Author Topic: Golden Rules  (Read 1338 times)

BlueTrain

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #30 on: May 31, 2019, 02:41:12 PM »
I have seen posts on other forums that claimed that packs of wild dogs were a serious threat in places and even feral cattle. I don't know if someone was pulling my leg or not but I have never heard a first hand account of such a thing. One certainly hears reports of dog attacks, though, but not wild dogs. I do not think coyotes are large enough individually to be a threat. I'm pretty sure I have seen one in the western part of the county about 20 miles from where I live. (Near Dulles Airport for those familiar with the area).

I had totally forgotten about irritating plants, including nettles, poison ivy and "stickers" of all varieties. But as I mentioned above, I try to avoid brushing up against the greenery because that's how the ticks hitch a ride. Mostly it isn't a problem, though, either when staying on the trail or under the trees were there isn't much undergrowth. In some places I used to hike either nude or in shorts, there were lots of low briers of some sort and my legs and ankles were always getting scratched up. Long pants and boots eliminate those problems entirely, of course, but they defeat the purpose. Those problems are present all year long but in cold weather the insects aren't so much of a problem. They don't seem to ever go away entirely, however.

This is all in places with lots of trees, bushes, grass and wet, muddy places with (these days) plenty of rain. I don't know what conditions are like in the Southwest. I did get in a little nude hiking when we were on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon but that was just one visit. I don't remember any insects and it was dry, in spite of a hailstorm while we were there.

Davie

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #31 on: May 31, 2019, 04:38:20 PM »
I have seen reports of cattle trampling people but usually they are just curious. Bulls can be dangerous too. The most frightening experience I've had recently was stopping at the top of a fairly high hill for a bite to eat. It was a glorious day and I was naked. After taking a bite out of my sandwich I heard a buzzing noise. A swarm of bees decided to descend to the top of the hill. I moved - fast!

Fortunately the bees didn't follow me and after a few minutes buzzed off and normality returned.

Davie  8) 

jbeegoode

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #32 on: May 31, 2019, 05:20:01 PM »
I've never heard of a coyote attack. They are generally solo. I hear them in packs very often, but almost always at night. They will pick on critters smaller than them and go for the young. They aren't all that big themselves. They do roam around during the day, that's how I regularly see them. 

I like this, "Coyote attacks on people are very rare. More people are killed by errant golf balls and flying champagne corks each year than are bitten by coyotes."

Being nearly harmless, Their odd behavior may be caused by rabies. I was always made afraid of coyotes and dogs when I was a child in New Mexico, just because of the rabies factor. The adults made it sound like it was all around. It is rare. It does happen. Coyotes will just shy away, or take off. I see them crossing the road. They don't hang out there. I see them out my window, they are passing through, or hiding. If one didn't do that, I'd look for foam on the mouth.

Being in the middle of a group of coyotes, I imagine, would be a scary thing. They would be alarmed and those howls multiplied and amplified would be a true spook in close proximity. I have had them howling on my property maybe forty or 50 feet away and dang it feels real. I would expect them to scatter, if I walked into them, unless they had some food in the middle of them. Still, most likely they would be evasive, if I was stupid enough to mess with them like that.They are in the business of pets. They like to lure dogs away with a bitch in heat, then attack in a group, which is common.

Mountain Lions/cougars/pumas may attack livestock. Perhaps the woman on horseback was mistaken for livestock. Lions will attack anything that they perceive is running away. They seem to know enough to stay away from humans and run away. Internet statistics say that the odds and probabilities are nil that they would attack humans. They can be huge athletic and intimating. They have been running away whenever I have encountered them. I more often smell them, but don't see them. I avoid them, if I can. They are out there making a living. They don't take risks.

Statistics on Lyme's disease wasn't even taken until fairly recently, so says the internet. It is pretty rare in Arizona. "Although Lyme disease is not present in Arizona, there are still cases in Maricopa County from residents who have traveled to an endemic area or relocated to Arizona from an endemic area. On average, there are about 1-10 confirmed or probable cases of Lyme disease each year in Maricopa County. All of the confirmed or probable cases were exposed outside of Arizona, in areas where Lyme disease is endemic."

Dogs get ticks here, but not the lyme ones.

