Author Topic: Slavin Gulch, Part II  (Read 239 times)

jbeegoode

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Slavin Gulch, Part II
« on: March 22, 2019, 04:05:31 AM »
 Hiking up Slavin Gulch Trail there are many surprises. Then, a short trips to Tombstone and some sarsaparilla.

https://thefreerangenaturist.org/2019/03/22/slavin-gulch-part-ii/

Jbee
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nuduke

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2019, 12:22:06 AM »

Az is something of a paradise if you keep clear of Phoenix!  Is there no end to the amazing places you find!?
Typically what time of day would you leave home to get to a trail and how long would you spend walking before you return to the truck?
So many of those cliffside and hoodoo formations seemed to be but lightly glued together.  Did you see any falling rocks?
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2019, 06:42:14 AM »
We always leave later than planned. :D

The time will vary depending on the drive time and planned duration. Nothing is typical.

 It also varies because of weather temps. The high and low temps in Arizona tend to vary give or take 30F or 40F degrees on a given day. We arrive when it is still cool, or when it warms up, typically. Depending on the drive and how long we'll be out, we may get to the trailhead the night before, or make a hike a camping trip.

We walk till it is over. Sometimes when half the water is gone. We take a snack and spend three to five hours out there typically on a day hike.

If I catch your drift, most of these places are within two hours of central Tucson, or my northwest side retreat. We stay the night accordingly to save driving time. Examples, Mt. Lemon trails an hour, Redington 35 minutes, Huachuca Mts. two hours give or take. The hotsprings are two and a half. North of PHX is three hours and then what it takes to get there from northern PHX suburbs. The White Mountains, five hours to Honda and more from that intersection. We've got so much diversity within two hours! I've still got a bucket list of hikes that we haven't done within sight (on top of one of these mountains).

There are surprisingly few falling rocks. Rocks usually give out during heavy rains. It is some outlandish glue. This place had many boulders in the stream bed, but most appeared to have been from construction of the old road to the mine. I can't walk in that place without daydreaming about capturing one of those ancient hoodoo formations on camera the moment that they give it up, but it ain't happening. :( ;D

In this next month the website will tell a story that ends at a taller peak. I just sat and identified the many hikes that we have taken from that sight of 360 degree vista. We have liberated most of Southern Arizona, but here is still much work to do. The trails and secrets still to uncover seem endless. So far, we have only sampled vast areas.

Thanks for asking, 
Jbee

« Last Edit: March 27, 2019, 07:07:32 AM by jbeegoode »
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nuduke

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2019, 06:25:15 PM »

You're welcome!  I was interested.  I was imagining you often had a pretty punishing schedule on a hike day - off at dawn, hiking early and back to the car at sunset and then a couple to three hours drive back.  But it seems as though you sensibly meter your total days travelling hours and effort in hiking to minimise the negative side of the challenge and maximise the enjoyment of the walk.  How nice!
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2019, 07:37:12 PM »
Every so often, we'll get up early to get to water after rains, or other opportunities. We always try to settle down and make camp around 4pm. It somehow works out for the best to get the chores done, dinner and enjoy ourselves. Sometimes, with a 30 degree temperature change during a day, we focus on the best time. Naked as the chill of evening comes is a negative, or waiting for the day to warm enough is a positive. I plan around make for a pleasant comfortable day.

Enjoyment is the main thrust. In the moment, with a sense of synchronicity. We have been marching seldom, but are doing that more and more. Our marching is for exercise, stamina for longer explorations and feeling less wear and tear at the end. At least during some part of the hike, we agree to do a stretch like that.

I have a tendency to walk faster more often. DF lags back to take photos and imbibe, and enjoy her personal solitude and pace. If I get ahead, I'll sit quietly in solitude and wait the few moments. Then, I notice her ahead of me towards the end, like a horse heading back to the stall. We make a point to not get separated. There are too often, too many spots to get lost, or something so fun as to be compelling to share.

