Author Topic: A naturist tour of New Zealand  (Read 164 times)

John P

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A naturist tour of New Zealand
« on: March 14, 2019, 10:00:38 PM »
I have 1400 pictures from the NZ trip, and even after sifting them down, it's hard to make a selection. So I'm going to follow my past pattern of making up a table of thumbnails with enough comments that hopefully, it's clear what's happening. The crew here were Dan, Milt and myself from the USA, and Rainer from Germany. We met him on the Naked European Walking Tour in 2017. Milt set up the whole trip, renting houses in various places via AirBNB, and planning our destinations from the guidebook NZ Frenzy by Scott Cook.

Pictures are copyright me, except the one by Rainer. No stealing please.
                  
   

My first sight of my companions together, on a sidewalk in Auckland.



Rainer had a birthday coming up, and Milton brought him a Vecro wrap, but sadly it didn't fit.

Ah well. Off to South Island.

And let's rent a car and go shopping!

We're at Te Anau, on a lake of the same name.

At the Visitor Center for Fiordland National Park, we bought maps and demanded lots of attention.

A look at the lake, but no swim.

Our first hike!

But this is a little disturbing.

We've only gone a few yards when we see a South Island Robin, the cause of the poisoning campaign.

Next Rainer hurt his foot. Then we arrived at the “walkwire” bridge.

Dan knows no fear!

Milt and I went across, but Rainer elected to stay back.





This is Rainer's picture of me on the way back.

Since we'd split the party, we didn't go far, just enough for a few pictures.





That was easy!

Roadside scenery, and lake Te Anau.





Next day, dubious weather.



We started up the Routeburn Track, one of the famous “Great Walks”.

Pause to fix up Rainer's foot.



Our destination was Key Summit, where we hoped to get a view, and it clearly wasn't going to happen.

We therefore bailed on that route, and shifted over to the path up to Lake Marian instead.







It goes past continuous rapids in the stream.



Someone had to get his clothes off.

It's pretty much a rain forest, and it was pretty much raining in the forest.

Here's the lake.

How cold is it? (As if Dan cares.)

But so many tourists! However, we edged around the rocks on the headland seen in the middle of the picture.

So, we got a swim.













Then, back down the trail.

Another day, and we're on the water taxi across the end of Lake Manapouri.

We're doing this early, to try and get to the trail up Precipice Peak before the crowds arrive.

Different good stuff!

Now Rainer's hurt his other foot.

A gnome.

A different part of a gnome.







Here we are at the top.







Our delays on the trail meant that we only got to enjoy the peak alone for a short while.



The way down led through a lovely forest with wind blowing up the hill and through the trees.





Back to the boat.

That afternoon, there was time for a walk to a different place on Manapouri, after crossing the Waiau River.

This river was filmed as the Anduin in Lord of the Rings.

The lake looked nice, but the bottom was sticky mud.

Good for a rest, though.


                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
         
         
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 11:19:02 PM by John P »

nuduke

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2019, 12:04:13 AM »

Gad, what fun! 
What were the typical temperatures?
Did you walk continuously or was it back to the same residential venue every evening?  Or several?


What incredibly beautiful forests and landscapes.  The forest trails look particularly wonderful (I like forest!)
Thank you so much for sharing this travelogue, John P and for the effort of compiling the photos into the post.


It's a mighty big journey. How long does it take to fly from USA to NZ?  Did you see other parts of the country too?  Nude or clothed?

John

John P

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2019, 05:05:19 AM »
Fun, it was.

In the western coastal part of South Island, you get the wind off the ocean, and it rains most days. Temperatures around 70F/21C, or somewhat less right by the sea. But inland it was consistently comfortable, say 77F/25C.

We rented houses via AirBNB and did single-day hikes or other adventures from there. Apart from initial and final nights at a hotel in Auckland, we stayed in 3 houses in the South Island and 3 in the North Island, plus stays at a commercial naturist resort and a cooperative one, both in North Island.

It was a 4-1/2 hour flight from Boston to Houston, then a 2 hour layover, then Houston to Auckland is listed as just over 15 hours, so it was a pretty hard day (but Rainer traveled further from Germany). That part of the trip was not fun, but you just have to do it. Since you cross the Date Line at about midnight, a day passes by that you never even know about.

I'll be posting more episodes, so just wait a while and you'll see some more places.

I use a spreadsheet to list the pictures, and I upload them to Imgur about 20 at a time, so really the amount of time to put the postings together isn't all that great. There's always something out of order though!

