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Messages - John P

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1
Trip reports / Naked Hiking Day in Vermont
« on: June 24, 2019, 07:20:38 PM »
The Solstice hike in Vermont took place as usual on the section of the Long Trail/Appalachian Trail between Wallingford and Mt Tabor. This year there were 11 participants in spite of the dubious weather, with a forecast calling for "a couple of morning showers and then some sunshine", which was pretty much what occurred. Rain the previous day meant that the proposed campout at Grout Pond didn't happen, but my friend Dan and I did camp at the Big Branch shelter near the hike's starting point, walking in under a misty drizzle. Because of that rain (and a wet week in general) the trails were muddy and flooded in places, and streams were running full. Nevertheless we were able to get by everywhere, and it was even possible to keep one's feet dry.

There were a few incidents along the way, all favorable. We passed several long-distance hikers, all clothed except one, who all greeted us politely and smiled when we reminded them that it was Nude Hiking Day. The one person we met who was celebrating the day was a woman who was wearing just boots and a bra.

Little Rock Pond is near the end of the usual Solstice hike, and it's a lovely lake with a camping area. Because it's just over 2 miles in from the road over a level trail (but rocky and bumpy!) it gets a fair number of visitors coming in just to camp, and  a caretaker lives there in a tent during the summer. He wasn't there when we passed by, but we met him out on the trail with tools to create drainage ditches, and we exchanged a few words with him, nudity not being a topic for argument. Then a short while later we passed two women and some small children, and one of the ladies said to the kids,"That's 8 naked people so far, right?" and to us, "Have fun, everyone". Finally just a few yards from the end, I passed a couple I'd guess to be in their 40s, walking entirely naked with big smiles. Apparently they'd met the first section of our group in the parking lot, a conversation about Naked Hiking Day had occurred, and this couple decided that walking naked would be a fine thing to do!

Most of us finished up at Sal's South restaurant in Wallingford, where we had a meal before heading home. Because of the size of our group, they seated us in the back room, but the waitress didn't accept a suggestion that we should dine nude. Perhaps that could be changed if we asked in advance?
   

A couple of pictures of Dan setting up his tent, taken by the light of my headlamp.



Approaching a stream which isn't usually any kind of problem to cross.

Today people had some difficulty.

Dan helped Ed across.

Unfortunately I didn't capture the moment when Richard's stick broke.

 

Then we climbed up to the ridgetop level through a misty forest.

 

 

This is the “Goblin village”, where people have piled up loose rocks.

Richard finds a map of Vermont!

There was extensive mud on the trail.

Ben after he slipped.

Dan D among footprints.

In some places we had to be agile.



Move it, pup!

 

 

Little Rock Pond.

Walking beside the lake.



As always, Dan K was first into the water. And I was the only other one who swam!

On the way out, an encounter with the caretaker, who was on the trail with tools. Nudity wasn't a concern.

Finally, in Sal's South, a restaurant in Wallingford. They seated us in the room at the back because we were a large group, but the waitress wouldn't let us get naked. We'll have to work on that.
         
         

2
Free Range Naturism / Re: newTumbl
« on: June 19, 2019, 11:56:05 PM »
So which of us here is claiming to be a middle-aged man while actually being a gorgeous babe? Could be me! Could be you!

3
Free Range Naturism / Re: newTumbl
« on: June 18, 2019, 10:56:15 PM »
Bob, TANGOTI.

I seriously question whether many, or any, of the women on porn sites are really women. Maybe there are a few giving the boys what they want to see, but I wouldn't know. What I have seen on a number of naturist sites is users who grab a picture of a pretty girl from the internet somewhere, and use it for an avatar that establishes them as female. Somehow you never see a "woman" of mature years, only young ones--that tells you something. When I see a new one, I wonder "What kind of a show will this guy be giving us?" There's no point in arguing about individuals though, when nobody can prove anything. But has anyone read the site run by "Sunnyday"? There's a long-running performance for you.

In general I think real women don't see naturist sites as very friendly, and expect to be bombarded with frightening and obscene private messages. It's a very unfortunate underside of naturism online. I hate the idea that anyone feels excluded, but at least when we have an all-male group, we have the expectation that nobody will abuse anyone else.