We see so many people trudging through with blinders. We'll stand right on the side of the trail naked and they just walk on by oblivious. Many talk the whole time, scare wildlife away and are not there on the trail but where and when their conversation is. Some are into the camaraderie more, it seems. When we hike we don't generally talk, except about what we are doing or experiencing. The rest of the world drifts off, or comes to mind in the evening. I think that naked brings much of this out. Watching for scratchy bushes, feeling with all of the senses the immediate surroundings, or being more a part off, is a naturist thing. Unclear trails and listening for other hikers are another attention getter. 

AND then, we very often plan to get out on the trail early and start later than intended...It's all perfect.
Jbee
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 09:52:35 PM by jbeegoode »
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BlueTrain

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2019, 09:47:51 PM »
I found that when I was hiking nude, it seemed like my senses were elevated, but only in the sense that I was trying to be more aware of other people I might run into. I'm not sure I was, though.

I just came back from a walk in the local woods, about two miles round trip. Part of the walk is on a paved trail and I certainly walk faster then. But on the muddy trails (when they have been lately), I go slower, partly to study the surroundings and partly because the footing is more difficult. The insects are out now, too, by the way. I was also describing on another forum how it seems like I am less likely to fall down when I'm on a long walk in the woods or on sidewalks around the neighborhood. That is, compared with inside the house. Outside, once I'm in my stride, I'm all warmed up and limber and I use a hiking stick, too. Inside, I get up from sitting and I'm stiff and a little unsteady (and without a hiking stick). Dick Van Dyke says you have to keep moving.

MartinM

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2019, 09:54:01 AM »
You clearly have the right idea, not having targets other than enjoying yourselves. Great to have the warm weather, the trails and someone to share it with. I would be getting out today for a walk, but have other plans, so hopefully next weekend. I think my friend would probably up for your kind of hiking with me, except she won’t uncover due to sensitivity to the sun. We keep trying to organise a trip somwhere suitable for hiking gently in nature - oh, but she doesn’t like camping......
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BlueTrain

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2019, 12:03:57 PM »
I wasn't hiking--or walking--nude yesterday, understand. I live in a suburban neighborhood which, the way it is laid out, is hilly but with a lot of wooded land in between the different sections. So there is a lot of space for the wildlife left over. Anyway, it's too close to houses to be nude and there are other people out walking around, too, especially on weekends. For nude hiking, I have to go close to a hundred miles from home. That's quite a distance but it's okay for a day trip. The leaves aren't out yet and it's a little early still.

I probably have targets, though, in my outings, other than just getting out of the house. I don't call myself a bird watcher but all the wildlife is of interest to me. I always see a lot of deer tracks but only see deer now and then. We (my wife and I) have seen foxes relative frequently lately, which is something. Beaver come and go in the creeks but they are more troublesome than any other wildlife the way dam up the creek and cut down trees and shrubs. But they don't come into the yard and eat the flowers like the deer will. My wife sprinkles pepper on the plants, which seems to help. In theory, I should be walking for the exercise and the physical benefit but that's incidental.

My wife actually walks more than I do (she's younger, after all), generally three or four miles a day. But she doesn't walk in the woods, instead, making her rounds on the local sidewalks. I do that, too, when I get tired of squishing through the mud in the places I go. We've had a wet year. I guess I'm out for the exercise when I do that.  As for exposure to the sun, the places I go for nude hiking are all shady or will be once the leaves are out. My wife swims in the summer, too, and even though she is, or was, a redhead (same as me), she will get a respectable tan by the end of summer. But I'm the one who had skin cancer treatments, which were not serious. I like to tell the doctors that no one in my family ever had cancer but they're all dead anyway, just the same.

After all that, I'm thinking it's time for a long outing in the hills.

jbeegoode

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2019, 10:00:49 PM »
You clearly have the right idea, not having targets other than enjoying yourselves. Great to have the warm weather, the trails and someone to share it with. I would be getting out today for a walk, but have other plans, so hopefully next weekend. I think my friend would probably up for your kind of hiking with me, except she won’t uncover due to sensitivity to the sun. We keep trying to organise a trip somwhere suitable for hiking gently in nature - oh, but she doesn’t like camping......
Has she seen any of our website? It is hoped that it will inspire people. Even the sun sensitive can minimize exposure by sitting in the shade, only dropping coverings in smaller increments of time, or staying partially dressed to protect the more vulnerable areas, like shoulders and noses.

