Author Topic: The Secret Naturist Handbook  (Read 11665 times)

Bob Knows

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #225 on: February 13, 2020, 04:26:45 PM »
What do you put on your card?    Do you put your name and address like a normal business card?  Or do you simply put some wordage about Naked hiking?  I might try that. 
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
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jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #226 on: February 13, 2020, 06:28:16 PM »
It would seem that the choice would be yours. I wouldn't do name and address, but I might reference this forum, or other websites. It would be fun notification in a geocache container.
Jbee
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Bob Knows

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #227 on: February 13, 2020, 07:13:45 PM »
It would be fun notification in a geocache container.
Jbee

That it would.   I print card stock on my ink jet printer.
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
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jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #228 on: February 15, 2020, 07:41:54 PM »
Cleanup Kit: From The Secret Naturist Handbook

Keeping clean is an important factor to consider for the secret naturist, for two main reasons. One, for basic health and two, to help maintain your cover. A family member or relative finding dirt where dirt just should not be, could result in you having some explaining to do. For these reasons I've pulled together a small clean-up kit that hold a few useful items. The list below contains all the items that are available from my clean-up kit but not all are taken on every outing. Only what is required for a specific outing are carried.

Basic Kit

Only three items comprise the basic clean-up kit, two small handkerchiefs and a metal nail cleaning tool. These have a permanent home on each of my two larger bumbags, the Peak Runner and Mesa Runner. They cope with most circumstances such as cleaning feet and toe nails after walking barefoot, legs after walking across muddy terrain and the two handkerchiefs will cope, at a pinch, for drying off after some spur of the moment skinny dipping.

Extended Kit

In addition to the above items, when the outing dictates, I add a small field towel. This is taken when I am specifically going to be getting wet such as on skinny dipping or where mud is involved. The field towel is for drying off. Two other items, a comb for looking after hair and a nail brush also form part of this kit but are rarely used. As a spectacle wearer, a small pack of tissues also comes in useful. All the above are housed in a small stuff sack, kept in the car to be available when required.
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #229 on: February 15, 2020, 07:44:41 PM »
I generally sun dry after a dip and wear a hat, so no comb. The body takes care of itself. I can clean my feet with grass and puddles.
Jbee
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jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #230 on: February 15, 2020, 07:48:49 PM »
Emergency Kit: From The Secret Naturists Handbook

Over the years I've put together a few small but potentially indispensable items, that might make a difference in an emergency situation such as the car being stolen and having to find my way home late at night.

My emergency kit consists of the following items:
1. Small change and some money to phone home with or to pay for a taxi.
2. A selection of waterproof plasters for those inevitable cuts and scratches associated with walking barefoot or wearing sandals.
3. One pair of socks. In the event of a long walk home and when wearing only sandals, socks make all the difference and prevent blisters from forming.
4. Plastic whistle to attract attention should I be unable to get out of a problem situation.
5. One large handkerchief. Used for washing, drying and could be used as a loin cloth in emergencies.
6. Small button compass for direction finding.

All the above items live in the base of both my Peak Runner and Mesa Runner bumbags, taking up little space or weight but worth their weight in gold should the occasion arise.
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #231 on: February 15, 2020, 07:51:35 PM »
Tweezers for prickers and some toilet paper to wiping, nose, etc. A zip lock for the TP. I have a tent stake that digs holes, and doubles as a weapon, a tool, sharp edge, etc.

I carry a phone, if the reception is available. A partner is the best in an emergency.
Jbee
« Last Edit: February 15, 2020, 07:54:22 PM by jbeegoode »
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Bob Knows

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #232 on: February 15, 2020, 10:43:43 PM »
I like to carry a basic first aid kit in my day pack.  My emergency kit includes small candle, fire starter, mini flashlight, small knife, and TP. 
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

BlueTrain

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #233 on: February 15, 2020, 11:18:08 PM »
This is evolving into advice for hiking. But that's okay. I still go hiking, even though I don't often get very far out of town. It's the cost of gas, you know.

