Author Topic: Naturist blogger  (Read 636 times)

Naturistplace

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Naturist blogger
« on: February 04, 2019, 03:19:44 AM »
I've been active in naturism for about 40 years, in "real" life and online. I have a naturist blog and website (since 1996), because I like to promote naturism and share information about it with others. I'm currently a member of TNS (since 1990) and formerly of AANR. I belong to two non-landed naturist clubs in California. I've been active in naturism online since the days of CompuServe (1990s). Besides my blog I discuss naturism online at Facebook, Twitter, and several other naturist social networks. In the past I've managed other naturist discussion groups. During the summer I enjoy hiking and camping the naturist way, and I visit clothing optional beaches and skinny-dipping spots.

Bob Knows

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2019, 06:05:08 AM »
Welcome to the Free Range forum.
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

jbeegoode

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2019, 12:55:59 AM »
From what I gather in three articles on your blog and this, you have been primarily a landed club naturist. Do I have that correct? Why do I picture you in southern California? ;) Now, you will tell us about your fun in Florida?  ;D

What skinny-dip, camping and hiking spots have you found yourself in? What do you do to successfully "get away" with your free range activities?

I'll think up 16 more questions while you answer.
Welcome,
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Naturistplace

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2019, 04:33:49 AM »
"From what I gather in three articles on your blog and this, you have been primarily a landed club naturist. Do I have that correct?"

Nope. I belong to two non-landed clubs. I have visited landed clubs around California, but don't go that often. My favorite landed club is Laguna del Sol, near Sacramento. It's quite a nice place, great restaurant, but I prefer "free range" nuding.

"Why do I picture you in southern California?"

That's a mystery to me. I've been in California since 1972, first in the S. F. Bay area, then near Monterey, now in the foothills of the central Sierra. While near the coast I enjoyed nude beaches around San Luis Obispo, Santa Cruz, and (a few times) near San Francisco.

"Now, you will tell us about your fun in Florida?"

From what I can learn on the Internet, the landed clubs there are thriving. But I've never been to any of those. I'm rarely in Florida, but greatly enjoyed a trip to Playalinda Beach, just north of the Kennedy Space Center - which is visible from the beach. It's clothing optional, and miles long. It's fantastic, and much nicer than any beach in California (except for the mosquitoes).

"What skinny-dip, camping and hiking spots have you found yourself in? What do you do to successfully "get away" with your free range activities?"

That's where I do most of my nuding (except for the home swimming pool). I live near the edge of the Stanislaus National Forest. "Dispersed camping" is allowed almost everywhere in the Forest. There are lots of (rough) forest roads, and a number of spots to camp where hardly anyone else ever visits. I will be putting a post on my blog soon with tips about that. I can be naked 24/7 in those places. There are also a few formal Forest Service campgrounds in lovely places. These have typical campground amenities - including decent, maintained toilets. If one picks a site carefully, it's possible to be naked there too, and nobody's likely to notice.

I'm not a young, robust hiker type (like yourself - btw I admire your blog), so I don't do much serious hiking, but when I do hike it's easy to be naked.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 04:46:09 AM by Naturistplace »

jbeegoode

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2019, 05:20:40 AM »
Is there water and are there lots of trails in your neck of the woods, ie.  Stanislaus National Forest? It would be nice to four wheel back into a place with a creek, or small river, stay a few days and do day hiking from that base.

I'm looking to travel when things get sorted out. So much of the forests in Arizona have been ravaged by fires, or the water is unpredictable, or the monsoon is now lasting much longer than it used to with the lightning and flash floods. I'd like to spend some time in places like I knew as a kid. California is on the way to Oregon and Washington.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2019, 05:36:14 AM »
HOLY POLE PINE! I just answered my own question:
It contains 78 lakes, and 811 miles (1,305.2 km) of rivers and streams. It has 1,100 miles (1,770.3 km) of non-motorized trails, and 2,859 miles (4,601.1 km) of roads, 188 miles (302.6 km) of which are paved.
The Rim Fire of 2013 was named after the Rim of the World vista point on the forest.

The Forest contains some 139,000 acres (560 km2) of old growth, which includes Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta), Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffreyi), and White Fir (Abies concolor).[2]

I'm placing this into the bucket list notes.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Naturistplace

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2019, 08:31:06 AM »
"Is there water and are there lots of trails in your neck of the woods, ie.  Stanislaus National Forest? It would be nice to four wheel back into a place with a creek, or small river, stay a few days and do day hiking from that base."

