Author Topic: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest  (Read 1415 times)

pjcomp

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #60 on: June 12, 2018, 06:10:24 AM »
Itís all in the genes. For a long and healthy life, choose your parents wisely.
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Bob Knows

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #61 on: June 12, 2018, 03:14:17 PM »
I do a recommended starvation, often. I fast around three times a year for a various amounts of time. There is a spiritual component in there, too. I don't eat until noon often and daily, I have a smoothie in the morning, until afternoon. It keeps me cleaned out on many ways. There is a positive difference, which points to healthier benefits and longevity. No exact prescription. I make sure that  get strong nutrition. Dr. Gabriel Cousins is my guide on this. I've read some of the referenced research connected with this theory, with his lead. As hunter gatherers, we would have less regularity. 
Jbee

A while ago there was a magazine called "Prevention" that published much of the same advice about nutrition, healthy living, exercise, etc.   One night the publisher was on late night television explaining to the host how his natural and healthy lifestyle was going to allow him to live a lot longer than the TV host.  It may have been the Dick Cavett show which played opposite of "Tonight." (It has been a while)  Late night TV was still being done live and in front of a studio audience.  The Prevention Magazine publisher had just finished his explanation of ways to live long by leading a healthy life style when he suffered a massive heart attack and fell over dead on the stage.  After some seconds of stunned silence they found that there was a doctor in the audience, but there was nothing that could be done to save him. 

This story shows that we just never know.  Life is a risk.  Live each and every day as if it is our last.  Suck all the pleasure out of life while we can.  There are no promises of tomorrow.  Carpe Diem!
 
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jbeegoode

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #62 on: June 12, 2018, 07:47:17 PM »
I've got the good genes. But it isn't all genes. I had a friend who came from that Russian area where people will live 125 years. He abused his body, obese, everything and dropped dead in his kitchen with heart attack at just eighty-five. (WHat's 'ol Jbee gettin' at???) It is more to optimize a sense of health and youthful dexterity, to ward off the diseases that get to people in a modern age.

I lived most of my life on edge, as you say Bob, smoking two packs of Camel regulars, drinking day and night, fun drugs, risk taking and every so often someone sees me from back in those days and says how they can't believe that I'm still alive. I'm usually healthier than them, but I know that it was catching up with me. A change had to happen, and now I feel and function so much better. With the age thing, I have to take time out and work at it harder, but life quality is so very much better.
Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #63 on: June 13, 2018, 06:51:22 AM »
We have books. We have books, everywhere. Every room in the house has books except the laundry and bath rooms. I donít understand why people donít like books. Also, I probably have as many albums as I do books. Albums take up less space though.

I have mentioned before that I donít shop. I buy. I know what I want and when I go into a store I get that, buy it and leave. Books and records? No way. Thatís the only thing I do shop for. I can spend hours in a used book or record shop. I had a used books/records shop in Houston I frequented. It was in an old supermarket down in the Montrose district. Probably 15-20,000 sq.ft. of used books and records.
Browsing. Bliss! :)

Duane

P.S. Maps. I love maps too.

eyesup

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #64 on: June 13, 2018, 06:51:51 AM »
Wine helps to improve digestion, especially red wine. It has antioxidants in it. Good to help lower cholesterol.

Itís like hearing those public service announcements where they interview that 185 yr. old lady in France that has had a cigarette and a glass of red wine everyday of her life. I agree with pjcomp, itís probably genetic. Some people can do it, some canít.

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #65 on: June 13, 2018, 06:52:12 AM »
Fasting is a form of meditation. It keep you focused you on what you have decided to concentrate on.

Duane

BlueTrain

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #66 on: June 13, 2018, 12:40:37 PM »
Alas! There are few used bookstores anymore. Even the old one at the beach (Outer Banks of N.C.) is gone. Even all the army surplus stores are gone, too, which is even worse.

I barely understand fasting (the point, that is, not what it is). But I also don't understand prayer, meditation and a whole bunch of other things, including how I can sit here at the kitchen counter, fueled by coffee, and do this and a so-called laptop computer. Works better on a table anyway.

John P

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #67 on: June 13, 2018, 09:22:57 PM »
Now I'm thinking of this old cartoon, by Charles Addams (of Addams Family fame), from the New Yorker in the 1970s some time.

The caption's a little difficult to see (if you have middle-aged eyes, ha ha). It says "To...hell...with...yogurt".




eyesup

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #68 on: June 14, 2018, 01:49:03 AM »
There are still a couple of used book shops here. They are fewer and smaller. The ones still around tend to be older, established and well known. The ďAmber UnicornĒ is one that was old and here when I arrived 32 years ago.

Still, Alive and Kickiní.

The fast, BT, is to remind you to think, meditate or concentrate on whatever you are focused on. Every time you notice that you are hungry, it reminds you why you are doing that. Itís a personal activity equivalent of wearing a religious token. A cross or other symbol, for instance. Although it doesnít have to be religious in nature.