Now don't make me say "What did you find when you looked it up on Google?"

4
Free Range Naturism / Re: newTumbl
« on: June 16, 2019, 09:45:31 PM »
I'm not surprised at all that Newtumblr didn't work out for you. There seems to be an infinite demand for sexual material, whether it reaches the level of pornography or not, and anything that we'd accept as genuine naturist content is just lost in that seething ocean. People complain about Facebook, but I think Facebook is at least partly doing things right: by banning nudity, they're keeping the porn out. We know that there's nudity that isn't porn, but it's a tiny fraction. I can't imagine that any commercial company would consider it worthwhile to sort through the postings containing nudity, just to find the few items that aren't pornographic. Apart from the time involved, the people who do the work would probably demand hardship pay.

5
General Naturism Discussion / Re: Escapism
« on: June 14, 2019, 04:36:21 AM »
And since we were just talking about lakes:
"A lake is a landscape's most beautiful and expressive feature. It is Earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature."

No, you can't camp at Walden Pond. It's a very heavily visited state reservation, officially closed after dark. Unfortunately there was a period when the state treated it more as a recreational location than a historic one, and a beach was set up where they built a bath-house in 1947, which is still in existence. Not close to Thoreau's cabin site, fortunately! To add to the insult, there was a residential trailer park across the road (called "Walden Breezes" as I recall) and the town of Concord had its municipal dump just round the corner. Then remorse set in, and the dump was excavated and all the stuff hauled away to be someone else's problem, and the trailer park was closed down.

I'm sure Thoreau swam nude--swimsuits really hadn't been invented in his day. If I'm remembering it correctly, he also had an activity he called river walking, where he'd walk in waist-deep streams wearing only a shirt. He wasn't a naturist as we understand that term, but I think he'd have liked the idea.

Better pictures than mine:
https://fineartamerica.com/featured/walden-pond-bath-house-concord-ma-toby-mcguire.html

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Trip reports / Re: A couple of short trips
« on: June 14, 2019, 01:17:44 AM »
Yes, there's an hour or so just around the time that the sun goes down where the mosquitoes are at their worst. What discourages mosquitoes is wind and bright sunshine, but it's usually calm then. You can find them any time in cool damp spots, but late in the day (or when conditions are equivalent in the early morning, if you're so foolish as to be up and about) they'll come after you.

Favorite lakes? Oh JBG, there are so many! But First, Second and Third Debsconeag Lakes in northern Maine are very nice! See a report:
https://naturist.neocities.org/Debsconeag/debs.html

7
Introductions / Re: Hello
« on: June 14, 2019, 01:10:15 AM »
Hello Charlie, looking forward to you joining in our conversations.

JBG, he'll be dipping in the lochs. Clearly a man of fortitude!

8
Hey, you Brits had your summer, a few weeks ago. Don't be greedy.

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General Naturism Discussion / Re: Escapism
« on: June 12, 2019, 07:10:56 AM »
Here in Massachusetts, Thoreau is pretty much our patron saint. I'm impressed that you know something about him there in England, Nuduke! But it's a bit of a stretch to say he was an "industrialist and factory owner"--his father operated a pencil factory which was more at the level of a cottage industry than anything, and Henry worked there from time to time, and apparently made some improvements in the product. When he worked for money, he mostly did surveying, after his initial disastrous job as a teacher, which ended when he wasn't willing to thrash knowledge into the pupils.

I think Thoreau would be very dubious about technology. Two of his famous quotes are "We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate." And "the poor fellow who walks away with the greatest number of letters, proud of his extensive correspondence, has not heard from himself this long while." He'd be likely to tell us to get off our computers and find a way to experience the world personally!

As it happens, I got some pictures at Walden Pond on Halloween Day last year. And there's one in the visitors' center where a certain quote struck me enough that I took a picture of it. JBG, I think you'd  like the idea of nature seen as a religious experience! (The picture with the signboard was taken at the site of Thoreau's cabin, which is marked out with stone posts. Visitors leave stones in a pile as tokens of their link with the place, or something. And yes, I have swum nude in Walden Pond, years ago. Maybe I need to do it again, so I can post a trip report.)

