Author Topic: French Pyrenees  (Read 108 times)

jmf

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French Pyrenees
« on: October 10, 2018, 07:20:46 PM »
On my blog, some words and pictures of a week of naked hiking in the pyrenees mountains, in France
http://www.randonnues.fr/?p=5429
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

jbeegoode

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 08:22:03 PM »
There doesn't appear to be much trail in many of the photos! Did the trail disappear in spots?

A fine trip.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jmf

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2018, 11:19:08 PM »
It's not trails, it's only paths
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

eyesup

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 05:35:12 AM »
That happens to me sometimes. Many of the ‘trails’ are actually animal paths. They’re too narrow for human feet. I’ll be out in an area less traveled and the trail will just disappear. I have to stop, step back and look at a wider area to see if I can distinguish where it picks up again. Occasionally I’ll see where it reappears. I don’t like walking across the unmarked desert unless necessary.

Duane

John P

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 02:28:44 PM »
If I could add a note from a bilingual person, Americans tend to say "trail" under circumstances where you'd be more likely to say "path" in the UK. Think of the long-distance walking routes in America--the Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail and so forth. Whereas in Britain, you have the England Coast  Path and the Offa's Dyke Path. Say "trail" in Britain, and there's likely to be some assumption that you mean a wider route, maybe big enough for a vehicle. I believe JBG meant that he couldn't see what Jacques was walking on, that there seemed to be nothing there at all. But there apparently is a path, just not easy to see in the pictures.

jmf

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 04:44:55 PM »
a "piste" in french  is wide enough for a 4x4 vehicle, I translate it by trail
a "chemin" is wide enough for pedestrians walking side by side, for me it's a path
a "sentier" is only wide for a pedestrian, is it a footpath?
a "sente"  is barely perceptible...what is it?
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

jbeegoode

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 09:11:50 PM »
It is the nature of nature to grow back and make paths, or maybe sentier disappear away. I see this everywhere is Arizona, in wilderness especially. The  Forest Service has had its funding cut back gradually over decades now, a political issue. There are things that are recognizable, where a path used to follow. I look for these when the path/trail fades. It is also true that many paths started up the same way, as animal paths and became trails and are still called trails. The expression, "Out on the trail" is a broad thing. A trail can be any type of route. A trail can be a cow, or animal path that man has adopted. A trail can be...well, the street that I live on is called a "Trail." It is rural and unpaved. "Old Spainish Trail is on the southeast side of the Tucson VAlley. In history, it was once that, but now is paved and in some places with multi-lanes. The "Arizona Trail" is sometimes a forest service road, but a couple of weeks ago, we we're walking along an overgrown, rocky path that was a piece of it.

In this week's post on my website about the waterfalls, we had to walk what I would call a trail, or a path. I was walking over slabs of exposed bedrock, to find a spot where the ground of grass and dirt was worn to piece together the "trail." There were also necessary cairns to mark the trail.

All clear as mud.
Jbee

A path can be something in a garden, but it is usually a footpath, a conveyance from a point to another, and relatively thin.
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2018, 11:31:17 PM »
Quote from: jmf
a "piste" in french  is wide enough for a 4x4 vehicle, I translate it by trail
a "chemin" is wide enough for pedestrians walking side by side, for me it's a path
a "sentier" is only wide for a pedestrian, is it a footpath?
a "sente"  is barely perceptible...what is it?
A life journey? Quest? Odyssey! :D

Duane

BlueTrain

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2018, 03:02:14 PM »
Where I live, a trail will remain visible for a long time if it's under the trees where brush and grass do not grow much. In places, mostly in the distant past, a trail might even be called a road. And many of today's highways started out as a trail. There are also places that have largely been abandoned as places where people live or have farms, typically are now various kinds of nature preserves or so-called wildlife management areas, which are in reality public hunting and fishing preserves. In those places, the old roads remain evident for decades, as do temporary roads for logging and when highways are relocated. Those old roads, more often dirt and gravel than paved, make excellent pathways for hiking, especially when they are shaded, as they will eventually become. It is astonishing how much of the countryside in places distant from large cities has been abandoned and is returning to forest lands. I'm not sure if that's good or bad.