Also, not everyone that intentionally thinks on an issue or problem needs to meditate or fast. I can sit and think on a problem or even do it while Iím busy with something else. Iíve never fasted, but I might find it helpful.

Who knows?

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #69 on: June 14, 2018, 01:49:42 AM »
I like that one, John!
Anytime The Addams Family is mentioned, I laugh! I always remember in one of the shows, the camera switched to Lurch (Ted Cassidy), leaning out of the top window on the cupola with what appeared to be a large butterfly net.

He looks directly at he camera and says, ďPterodactyls!Ē
Of course! ;D

Duane

Bob Knows

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #70 on: June 14, 2018, 02:23:02 AM »
Mention of the Addams Family and nudism together reminds me of my naked trip to the cemetery.   Yes, I know it has only one "d".  But all the same....

Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
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nuduke

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #71 on: June 25, 2018, 12:19:59 AM »

Quote
We have books. We have books, everywhere. Every room in the house has books except the laundry and bath rooms. I donít understand why people donít like books.

We used to have rooms full of books and decided to slim down our 'library' when we moved house in 2015.  Mrs N and I reflected why we both considered the collecting of books to be such a desirable object.  It dawned upon me that the accumulation of books is a middle class affectation that suggests you are 'well read' i.e. the number of books is in direct proportion to how intelligent and knowledgeable you are!  People with books are the people to know, perhaps.  We liked the message that we were a bit academic.
Mrs N had to agree that for us this was probably true and we both reacted against the shallowness of that.
This realisation spurred us on to more ruthless editing of the book collection.  Nevertheless it was surprising how many books did mean something more to us than just the information or entertainment they contained or their 'lifestyle' value.  So many books carried a connection to some part of life or an assortment of memories.  I kept a couple of children's books that my kids had enjoyed me reading to them.  Those books had happy times with the kids adsorbed into the pages and reminded me of it very strongly.  I kept my text books from my A Level metalwork because that was a nice time in my life and I loved doing the metalwork.  No harm in a few books after all provided you are not keeping them for appearances alone.  We chucked out or gave away about 2/3 of the books and felt cleansed and happier without them.  Our collection continues once again to increase, however!
John
« Last Edit: June 25, 2018, 12:21:49 AM by nuduke »

BlueTrain

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #72 on: June 25, 2018, 01:10:24 AM »
I visited relatives in southern West Virginia a few weeks ago. Nary a book in sight.

We have too many books and too much other stuff, too. I keep telling my wife that if we ever move, we need a place with a barn.

jbeegoode

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #73 on: June 25, 2018, 03:09:14 AM »
Yea Nuduke, I'm going through that now. I have mostly non-fiction spanning interests a over decades. They are reference materials for me. Many are marked with highlighter. I can't keep all of that information locked up in drawers in my brain. As it is needed, it tends to come back, but much has to do with applying old thought and concepts to new. I can go back to nearly any of these books and run through the highlighted areas where I studied before and long forgotten wheels begin to turn and I recall. Everybody forgets incredible amounts of info or tends to rearrange the reality of the time. I also often need to cite and get a more perfect recall. So, unless I intend to never again drop into some topic, I keep my reference. I've also got a less well organized library on my hard-drive and backup.

I love books, but more and more often, I'm finding easier access to the information on the internet. Still, More in-depth recall is best. Internet can not replace well read study.

I have kid books, too, within those are hopes for relived and tradition to pass on to grandchildren. I'm going to loose a lot of weight with those text books that were kinda irrelevant, but required, when I got my degrees.

Then, there's those that you pick up once in a while one afternoon every several years, like that Ferrarri photo book that once gave me an erection. ::)

So, what about all of these National Geographics? What about those old 1948 Britannica that show how ignorant we once were, but also give scholarly detail which is less and less common? 

Then, there's my collection of "N" Magazine, "Clothed with the Sun", going back to the mid-eighties, when I became a member. There is amazing scholarly nude information in those older issues edited by Lee Bauxendal. (spelled that wrong)

Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Whetstone Weekend: Part III Oaks in the Forest
« Reply #74 on: June 26, 2018, 07:09:34 AM »
We periodically do winnowing of our books. Every time we do it, we donate them to the local library. If I donít want them, I give them to those that can. I have books I bought over 30 yrs. ago and have got rid of books I bought last year.

If I still had every book I ever bought, I would need a 3 story house. Many books I keep from years ago simply for the memory of the 1st read. Many I have read multiple times. We also have several, ďto read stacksĒ. My eldest sister taught me to read before I ever began school. I had a couple of teachers in grade school that were Ďput out Ď because they had to find more challenging reading for me.

My favorite bookstore ever, ďThe Tattered CoverĒ, in Denver, Colorado. Three stories and a basement of nothing but bookstore. One whole floor of nothing but history. Heaven! Although I have yet to read and finish a biography, theyíre too self-centered. ;D

ďOutside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Ē - Groucho Marx

Duane