Author Topic: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs  (Read 224 times)

jbeegoode

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Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« on: October 22, 2018, 10:13:45 PM »
A hike/walk out exploring what we had seen earlier from a distance.
 
I mess up on on a primary naturist rule in 101, but things hash out okay, eventually.

Hiking in the desert sun.

https://thefreerangenaturist.org/2018/10/22/free-range-101-at-the-hot-springs/
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2018, 06:37:19 PM »
Jbee, Iíve made that same mistake a couple times too. I take a small cooler that has bottles of water, electrolyte drinks and small energy snacks in it just for that reason.

Those mud hills look familiar. There are many sedimentary landscapes around here that look just like that.
We use to go to Panaca, NV to Cathedral Gorge State Park, that was mostly those types of cliffs. Itís easily accessed and usually busy with snow birds. I never had a good naked opportunity there. I hiked up to the top of a bluff once and thought it would be a good spot but it ended up right next to a highway. In a rural farming community in eastern Nevada mostly settled by Mormans, I hesitated. Would have been nice though.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2018, 08:09:04 PM »
That's the stuff! We had a mini Gorge experience. The geologic history correspondes with the Gila River valley where we were. Lake bed, sediment, etc.

There wasn't much out there, flora-wise. There was lots of fun and interesting geology and that sense of wide open spaces and freedom.
Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2018, 01:25:55 AM »
Yeah, there isnít much growing there. Itís barren in the formations.

When we travel east on I-70 we pass through the San Rafael Swell in Utah. Mrs. E calls the color of the soil near the interstate as ďbileĒ yellow because there isnít very much organic matter in it. That is a place with very little in the way of plant life.

Those clay formations at Cathedral Gorge have nothing growing anywhere. But as you can see from some of the photos, you can walk right into the slots and stand inside them. Itís a good ten degrees cooler. When the kids were little, they loved to play in there.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2018, 07:39:47 PM »
This place had a pile of organic matter on top with a creosote forest cover, which retards most of the other species, but for a few low lying plants in the rainy season.

I love geology in nature...naked.
Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2018, 08:35:28 PM »
Yess! ;D  :)

Duane

Bob Knows

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2018, 12:39:53 AM »
Yeah, there isnít much growing there. Itís barren in the formations.

When we travel east on I-70 we pass through the San Rafael Swell in Utah. Mrs. E calls the color of the soil near the interstate as ďbileĒ yellow because there isnít very much organic matter in it. That is a place with very little in the way of plant life.
Duane

I've traveled through southern Utah numerous times but its usually been trips between Albuquerque, NM, and Washington State.  The route follows I-70 only from Crescent Junction to Green River.  Then I turn north again on Utah route 6 toward Price.  Sometimes the dirt is blue from copper or turquoise.

That picture of the San Rafael Swell is a lot like much of the landscape in Utah, raw and dry, but cut probably by Ice Age floods.
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

eyesup

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Re: Free Range 101 at the Hot Springs
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2018, 08:50:27 PM »
We have geology books about the area we carry on our road trips. From the Grand Canyon to the Escalante and up through Bryce Canyon and on over to the Rafael, you can check the formations against the texts to see where in the geologic history you are passing through. Is that geeky or what! :D

But it is fun and interesting. No where else in this country can you actually see the geologic record displayed right in front of your face.

Duane