I just never think about ticks. I notice critters on me because I am nude. I give them little safe harbor. Crawling around in the muck getting errant golf balls in Virginia as a kid certainly got me some ticks, but I stay naked and stay out of places like that, now. Poison ivy stops growing at around 5000 ft. in Arizona, up to 8500 ft. in Colorado and New Mexico. Here it is just in very wet riparian areas and most of these are gone. If I'm in one of those, I try not to brush against plants, or stay away from them and on a trail, because who is under those plants is of more concern. "Because uroshiol is only found in resin canals, a plant must be bruised or attacked by chewing/sucking insects in order for the allergenic agent to be on leaves or stems. Uroshiol does not occur in pollen."

We don't have brown bears here. We have only black bears.

It would seem that Arizona is pretty user friendly, other than rattlers and scorpions.

Bees? There was the killer bee scare years ago. They got bred out. There are swarms in the spring that get my notice when I'm plain naked, but they are always in a swarm and high above. They stop me cold. I just stand and listen, alarmed. There has been no risk yet, with numerous swarms over the years. The local bees, look different than the usual yellow stripe folk. Saw one with the typical look and a brown Mohawk last week. It came across as pretty mellow.

There are many crawly things in the night in Arizona nature. I prefer a net tent, or bivy, instead of cowboy camping. Some of them will bite. There are ants. If we stop to eat a snack, we find a rock to sit. I put down a piece of cloth. Often, the ants will come out eventually, if a few aren't discouraging us when we arrive. That is why people are meant to squat-sit, I suppose.
Jbee
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 05:29:45 PM by jbeegoode »
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BlueTrain

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2019, 06:20:01 PM »
I forgot to mention in my previous post that I was lucky enough this morning to see two foxes and I think they were two different ones. One of them I saw was chasing a squirrel in my back yard, which is a first (the squirrel got away). A week or so ago I saw one and followed it down the sidewalk for half a block. It had caught a chipmunk. And a few days ago, I saw a raccoon, moving faster than I thought raccoons moved. The first fifteen years we lived here, we did not see wildlife like that. Or maybe we just didn't notice them. Once in a very great while I'll see a snake.

None of them are particularly dangerous, except for some snakes, although some of them can make a nuisance of themselves sometimes.  But some places, people will try to kill anything that moves. It's called "sport."

Peter S

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #34 on: May 31, 2019, 11:44:55 PM »
When Iíve been walking lately Iíve noticed the sheep getting very curious. Once they used to run away, these days they stop and stare. Itís a bit spooky.

Cattle can be a problem because even if theyíre being friendly a half ton or so of prime rib can do a lot of damage. Cows are only a risk if you get between them and their calves. A herd of bullocks is worst, a bunch of bored and curious teenagers that like to run around. Iíve also been followed around by over-curious horses nudging my rucksack in search of treats.
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Davie

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #35 on: June 01, 2019, 12:17:44 AM »
Just watch out for the sheep. These were keeping a close eye on me whilst at a naturist venue.

Davie  8)

nuduke

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2019, 07:10:53 PM »

Very disapproving looks from the sheep, Davie.  I'm not surprised they are cross - naturists do them out of their business - we don't need any wooly jumpers!


On the subject of bears (not bares) - in Canada last year I was strongly advised to go out hiking in the woods with a Bear Spray.  I suspect this is because the hotel we were at had a camping shop and did a roaring trade in massively priced bear spray!  Never used it thankfully although I came across a couple of bear scats on my relatively short hike.   I sold the spray to another hotel receptionist further on in our tour.  No shop there but the receptionists did a small pocket money trade for hikers out of that hotel in 2nd hand Bear Sprays!!  Recycling at its best :)
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #37 on: June 03, 2019, 07:38:28 PM »
Yes, those nine sheep look like a football line up ready to go on the offense. There are not many sheep. I've seen sheep do this stare thing up in Navajo country.

There are too often cattle running on leased Federal and State lands. The males have been fixed and show no aggressive attitudes. They spend so much time alone, they often bolt away. Cattle gather around vehicles looking to be fed. Their paddies can be a hazard, and create flies. Their trails can mislead a hiker. Overall, they just crap out the natural experience, destroying the ecosystem and watercourses.
Jbee



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nuduke

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Re: Golden Rules
« Reply #38 on: June 08, 2019, 01:24:34 PM »
YThe males have been fixed and show no aggressive attitudes. Jbee

I would argue with the term 'Fixed'.  Hardly a repair! :(
John