Author Topic: newTumbl  (Read 2885 times)

BlueTrain

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #30 on: July 11, 2019, 09:24:35 PM »
"That thing about being defined as your work can be down right sick. A doctor gets a projection of all d sorts of righteousness, even though he may be an asshole of a person, selfish, a good doctor of whatever, but socially stagnant or socially under developed."

Frankly, that's rather harsh. And referring to someone as "small-minded" isn't exactly a kind thing to say, either. I understand, I think, what you're trying to say but you're also trying to claim the moral high ground. I'm probably the sort of socially stagnant or socially under-developed person to whom you're referring. But that's okay. I gave up trying to be a social climber years ago.

I still prefer the term nudist. To say naturist is evasive, like it's a euphemism. Originally, naturist meant more than just nudist. But call yourself whatever you want and I am not offended.

jbeegoode

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #31 on: July 12, 2019, 03:03:53 AM »
"Claiming moral high ground"? I suspect a misunderstanding is happening here. Maybe if you try reading it again?

Upon further contemplation of "small minded," I believe that it is a very apt term to use, not harsh, just addressing a fact. Another way to put it is being judgemental, and prejudiced. You can't tell a book by it's cover. If you project crap on someone because they look like they don't fit your self-righteous concept of a perfect world, you are being ignorant, harsh and contemptuous, which is definitive of a small mind.

Nobody here is less a man because he prefers to blow off clothing. None here are less than because of the work that they do. Laborers are not less than, those educated are not more than, yet there are those that believe such and demean others according to that ignorance.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Peter S

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #32 on: July 12, 2019, 07:42:58 AM »
I think labels are societyís shorthand way of getting through the day without over complicating transient relationships. Certainly they can be skewed or soured by the definitions that individuals attach to those labels (labourers are down, academics are up, or vice versa) but isnít that the way with everything, part of the human condition. I know that my bus driver is more than ďjustĒ a bus driver, but for those few moments of our brief encounter I donít need - or want - the rest of his life to intrude on mine, any more than he wants to know me as anything more than ďa return to the high streetĒ ticket buyer, soon forgotten.

The unfortunate effect of the labels comes when people canít see beyond them at times when perhaps they should. But the counter-effect also comes across, like a recent headline marvelling that a guy who used to be a homeless rough sleeper is now an opera star; butwhy shouldnít rough sleepers be able to sing? Iím sure we can all add to a long list of such misconceptions bred from the labelling shorthand.
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BlueTrain

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #33 on: July 12, 2019, 11:22:16 AM »
I'm sure that homeless should be considered a temporary status, although it sure enough carries an overtone beyond that, just like college student. But not everyone thinks in terms of labels and if you don't think of others in terms of a label, then you're unlikely to think of yourself that way either.

Who here thinks of themselves as a nudist--or naturist, to use the politically correct term? Does it matter? Does it have any real meaning? Or does anyone prefer not to think of themselves that way? In other words, do people dislike the term because it has picked up negative connotations somewhere along the way? Like there is a suggestion of hedonism, exhibitionist and so on.

I would suggest that labels get used the most when the degree of familiarity is the least, although that certainly wasn't true in an example I usually give. Anyway, you probably don't think of your friends in terms of labels, even if you might still use them. But
'friend' might be a label, too.

nuduke

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #34 on: July 12, 2019, 05:02:59 PM »

Quote from: Peter S
I prefer not to accept the label Ďnaturistí or Ďnudistí because I feel neither define me - I am someone who prefers being naked over wearing clothes, end of.
What a great way of thinking about the naked life, Peter.  I'll gladly be unlabelled like that...or is it labelled like that :)
I think all the labels and categories we attach to eacholther are often more helpful than deleterious.  How many times does our work or career label us usefully?  Lots in my experience.  When I meet new people they always ask what I do for a living because it reveals so much about the likely background of the person.  When I tell them I'm retired they always ask what I did before I retired.  If the person seems particularly boring I might respond "Plan my retirement!"
John

eyesup

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #35 on: July 12, 2019, 07:11:44 PM »
Thereís nothing wrong with operating from a 1st impression even if itís wrong or off a little bit. If I allow that I am only seeing a 1st impression, I can certainly modify that impression. Pigeonholing is definitely alike to judging. No disagreement there.