rrfalcon

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2018, 04:39:20 PM »
a "piste" in french  is wide enough for a 4x4 vehicle, I translate it by trail
a "chemin" is wide enough for pedestrians walking side by side, for me it's a path
a "sentier" is only wide for a pedestrian, is it a footpath?
a "sente"  is barely perceptible...what is it?

A "sente" might be called a track in the US. That was the word that first came to mind, at least. However, I'm not a hiker, so I'm quite willing to be corrected if somebody has a better term.

nudewalker

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2018, 05:06:09 PM »
Many of the trails close to me are what are termed as singletrack which mountain bikers use so they stay open and do not overgrow.  I have had more enjoyment going to parks where the state has been mowing trails for snowmobiling. Jbee commented on them when I did post some pictures as they are about as wide as a railroad and mostly grass. So not only can one be naked but also barefoot!
"Always do what you are afraid to do"-Emerson

John P

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2018, 08:05:49 PM »
A guy on the APNEL site just posted a report of a Pyrenees walk (APNEL is the French initials for "Association for the Promotion of Naturism in Liberty"). But he did it alone, back in the spring.

Jacques, do you ever walk with APNEL people? I thought you might prefer being alone like Olivier, but you evidently did walk in the Pyrenees with a group.

https://www.apnel.fr/forum/viewtopic.php?id=1304

Badly translated, he said:
Hello everyone

From March 9 to April 10 I crossed the Pyrenees from east to west by the GR 11 (Spanish side). [Note: he means he walked the length of the mountain range, from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic!]

This crossing was made 80-85% naked, the remaining percentage being the crossings of villages, towns, approaches to shelters, some very busy car parks especially the weekend ...

Throughout these 700 to 800 km, I have not encountered any problems with anyone with regards to my outfit. There were people watching their shoes as they passed me, those who didn't care, some but too few who congratulated me for this way of hiking, to one person who moaned to see me naked when he met me (but he did it in Spanish and as I do not speak it ...). And also the one who met me and took pictures of my back, those who smile. In short it was great. My only regret is not having met someone else who was hiking like me.

The only naked person I saw was the day after my arrival while walking along a coastal creek. The person was naked near the water and when he saw me, he almost hid while I walked naked as usual. Bizarre !!
Do not hesitate to do this kind of trip or part.
See you soon,

Olivier


jbeegoode

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2018, 08:57:29 PM »
Going back in 10 months to do it again!

500 miles is a long trek. I wonder about the terrain. It is all pretty remote by the map. I'd like to hear more.

DF and I, mostly me, have discussed doing the Arizona Trail naked to celebrate 70 years. We'd wouldn't consider doing it without pack animals, so much water would need to be carried. Two old farts might get funding for it...probably need three pairs of shoes for starters.   :D

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jmf

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Re: French Pyrenees
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2018, 10:29:52 PM »
A guy on the APNEL site just posted a report of a Pyrenees walk (APNEL is the French initials for "Association for the Promotion of Naturism in Liberty"). But he did it alone, back in the spring.

Jacques, do you ever walk with APNEL people? I thought you might prefer being alone like Olivier, but you evidently did walk in the Pyrenees with a group.


I'm a member of Apnel. But apnel is not really organizing naked hiking. Its role is rather to organize events to publicize nudity in the public space. But of course many members of the apnel hike naked.
I am also a member of an association of naked walkers which is very officially registered and which is affiliated to the French Federation of Walking Hikes: Les Marcheurs Nus du Val de Roanne in the Drôme department.
But I also continue to hike naked alone, as today: a 6h50 hike including 6h30 of nudity.
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!