Author Topic: Forest bathing  (Read 590 times)

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3427
    • View Profile
Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #30 on: August 15, 2019, 07:39:22 PM »
The place that I was was all up and down steep. There was a section which was less so because of the stream bed size. That was a nice stroll, but 9000 ft high was tough on unaccustomed lungs. Not used to this, the calves and hips were used to excess. The place wasn't a bug problem. Only a few really big black ants. I could see 'em coming and they are harmless. I had to squat a whole lot doing chores, which is good, but then there was lower back pains, as I'm not used to so much of it. Then there was the crappy sleeping position. Not level place to be found.

If  stayed any longer, I'm sure that one leg would be longer than the other.

All factors considered, I was tired when I got back after only 2 1/2 hours, (the last half of an hour fast and very uphill) of hike on top of the rest of the day's activities round camp and crappy sleeping positions.

I'm back to working out regularly. I'll probably improve.

One comment from an encounter, "Sure is good to be out of the city." It is a beautiful place, green fluorescence, diversity, calming water, full moon luminescence....
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 915
    • View Profile
Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #31 on: August 15, 2019, 11:10:10 PM »
There are cities and there are big cities. It takes a long time to get out of the big city. Small cities and towns, though, can be nice. A fifteen minute drive can sometimes get you to well outside the city. But a great deal depends on where you are. Some places, the rural areas have lots of people living there. There is no place to go. That is, everything is private property and somewhere that people don't take kindly to trespassing. But sometimes there are places that no one seems to own, although such places are disappearing, at least everywhere I've lived. The reality is that someone always owned them but are now being less tolerant of unauthorized visitors. They are nearly always corporate interests. Mining companies, timber companies and people who lease federally owned land for one reason or another. The latter can be very particular about their leasing rights. Places where there has been mining can be rather dangerous and for that reason, access is now more difficult.

None of this makes much difference to me now, as my trips have become closer to home.

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2328
    • View Profile
Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #32 on: August 27, 2019, 04:31:48 PM »
Thereís nothing more annoying than discovering that youíve put your tent in a bad spot. From experience, I always lay down in the tent to make sure there are no rocks or roots lurking. Itís one reason I prefer smaller free standing tents. Just grab it and move it.

If there is a slope, sleep with your head uphill or you will wake up with a pounding headache. I check for these things before dragging all the stuff inside.

Duane

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3427
    • View Profile
Re: Forest bathing
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2019, 05:46:39 AM »
I did all of those steps before dragging the stuff inside. Yup, a little experimentation goes a long way. There was no place else to go. I just made the best of a bad situation and survived. It was more akin to sleeping in a hammock on my side.

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.