But conversation is the best way to make adjustments even if you donít think or believe the same. Itís also more accurate. Although once someone opens their mouth thereís no telling what you will learn. Sometimes it becomes a TMI event.

Jbee, I am ok with being shunned occasionally. For me, it usually means those that engage in that kind of behavior have decided to NOT associate with me, and thatís ok too. Silver linings and all that.

I will say that the less attention I see that people are paying to their clothing the better I tend to think of them. Is that a judgement?

Duane

eyesup

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #36 on: July 12, 2019, 07:27:29 PM »
People can refer to me however they please.
They have as much right to be wrong as they have to speak.
I am not obligated to agree or to respond.

I agree with that proposition, Peter S. We live in a culture over saturated with information and pedantic heads pushing small agendas. It can be argued that spending time on a porch getting to know a passerby is a old custom that is worth reviving. But our attention span has atrophied.

So we smile and choose to accept an inaccurate assumption, not because we believe it, but because we donít have the time or energy to so otherwise.

Duane

BlueTrain

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #37 on: July 13, 2019, 07:00:39 PM »
There is a joke that says we start out worrying about what people think about us.
Then we get to the point where we don't care what people think about us.
Finally we realize that nobody was ever thinking of us in the first place.

I'm not so sure that we can tell how much people worry about their clothing just by looking at them. We might be guilty of reading things into other people that aren't there. So people wear whatever happens to be in style at the moment. But if someone went out of their way to wear something else--to avoid being seen as caring about clothes--who's worried more about their clothes then?

One of my uncles worked for the railroad (so did two other uncles and a few cousins). His entire wardrobe consisted of about three sets of matching work clothes that probably came from Wards. Long pants, long sleeves, same thing year-round. He had one suit for the rare occasions calling for a suit, such as funerals. One relatively thin jacket for cold weather. Everything would have fit in a closet one foot wide. He wore overalls at work over that (he was a welder). Did he ever think about clothes? Doubtful but my aunt said that he wouldn't wear a pair of overalls on which bleach had been spilled.

nuduke

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #38 on: July 20, 2019, 02:03:53 PM »
Quote
There is a joke that says we start out worrying about what people think about us.
Then we get to the point where we don't care what people think about us.
Finally we realize that nobody was ever thinking of us in the first place.
I'm somewhere along the line past 2 and almost at 3.  I wish my wife would realise nobody really cares what I wear or don't wear so she should stop bothering too! That'll be the day!! :D
John

BlueTrain

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #39 on: July 20, 2019, 05:42:56 PM »
I think we might be as much saturated with misinformation as we are with information. And don't believe your own propaganda.

Of course there are people who care about what you wear and other little details about your life, real or assumed. They may or may not know you. You can know that this is true because you notice other people and make little and unimportant judgements about them. We aren't supposed to do things like that but it seems to be human nature. I suspect that some animals do the same thing, especially dogs. But none of this is something to worry about, except for the dogs.

Here's another thought:
There was an English country gentleman with some status in the local community. But he was not a well-dressed man, contrary to what was or is expected of an English country gentleman. When he was around where he was known, he would say, "It doesn't matter what I wear; everyone knows me." But when he was somewhere else, he would say, "It doesn't matter what I wear; nobody knows me."

Does it ever matter what others think of us?

Peter S

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Re: newTumbl
« Reply #40 on: July 21, 2019, 05:10:33 PM »
It can certainly matter in the work context - if you donít wear the right ďuniformĒ for your role people wonít trust you enough to employ you. Iíve often heard people say it shouldnít matter what you wear, itís how well you do the job. But people go a lot on first impressions, and if you appear at their door looking like something else they wonít give you the job. Would you rate a plumber who arrived wearing a three-piece suit over one in overalls?

But if things like employment and getting paid donít hang off othersí opinions then on the whole Iíd go along with your English gentlemanís approach.
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