a bit of my barefoot story.

A number of years ago, I had a problem with one of my feet, exacerbated when on long walks. A sports podiatrist diagnosed ‘collapsed metatarsal arch’ and suggested I needed orthotics, and that I first try Green Superfeet, expecting me to go back for more expensive bespoke orthotics. He couldn’t explain why anyone would develop this condition and I was not entirely convinced but thought I would try the Superfeet. In practice, I noticed no benefit and actually made my feet less comfortable.

The above set me off on a journey. An idea that had clearly lodged in my brain from a Trail magazine equipment report on minimalist equipment ‘less is more’ prompted me to move to wearing lighter boots, to walking sandals, which I used for a bit of early morning running ‘au naturel’ as well, but the breakthrough came with discovery of Vibram Fivefingers. The lightness and flexibility of these transformed my running so that I began to really enjoy it.

Despite a calf injury, which took about 6 months to properly go away, largely because I couldn’t hold off my early morning runs for long enough, I had been hooked by minimalist running. I went to an Alexander teacher who taught the benefits of barefoot walking for gait, posture, avoiding back problems. He taught me how to walk barefoot, strange at first, but very similar to running, landing on forefoot, underneath my centre of gravity, rather than heel toe walking. I also joined the Society for Barefoot Living, several of whom stresed the importance of walking completely barefoot, for at least part of the time, for feet to benefit fully from the feedback from all the nerves in the feet necessary for proprioception. Basically, the brain needs to rewire to benefit from all the extra sensation.

In 2011, I scaled Sca Fell (hightest mountain in England) in 5 fingers. The following winter I was tackling the Scottish hills in winter barefoot, when not enough snow to ski. At the same time, I was able to go barefoot at work, so was by then about 95% barefoot.

At Nudefest I did a five mile run around the camp site, including over some sharp grit over the site track. A lesson in not being macho! Although no real harm at the time, this caused a callus that slowly moved until eventually it caused a crack behind the ball of my foot. This has been the biggest problem of my barefoot career and I still have to watch it carefully. Unfortunately, with wearing shoes we have largely lost the knowledge of how to look after our feet, but avoid calluses developing if possible, and use pumice or whetever to remove them before cracks develop. Cracks can also develop around the edge of foot if skin gets too thick, so either remove dead skin where cracks developing and/or use cream.

In 2012 I achieved a challenge I set myself, walking completely barefoot over Striding Edge, a famous exposed ridge leading up to Helvellyn, the third highest mountain in England, I think. It was easier than I thought, and great fun, much more enjoyable than boots. I did it again last autumn. Climbing around other people roped up on the one tricky section and seeing their jaws drop was very funny.

The only situations I routinely use footwear is for ski-ing. I walk barefoot in snow if not too cold, not too technical eg hard and steep) and can keep moving..... Also for sailing in spring and autumn, as sat in a boat there is nothing to get the blood circulating. Occasional formal meetings I feel the need to be a little less conspicuous, and will wear my moccassins.

As for other challenges. I have had a few pubs that didn’t like me being barefoot, usually town pubs where broken glasses a real possibility, but still generally minimal risk. I have only ever once worn footwear because of their requirement. Several others I just argued the needlesness of their concern. A security guard in Tescos once cited hygiene (ridiculous) and then safety for not being barefoot but relented when I said I was responsible for my own safety. Another security guard in a megashop in Birmingham said barefoot wasn’t allowed, but when I asked a manager it was ok. One fast food place in Aviemore the obnoxious manager said ‘because I say so’ when I asked what why I couldn’t be barefoot. I was only being polite looking at the menu after nipping in touse their toilet.....

All in all, minimal problems in eight years of largely joyous barefooting. Apart from Forestry Commission tracks... They have a habit of surfacing their tracks from one side to the other with sharp, granite chippings. One reason to carry backup shoes, either Sockwas (very thin and will roll up and go in pocket) or huaraches, very hardwearing and simple.

I have rambled on far too much, but should say that barefooting is necessarily a very mindful way of walking and running. Running barefoot and naked on a beautiful fine early morning through the woods I can only describe as a spiritual experience.

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on December 21, 2018, 02:49:10 AM
To answer some of the questions, I will give a bit of my barefoot story.

A number of years ago, I had a problem with one of my feet, exacerbated when on long walks. A sports podiatrist diagnosed ‘collapsed metatarsal arch’ and suggested I needed orthotics, and that I first try Green Superfeet, expecting me to go back for more expensive bespoke orthotics. He couldn’t explain why anyone would develop this condition and I was not entirely convinced but thought I would try the Superfeet. In practice, I noticed no benefit and actually made my feet less comfortable....

