Author Topic: Forest bathing  (Read 3605 times)

nuduke

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2019, 12:17:22 AM »

Duane, it's a long time since you posted a picture of your hiking country and I am reminded how much of a beautiful and forbidding desert you inhabit.  You must also be incredibly confident to walk the highways with no apparent cover to either side.  Great stuff!
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2019, 09:21:03 AM »
HA, haven't been to the middle of Nevada, huh?

Best place I know to travel on a two land highway at 100 mph naked, for hours.

Coyotes and calves don't complain.

Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2019, 01:35:50 AM »
John, with all the high priority events of the last couple years I haven’t been out that much. And when I did I was not taking pictures, just cuttin’ out for some QUIET.

I’ll get back in the swing soon.

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2019, 01:36:43 AM »
From: Re: Forest bathing
Quote from: Jbee
Coyotes and calves don't complain.
Years ago on a road trip around Nevada, we came south down the ET Highway from Hwy 6. This was in ninety nine or naught naught. No cell service back then and so close to Area 51 that there were no services of any kind. We were in open range territory.

We passed a large herd of cattle, some near the hwy, with one standing smack in the middle and just stared us down as I slowly drove around it. Not only do they not complain, “They don’t care!”. :D I loved it. I was drivin’ through his front room!

Duane

BlueTrain

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2019, 12:12:45 PM »
Did you ever notice that when you become aware of something, you start noticing it everywhere? Or so it seems.

In the current issue of Smithsonian Associates magazine, which is a catalogue of upcoming events to be presented by the museum, there is listed "An Immersion in Nature: Japanese "Forest Bathing"--Urban Style." It is a hosted and guided walk in one of the museum's gardens (one that I know nothing about). An important point, maybe, is that it is guided by a certified nature and forest-therapy guide. What more could you ask for? I'm surprised that something that hasn't been around that long has evolved into something with certified guides, instructors and whatnot, just like hang-gliding. It's like they have a union now, although they would undoubtedly call it a guild.

It really only sounds mildly interesting to me, not that we'll go to any of them, even though most of them are only 20 miles away. But there is a session on American Whiskey (with tasting), one on "Portable Pies" (with tasting), Wine 101 (with tasting), Tiki Time! (with tasting) and "The Table at Downton Abbey" (with refreshments). Unfortunately, that one's sold out. You might call all of this culture (with tasting).

Although I love going to the woods and do so every day or so (at least when I don't fall in the creek), I don't find it quite like the usual descriptions of what could only be a park-like setting--even though my trips are typically in parks. Where I go, there are insects a-plenty, mud, tall weeds and briars and in places, unpleasant smells. But it's all familiar and I feel at home. I've seen more wildlife near the house than I have anywhere and I haven't seen much mention of wildlife in comments about forest bathing. Maybe those who talk about it are romanticizing the experience. In fact, I don't even call it a forest; just 'the woods.' It's good enough for the deer.

Bob Knows

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2019, 07:49:19 PM »
An important point, maybe, is that it is guided by a certified nature and forest-therapy guide.

The concept of certified guides for "nature" in the woods seems antithetical to me.  Maybe I'm spoiled by living in the woods.  Maybe city people need a guide, but how is that nature.

Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
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BlueTrain

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2019, 09:21:37 PM »
My point was that in any industry, field of employment or recreational activity, there comes a time when you have to be licensed or certified or something like that. It's the increasingly professionalization of everything. It goes back a long ways, more in some places than others. There must be some threshold beyond which someone says you need a license or professional certificate.

jbeegoode

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2019, 02:57:22 AM »
An important point, maybe, is that it is guided by a certified nature and forest-therapy guide.

The concept of certified guides for "nature" in the woods seems antithetical to me.  Maybe I'm spoiled by living in the woods.  Maybe city people need a guide, but how is that nature.


I think that it is like the boy scouts. Not everybody had a dad, or uncle, or was a boy scout.

Incidentally, I get to take my granddaughter (age 10) camping in the forest this month. She has no clue, so much to teach and teaching her how to learn by herself.

Nope, we have to sacrifice our nudity for her parents sensibilities, but, it's a start for her sense of nature in this world.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2019, 01:30:39 PM »
Nature is all around us. Birds live in the city, not to mention deer, beaver, foxes, raccoons and other odd beasts. Perhaps they know no better or, more likely, no choice. For most of them, it may even be safer, although the deer have a lot to learn about crossing the street. There are squirrels in abundance and even a few rabbits but it isn't safe for them anywhere.

What do the Scouts and Camp Fire Girls do on the Great Plains where there is no forest, only patches of trees here and there alongside the creeks and rivers? How can they learn woodcraft or bushcraft? They can only make do with what nature there is, I suppose.