      








10
Trip reports / Re: A couple of short trips
« on: June 12, 2019, 03:07:36 AM »
New England shows the signs of being a glaciated landscape. Those isolated boulders are called "erratics", and they're pretty common. They're chunks of rock picked up by glaciers and moved some distance, then left behind as the ice melted--often a long way from any similar rock. They make intriguing landmarks. Here's a visit to another one:



And here's a GPS track of our Hubbard Pond cruise, though I didn't remember to turn the recording function on until we'd gone part-way down the lake:



11
Trip reports / A couple of short trips
« on: June 10, 2019, 04:04:42 AM »
Last Wednesday I went off to do a solo hike around a reservoir called Dykes Pond in the town of Gloucester, about 25 miles away. Maps show trails around the lake, so I thought it might be a nice walk, and so it was. Signs say "Public drinking water supply" so no legal dip, though. And there were a few mosquitoes, oh well. Then on Friday my wife and I did a couple of hours of canoeing on Hubbard Pond in southern New Hampshire--you can see Mt Monadnock on the skyline in a couple of the pictures. This time there were no restrictions on swimming! The lake is in a state forest there, but we found that there's a youth camp on it, operated by the Audubon Society with some kind of concession arrangement. It was very quiet while we enjoyed the place, and I paddled nude a lot of the time, but judging by the row of canoes neatly arranged by the water, it looked as if the camp was just about to open for the season. No, Kathy and I don't agree on how harmful the sun is.



12
Free Range Naturism / Re: Everyday Occurances
« on: June 07, 2019, 05:19:00 PM »
I agree that a sixteen-year old girl looses all her attractiveness when she is nude.

Paging Dr Freud!

I don't actually think "textile" is an abusive term. It just refers to a person who believes everyone should wear clothes in public, and I think it's an acknowledgement that naturism isn't a belief that stands in contrast to "normal" people--rather there are two outlooks on the presentation of the body, and we need to persuade the other side, the textiles, that we aren't trying to do anything harmful. In fact, we're hoping nudity will be considered part of the "normal" set of human behavior, every bit as much as the textile outlook is treated now.

I think it's true that skimpy clothing has the effect of fetishizing the body parts which are covered. With modest clothing, it's possible to say "the body is covered". But when almost the whole body can be seen, your attention is drawn directly to what's hidden. But we can't deny that it's what we're used to seeing. So girls in tiny bikinis are an "Everyday Occurance" if you aren't too fussy over spelling, and yet at the same time, if we think about it, there's quite an exhibitionistic display there. But is it really exhibitionism if you're seeing it all the time?

Damn, it's tough being a philosopher. You never get a moment's peace.


13
Trip reports / Re: Pinea
« on: June 03, 2019, 01:09:50 AM »
A Frenchman once told me that "un pantalon court" is "un short", singular not plural. French is consistent, even when it's English!

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General Naturism Discussion / Re: Incredibly funny joke
« on: May 29, 2019, 05:20:47 PM »
Oh now don't be coming to me for any explanations. I passed along a joke which I got a laugh out of, and people went off into all kinds of irrelevant directions, and they wouldn't listen when I tried to stop them, so none of this is my responsibility any more.

15
Free Range Naturism / Re: Golden Rules
« on: May 25, 2019, 07:50:26 PM »
Here in the east we don't need to worry much about dangerous wildlife. As BlueTrain says, bears are quite common, but attacks on humans are very rare. I used to say "I've seen bears twice, and both times it was a furry rear end disappearing into the woods". But then as we drove on a dirt road in northern Maine, my wife and I saw an adult and a cub ambling across in front of us. Because we were in the car, my wife was able to think it was fun instead of scary! It's true that back in 2014, a man in New Jersey took a picture of a bear, and within a few minutes, that bear killed him.
https://www.nj.com/passaic-county/2014/11/hiker_snapped_pictures_of_bear_before_fatal_attack_in_west_milford.html

But Homo sapiens sapiens, now that's a really dangerous animal, and they're everywhere. May seem friendly, but they're highly unpredictable.

Hey BT, did you hear about the bear in Arlington a few days ago? Ha ha, Arlington, Massachusetts. But that's 8 miles from downtown Boston.
https://boston.cbslocal.com/2019/05/17/arlington-massachusetts-bear-police-news/

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