Oh, my, yes, there are lots of rivers. Major ones, and smaller ones. I camped beside the Tuolumne just a few months ago, at the confluence of middle and south forks. Was able to be naked much of the time, even though it's a "developed" site (i. e. amenities). Unfortunately, not many places to drive from there, since nearby roads were damaged two winters ago. There's a nice little campground on Jawbone Creek, which runs all summer. It's not far from the site mentioned above, except the roads between them are still not open. Other major rivers in the general area are north fork of Tuolumne, Clavey, and Stanislaus. Plus many smaller creeks. Lots of 4WD roads around, which are often OK for high-clearance SUVs. And that's all in the Stanislaus N. F. Yosemite N. P. is just south of all this, but less suitable for naking, since it's overrun with tourists. Even so, there are back roads where nude hiking is possible. Great places just south of Yosemite, too, and many rivers & streams.

There are several other National Forests to the north, all of which have plenty of rivers close to campgrounds. Another one I camped at last summer (with amenities, and sometimes naked) was on the Mokelumne. There are plenty of hiking trails too, in addition to the forest roads. The list of possibilities is quite long. Most of the best places are at higher elevations (5000+ feet), so the season is fairly short: late May to early October. A little longer if you don't mind cool temps. Most forest roads are closed from December to April. There are some good lower elevation places near Grass Valley, so somewhat longer seasons. Popular skinny dipping places in the So. Yuba River, too. I can give more details if anyone wants.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 08:36:18 AM by Naturistplace »

jbeegoode

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2019, 07:40:32 PM »
I'm looking for details and leads. I prefer to get away from people at the campgrounds. Undeveloped, water source, places to explore, a few feet of flat land for the larger glamping tent and 4x4. The satellite images looked encouraging. Lots of dramatic steep areas looked fun, but could be hard to get around. I like solitude, naked without looking over my shoulder alert all of the time.

Around here, in elevations tall enough to be lush, the mountains get cold after sundown. What's to potential to alleviate that problem and be comfortable 24/7?
Jbee
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jmf

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2019, 04:17:06 PM »
Welcome; What is the adress of your blog?
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

jbeegoode

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Naturistplace

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2019, 01:02:24 AM »
"I'm looking for details and leads. I prefer to get away from people at the campgrounds. Undeveloped, water source, places to explore, a few feet of flat land for the larger glamping tent and 4x4."

If you're planning to visit anywhere in the western Sierra from the Bass Lake area north to around Nevada City I can make specific suggestions that meet your criteria. Anything above 5000 feet won't be warm enough for comfortable nudity until late May (usually). And while it cools down to the 45-55 degree range at night, you can easily sleep naked with almost any sleeping bag. What I do in mornings and evenings is get in my car and read something. Run the heater for a short time if necessary. If you're active and hiking, you'll probably be warm enough anyhow. Chances of encountering others are almost 0 - but generally not a problem if it happens. I'll have a long post on my blog about this soon.

You might also consider spending a night or two at Laguna del Sol, near Sacramento. It's low elevation and generally warm to hot from late April on. No clothing required at all. From there, an hour or two drive lets you explore the mountain areas easily.

jbeegoode

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2019, 05:04:14 PM »
So, there are places below 4-5000 ft. with water, and secluded allowing comfortable nudity 24/7? Or are we talking just nice days and chilly nights, until the sun comes up? Back east, the nights are comfortable, as I remember. There must be something like that out west somewhere.

We've been adjusting to chilly nights, bundled up until the sun comes out in the mountains here and I'm sure that we could accommodate that, but do you know of places in the west that are warm in the evening with solitude and precious water?
Jbee
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Naturistplace

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Re: Naturist blogger
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2019, 04:48:39 AM »
Most of my naked camping experience has been at higher elevations, in the Sierra. So, kind of cool at night.

Lower elevations (< 1000 ft) are generally warmish at night (60s), and hot in the daytime during summer, except near the coast. Springtime in desert areas like Anza Borrego, or Death Valley might fit your needs, except for little water. Coastal areas are likely to be 60ish, 70ish during days. One possibility is somewhat inland near the Arroyo Seco River (which isn't actually dry). There's a FS campground where the river turns East, but you can hike from there into remote areas that are seldom visited. There's river access further South of that, and I know people who actually hike (naked, surely) in the river to the northern area. There are also seldom visited places probably suitable for camping near the river access there.

I would have explored more in that area, except I moved to the Sierra. I'm just guessing about these places I haven't actually been, but I'd say Arroyo Seco is a good possibility. The road that runs along the river is called Indians Road, and it's definitely 4WD.

California is a very big place. I'm sure there are plenty of back country areas, from San Luis Obispo north, especially 10 or 20 miles inland from the coast where things are warmer and water may be found.