According to the greatest philosopher in the Universe, Yoda, "There is no try. There is only do." ::)

What places have you been considering for hiking? Spring has sprung!
Jbee
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nuduke

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2019, 09:54:59 PM »


I found that when I was hiking nude, it seemed like my senses were elevated, but only in the sense that I was trying to be more aware of other people I might run into.
[/l]

We had a lot of discussion about this back in the day (some years BT...before Blue Train :) ).  There is a sort of animal 6th sense that turns on when you are out naked.  It's to do with 2 things I think.  Principally the qui vive - the impulse to be vigilant and ensure you are alone and not seen and listening and looking for small signs of someone near or approaching.  Secondly there's (I find) a sort of heightened and slightly euphoric awareness of yourself in the natural surroundings that you are walking naked in.  You are more one with nature (although we homo sapiens urbanensis , I believe, can never really be fully one with nature) and somehow hearing and feeling nature around you (I walk mostly in woodlands which makes this all the more real).  I sometimes feel like a woodland animal or a spirit amongst many spirits in the forest.
Dick van Dyke's advice is VERY true!  Exercise is vital as you get older.  There are only three or four things that protect you against old age and geriatric decline:  Exercise, Healthy diet, Keeping your brain active, Socialisiation with others.
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2019, 10:07:02 PM »
Nuduke wrote, "I sometimes feel like a woodland animal or a spirit amongst many spirits in the forest."

When you are naked in the forest, you are, you have become, a woodland animal or a spirit amongst many spirits in the forest.
Just not a very professional one. ::)

I'm surprised that there hasn't been more comment about our first encounter with a drone in the wild. Have we talked it out?
Jbee
« Last Edit: April 03, 2019, 10:13:11 PM by jbeegoode »
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BlueTrain

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2019, 10:24:21 PM »
You left out getting outside. But otherwise, that probably covers it pretty well. Diets vary so much, though, that it's difficult to pin down exactly what a healthy diet really is. Just eat what your mother said to eat, lay off the alcohol and tobacco and don't worry about the details. Don't eat too much, either.

Although I did say that being naked outside (out on the trail, that is) gives a heightened sense of being, to put it another way, it's easy enough to lose that sense. That is, after a few hours of gliding along the trail, totally naked except for something on your feet and whatever you're presumably carrying, you start to feel like that's the only way to hike--or walk--and not having met anyone in the last five or ten miles, you lose the edge. It's still wonderful to be nude but you quit worrying about running into someone, or at least not so much. But animals aren't as aware of things as you might think.

We feed the birds on our deck and that means we mostly feed the squirrels. I was sitting in the sun a day or two ago when a squirrel walked past me just a few feet away, totally oblivious to my presence. Once I moved, though, he runs like a rabbit. Even more interesting is how twice, I have had foxes come very close to me as I stood there watching. The only trick is to see them first. One time, two foxes were trotting towards me as I stood still, until one noticed me about fifteen feet away. Another time, one came down off a hillside and perched on a rock to keep a watch--and facing the other way. Of course, more often they see me first and take off.

The socialization of this forum is not real, of course, but it sure keeps my brain active. And spell-check, too, for that matter.

We are definitely part of nature, too. An animal in some respect, and in the sense that it means life, a spirit, too. And I am also reminded that we will return to become part of the earth, too.

nuduke

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2019, 10:27:53 PM »

Quote
I'm surprised that there hasn't been more comment about our first encounter with a drone in the wild. Have we talked it out?Jbee
I don't recall that, Jbee.
Was it in an FRN Blog?  If so, which?
John
« Last Edit: April 03, 2019, 10:29:43 PM by nuduke »

jbeegoode

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Re: Slavin Gulch, Part II
« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2019, 10:37:40 PM »
This one. Slavin Gulch II. We were followed by a drone. There is a discussion of drones somewhere here on this site also. Just not any mention of this encounter. We were buzzed.
Jbee                         
« Last Edit: April 03, 2019, 10:39:23 PM by jbeegoode »
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