 ....One reason to carry backup shoes, either Sockwas (very thin and will roll up and go in pocket) or huaraches, very hardwearing and simple.

I have rambled on far too much, but should say that barefooting is necessarily a very mindful way of walking and running. Running barefoot and naked on a beautiful fine early morning through the woods I can only describe as a spiritual experience.
I've had consistent disappointing experiences with podiatrists over the years. I've gotten better information from a boot maker. It seems like most just don't really understand the complexity and prescribe an insert, or hastily want to cut a foot up.

Oh how I hear you and it encourages me. I'll put a barefoot running walking path in my new yard with a variety of surfaces and uneven. It should do wonders to condition my body and mindfully exercise my spirit barefoot all over. It is, however, only one of a few spots to roam barefoot without potential peril anywhere near here. Maybe the San Pedro riverbed, but my feet are not well conditioned...today.
Jbee



Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: nuduke on December 22, 2018, 06:07:10 PM

Really interesting post, MartinM.
Interesting that you don't have to do much foot maintenance other than pumice and that your feet can endure any surface it seems!  My feet are prone to callusing around the heel mostly and I take care to ensure it doesn't build up because if it does the skin easily cracks.  It's just a matter of regularly scraping it off - I use an artificial pumice and sandpaper.  I get the excess skin carved off by a podiatrist 3 times a year.  I got the sandpaper tip from a previous colleague on TSNS (Graham) and I recently acquired a foot smoothing thing which is simply  12V motor with a flat disc and self adhesive abrasive discs.  Only used it once so far and it took a fair time (20 mins?) but the result was excellent in sanding down to reduce any tendency to cracking.  Needs a bit of flexibility and bodily contortion to get the disc and the sole in sufficiently good contact though!


It's also fascinating and inspiring that you can barefoot in most public places without people objecting except in the sort of cases you talk about.  I would tend not to want to walk about british town centres and high streets with bare feet as they are often so dirty.  The countryside sward is much nicer to walk on and I can't say I've tackled gravel or thick mud (yet) but as I seem o be barefooting more and more, this spring may see the liberation of my feet in more places!


John

Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: BlueTrain on December 22, 2018, 09:46:20 PM
If you went barefoot constantly, wouldn't your feet get callused over the entire bottom? I realize that may depend on where you walk but let's say you confined your bare-footing to the woods and grasslands and squishy bottomland, not rocky roads and of course the carefully maintained dirt floor of your cabin. On reflection, though, perhaps not, since, in theory, those places are all nice and soft. Well, soft, anyway.

But theory sometimes doesn't make it past reality and besides, you may not want to confine your perambulations. The trails I use or have used have been all over the place, though I suppose most could be managed well enough at the cost of reduced speed, allowing for tolerable weather. If worse came to worse, a pair of sandals might save the day and there are other options. There are sandals, sort of, called, I think, surf shoes, which are sandals intended for the wet and have toe protection, something I care about. And there are shoes intended to be worn in swimming pools to protect the feet from a sandpaper-like concrete surface, although they're more sock-like than shoe-like. And you can do what primitive and poor people all through the tropics do: wear flip-flops.
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: Bob Knows on December 22, 2018, 09:57:04 PM
If you went barefoot constantly, wouldn't your feet get callused over the entire bottom? I realize that may depend on where you walk but let's say you confined your bare-footing to the woods and grasslands and squishy bottomland, not rocky roads and of course the carefully maintained dirt floor of your cabin. On reflection, though, perhaps not, since, in theory, those places are all nice and soft. Well, soft, anyway.

The soles of bare feet become leathery, not calloused.   
Title: Re: Bare Feet
Post by: jbeegoode on February 13, 2019, 02:06:45 AM
I developed a callus and cracks on my toe particularly and more of this elsewhere. I mentioned it here a time back. The nurse practitioner suggested coconut oil. I picked up some pure organic. I use coconut oil for many purposes. I slush the stuff around in my mouth for cleaning, cook, eat, massage, sex, even take it out on the trail. The stuff is wonderfully versatile.

I applied it liberally, rubbed it in a bit. In a few days the foot eating caked stuff scrapped off (with a tool created for this), for the most part, but the cracks were deep. Two weeks and it's the cure.

There is another component of the problem. She said that the dry air contributes. I've always made a point to allow my feet all the air that I can. They apparently need some moister some of the time. Because any oil screws up my flooring, I put thick athletic socks on after applying the coconut oil, which traps air. My dear feet like it a few hours here and there.
Jbee

The Utterbalm works okay. This solution worked quickly and very well.
Jbee