John P

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2019, 04:00:46 PM »
What you have to do in the South Island is take a boat trip on Milford Sound. It's known for its bad weather and its hordes of carnivorous flies, but we picked a dry day, and the flies weren't bad at all.
                              
   

You get to Milford Sound via a tunnel with single-lane traffic, controlled by lights. There's time to stroll around and take pictures.

Water level view showing the cruise boat dock.

The Sound is said to have the world's highest sea cliffs.

We booked a trip for a day when no rain was forecast!



There are numerous waterfalls.





On account of the weather, they offer raincoats.

Here you can see (but mustn't feed) the famous kea parrots.

Nevertheless, they are looking for handouts.

Now we did our trip to Key Summit!



Dan is pointing to the view of Marian Lake, which we swam in the other day.





Somehow when I do this it just looks silly.







On the way back down.



Late in the day, there weren't many people coming up, so some nudity was possible.

It was a long day.

Our house in Te Anau, just as we left.

As we drove past  Lake Wakatipu, a swim opportunity presented itself.





View of the Southern Alps from our swim stop.

Farther up the lake, we had to detour to investigate a waterfall.





It was too difficult to reach the fall itself, but there was a nice (very cold!) pool below it.



Walking back to the car.

View from our house in Glenorchy.



Dan and I went out to the lake that evening, but he astonished me by not swimming.

Next day, off to the old gold mine.

It was called the Invincible Mine, and it was up on the hillside above the Rees Valley.

These machines are called Berdans, after their American inventor, Hiram Berdan.

They were used to pulverize gold-bearing rock.



 Lake Wakatipu on a misty morning, the day we left.

This was the shortest section of railroad in New Zealand, from the end of the pier to the freight shed.

South of Queenstown, we passed Kawarau Bridge, where they do bungee jumping.

They say it's 43 meters down.

A boat retrieves the happy jumpers. On request, they'll set the cord length so that you get a quick dip in the river.

A young Chinese couple prepare for a joint descent.



The bathrooms had appropriate signs.





Milt plans our next day's travels.

At our next stop, we were near another gold mine complex, with the remains of miners' houses.

When he heard that the village was called “Welshtown”, Dan had to go there (being of Welsh ancestry).







A little display of artifacts from the ruins.



At shaft number 2, a grating keeps visitors from plunging to their deaths (no bungee cord here).
                  
         

Bob Knows

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2019, 02:48:19 PM »
Beautiful pictures of a beautiful experience. 
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

jbeegoode

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2019, 10:24:23 PM »
Those bridges gotta suck. They remind me of back country rope bridges in Bolivia, when I did an Inca trail hike. The last was the worst, but couldn't hike back 70 miles up hill. The ropes were rusty steel cable. The planks were cut locally, but old and many would be missing. The last bridge crossed a raging current for much more than a hundred feet. It would swing. I had a top heavy 40lb. plus backpack to destabilize me. Out in the middle the planks were missing for six or more feet and there was one long one, just resting there to get across that. One foot in front of the other. If it slipped, I'd have to just hang on. It flexed with my weight. I did that, but somehow I have developed an irrational fear of heights in my older years. Go figure.

Did this one tend to swing? Barefoot better, or not?

Why are those really cool waterfalls really cold, anyway?
Jbee

 
Barefoot all over, all over.

jmf

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2019, 08:39:27 AM »
Thanks for all these pictures that remind me of places I visited a few thirty years ago (already!)
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

John P

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2019, 04:05:44 PM »
JBG, there's a lot of difference between a poverty-stricken country and a prosperous one. In New Zealand the bridges might be scary at first, but there really is a safe way to cross them. I don't think your Bridge of San Luis Rey there was safe for anyone, ever! And actually, Mistake Creek was the only walkwire we encountered. The others were all regular suspension bridges which were kept in good condition.

This episode takes us up to the Rob Roy Glacier and then away from South Island.

The warnings about poison, and the traps containing it, are aimed at eliminating alien predators, chiefly the European stoat (a small weasel) which was released to try to reduce the number of rabbits (originally released accidentally) which were eating the grass that farmers wanted their sheep to have. Once they were established, the stoats wiped out most of the native birds, which had lost the habit of nesting in trees because until Europeans arrived, there were no land animals to make it dangerous to nest on the ground.


Today we're off to the Matukituki Valley! Note that waterfall way ahead, which looks like a little white line below the glacier.