It is no coincidence that the various youth movements began within the roughly fifteen or twenty year period that the different naturism movements began. There was a widespread belief among those who thought about such things that there were no new worlds to conquer or explore. There was more to it than that, a lot more, but it seems pretty obvious to me that all these movements had a lot in common. Most are still going strong today, too.

eyesup

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #24 on: August 06, 2019, 07:02:11 AM »
Have her parents ever taken her camping? Does she know anything about the outdoors?
What a treat, Jbee. To be present and participate in the learning by a child of what it means to be in the outdoors and be a part of it.

Maybe her parents will come along eventually.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2019, 07:51:53 PM »
Her dad is a quad guy, toys and beer culture. Her mom is her girl scout leader, but dislikes the camping stuff. They had two sort of campouts. They were ill prepared and chose crappy cold weather. They got a bad taste in their mouths, being so uncomfortable.

She has been indoors most of her life. She is actually kind of klutsy from it, but gymnastic classes are improving that. I took her on a nature walk through the wash behind her house and we cataloged items that she collected and learned from. She responded well, but wasn't good with the overgrown nature around her.

We are looking for mild weather, out of the heat. A lush mountain forest to walk and hike and a fire. She has enjoyed fires and made up ghost stories. We have taken her up to our hidden place on Mt. Lemmon and she enjoyed the walk. She was clumsy on an uneven trail and they put her in shoes that are better on flat surfaces.

She has been to the beach. I don't think that she particularly enjoyed our walk to Havarock in the thick desert. A user-friendly forest may help. We just wish that those nude body mandates from her parents didn't exist, for our sake. Maybe, I'll do my kilt.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2019, 10:42:12 PM »
If she didn't like where you took her walking, she'd hate the places I go walking--or hiking, if you prefer. There are sometimes insects galore, mud, sometimes smells, high temperatures and even high humidity's, overgrown trails and slick rocks. I wouldn't mind going to a user-friendly forest myself. You might ask why I even go.

Because it's there.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2019, 10:44:17 PM by BlueTrain »

jbeegoode

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2019, 06:20:06 AM »
She liked the mountain trail.

When I was just younger than she was, I lived in Falls Church. I don't remember it being quite like that. I wore just a pair of shorts and tidy whiteys all summer. Most often shoes. We had a couple of creeks with crawdads, frogs, turtles and tortoises. It was nice and shady there.

When a tad older, I lived on Ft. Eustis, near Jamestown on the James River. There were a couple of swampy spots, like you describe. The river was nice and warm, and pretty calm. The woods were fun and user-friendly. We would play war games, climb trees, dig things up. We got boy scout cigarettes. Poison ivy was a problem for some, but I wasn't allergic to it.

We used to go to the country where we could slide on a rock in the creek's swimming hole. It was out among the stone walls. We stayed in a cabin that was built in the revolutionary period.

Sounds like you are frequenting a swamp.
Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2019, 10:26:48 PM »
Quote from: Jbee
They were ill prepared and chose crappy cold weather. They got a bad taste in their mouths, being so uncomfortable.
We had this to deal with in Scouts. Some boys had been on family trips that turned south and just put, as you said, ‘a bad taste in their mouth’. Your grand daughter needs an exciting and uplifting campout. One that is a challenge for her but not too difficult. A good hike/campout needs people with the right experiences to make sure that even if something bad happens, you can still have a good outing.

My son and I went on the 1st backpacking trip either of us had ever been on while we were in Scouts. We hiked the west rim trail at Zion. Because we had experienced backpackers in the troup and on the hike, 7 boys and 4 adults were able to have a great time hiking and camping in spite of a little adversity on the hike.

With all that, the kids had a great time. What made the difference was the advice we all got from people that had done it many times.

Duane

BlueTrain

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Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #29 on: August 15, 2019, 12:20:56 PM »
The place I usually go is a little damp in places. It is in a park, though, and I walk past the end of the paved path, following mostly overgrown trails for some distance (not really very far, though). A two-mile walk takes me through several environments, including ordinary sidewalks, and varies with the exact direction I take. Likewise, conditions vary according to recent weather. The spring here was very wet but the last six weeks have been dry. There are other nearby places for walking and kayaking, too.

Two of these places that I have visited in the last week or two are lakes with a good path, mostly paved, all the way around. The one I walked yesterday around Lake Accotink, which you may have heard of, was about five or six miles. About half of it is paved, the rest gravel. That was between five and six miles, a pretty good tramp on a hot and humid trail, although it's an easy walk. I like the place I go better. Fewer people and more interesting things, although none of these places are suitable for nudity. None of the good places I know for nude hiking are nearby, all at least a hundred miles or so.

On the trip yesterday, there were about thirty high school kids, both boys and girls doing cross-country on the trail, too. Kids around here are so much more fit than when I was in high school.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 01:14:08 PM by BlueTrain »