Here's one of those traps they put the poison in.

Since the nasty predators eat eggs, an egg is the bait.

A final look at the map.

Always something to worry about.

The way leads across a suspension bridge.



Up the trail we go—but too many people for nudity.



Getting closer!





Under the glacier is a popular lunch spot.

A rough and rugged hiker.





Note the human figure silhouetted against the waterfall (not one of our group).

Like fiddling while Rome burns, lunch while the glacier melts.

Here the wind is blowing the waterfall upward.

100 years ago, the glacier came to the bottom of these cliffs.

All that ice makes it a little chilly, so even naturists put more clothes on.



No nudity yet today! But what about this “Wishbone Falls” place?



Out of the way sheep, here come some naturists.

Yes, looks like our kind of place.







No rockfalls right now, please.





Back to the road.

Who'll come out of the mist and up the valley—a band of adventurers, or the iron-shod army of the Dark Lord?

Evening, and a view from our house.

Making dinner, but note that we don't get far from our computers.

Next day, off to visit another gold mine!



We're going in there, right?

Sure we are.





This is a restored ore-crushing battery, using the original iron parts.



When it was in use, there would have been a shed over it.

I think this is volcanic tuff.

A view over the valley.

Now we're on a walk with the full group.







Now this is how to nake!



Just a butterfly.

This is our house, but now it's time to leave South Island.

Another view, middle of the day this time.

Returning the car—no extra charge for the dust.

At Queenstown where we flew from, there aren't any gangways, so you go out on the tarmac and up some stairs.
         

jbeegoode

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2019, 09:41:56 PM »
John P wrote: "JBG, there's a lot of difference between a poverty-stricken country and a prosperous one. In New Zealand the bridges might be scary at first, but there really is a safe way to cross them. I don't think your Bridge of San Luis Rey there was safe for anyone, ever!"

San Luis Rey? The bridge that I was referring to is at the base of the mountain near the town of Corroico, Bolivia. I'm not sure the name of the river. I just attempted to look it up. It may be Rio Corroico. We were of the first dozen gringos to do the trail back in, I think, the Fall of 1974. Now, there are little stores and camping areas for tourists. Still, there was mention of dangley rope bridges with missing planks to this day on the internet. It now has a name, the "Choro Trek". Back then, even the museum in La Paz didn't know about it. There looks to be lots of new development and new roads, but this trail is extremely remote after 45 years.

So, I now always thing Lord of the Rings these days when I think New Zealand. No room for trolls and goblins under skimpy bridges. And the Dwarves seem to be long gone, or got techy, judging the equipment.
Jbee



Barefoot all over, all over.

John P

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2019, 11:02:25 PM »
You were quite an adventurer in your young days! But it's a book, JBG. I was required to read it in high school.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bridge_of_San_Luis_Rey

You can do a Lord of the Rings pilgrimage in New Zealand, going from one location to another. But the movie was made with extensive use of digital effects, so places aren't always easy to recognize. We didn't do any of that, though there is one spot that'll come up where our path crossed with Frodo's. Also we got out onto the lava fields of Mordor, but only had glimpses of Mount Doom. Hobbiton (re-created) wasn't on the itinerary.


BlueTrain

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2019, 12:04:15 PM »
On the subject of movie locations, I have only purposely visited one, which was Fawnskin, on Big Bear Lake in California. I immediately noticed a utility pole that wasn't in the movie but when I watched the scene again, sure enough, it was actually there. The movie was made in the late 1950s and the location as seen in the movie was unchanged.

In a similar vein, I visited a nudist club in Maryland (which may actually be just over the state line in Pennsylvania) several years back. I recalled having seen photos of the club in an old nudist magazine. Although I didn't remember enough about the photo layout to make comparisons, not that I was thinking about it at the time, in the photos some people were shooting rifles (M1 carbines, to be exact).

nuduke

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Re: A naturist tour of New Zealand
« Reply #11 on: Today at 12:12:25 AM »

Wow, JohnP
A plethora of pics. Wonderful.  We don't post our adventures so much these days.  It's great to experience albeit vicariously your frolickings in the antipodes! :)
It must have been such a spiritual tonic to be amongst all that wild and clement country and free to roam naked. 


Were there, in fact, more encounters with textiles and sections you had to cover up than the photos would suggest?


You certainly seem to have got the knack of 'productionising' your photo uploading!  It's an achievement if I get one to post cleanly!


John