Although I still have a "no-backup" (that is, a no cover-up) on my list of things to do, I hike nude when it is possible and practical, which isn't that much, unfortunately. I generally carry a small pack with a few things all the time, mainly to keep in practice for long hikes. I'm not sure if I really need to carry anything at all and sometimes I carry only what fits into my pockets. But for the long hikes, nude or not, this is what I carry:

Water, poncho, a little 1st aid kit, some toilet paper, something to eat, sometimes a map and compass, and a sort of emergency pouch. In cold weather I'll carry coffee in a thermos and a mug and still a little water. I also carry a small plastic trash bag, a small plastic bag for trash and a ground cloth (a square of plastic) and foam pad (for sitting on and to stiffen the frameless pack). If I expect rain, I also carry an umbrella. If I am planning to hike nude, I leave the car already nude but with something to wear in the pack. Sometimes I don't take enough to wear, to be honest.

I used to carry a more or less complete 1st aid kit. Everything you read says to, so I did. But having done so for 40 years, I decided that what I carried wasn't adequate for a real emergency and was mostly unnecessary for what it was good for. I still carry something, though, but only an army field dressing and a selection of band-aids, mostly large. I figured that the worst thing that could happen that I could treat myself with what I could carry was a serious cut or puncture wound, so that's what I attempted to prepare for. A bad fall resulting in a broken bone would probably be a lot worse but I don't know what you might carry for that. Anyway, my so-called first aid kit is about the size of a pack of cards.

That so-called emergency pouch that now forms part of my "always carry" outfit contains a candle, small flashlight, matches, a food bar, a knife, fork and spoon set and maybe something else. Don't remember and I'm not going to go downstairs to check. I had this zippered pouch that I thought was perfect for making up this emergency kit and that's about what would fit inside. That's the most of a survival kit I've ever put together and I only did that last year. In about fifty years of tramping through woods, parks, canal towpaths and strip mines, I think I've used a couple of band-aids and that's about it for "emergencies." But if I didn't take anything, I'm sure I'd need something and desperately.

I still take the regular 1st aid kit when travelling and for overnights. Aspirin is sometimes used.

Reading back over this, I note that I have simplified things fairly well but what I miss or have lost are the spontaneous hikes from my younger days when I took none of that stuff, sometimes even leaving the clothes behind.

jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #234 on: February 17, 2020, 05:40:59 AM »
Take the stuff out, make a base in the tooleys and walk naked from there...or not....
Jbee
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jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #235 on: February 17, 2020, 05:44:01 AM »
Incidentally, I'm out of the country and away from my usual computer till first of the month. I don't know how much time that I'll have to post and this will cause a break in the HAndbook thread for that short time.
Jbee
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nuduke

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #236 on: February 23, 2020, 11:01:02 PM »
Incidentally, I'm out of the country and away from my usual computer till first of the month. I don't know how much time that I'll have to post and this will cause a break in the HAndbook thread for that short time.
Jbee

Out of the country, Jbee?
My curiosity is roused, and no mistake!
Where are you visiting?  Holiday?
John

Safebare

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #237 on: February 24, 2020, 10:15:56 PM »
S & I just returned from a week in Zipolite Mexico, getting to spend several overlap days with JBee and DF. They are still there, taking over our beach front balcony room, returning to AZ next weekend, I think.
That's assuming they don't fall under the spell & extend their stay. I will let them describe the trip. Of course we got along as old friends would, even though we had never met in the skin. S warmed up to them equally quickly even though she was only recently introduced to this blog and their website.
 ~Safebare

nuduke

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #238 on: February 28, 2020, 09:34:21 PM »

Oh - how nice that you all met up.
Is 'S' also a naturist?
John

jbeegoode

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Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #239 on: March 01, 2020, 09:55:16 PM »
Keys: Gear: From The Secret Naturist Handbook

The safe carrying and storage of keys, particularly car keys, is important for secret naturists, some of whom may depend on their vehicle to get home. The loss of a key through accidental dropping can be a problem. Keep keys secure in the bottom of your bum bag, in a zipped pocket or attached to a key clip inside the bumbag. All my bumbags have both zipped pockets and clips, and are used at all times to secure keys and also other small items. Keep car keys with electronic gadgets dry inside a polythene bag.
In urban areas, some secret naturist hide their clothing yet carry their keys with them. This could pose a problem should they be accosted by youths or detained by police. With the former, they might actually loose the car and with the latter, the fact you are carrying keys alerts the police to you actually having a vehicle which they can identify you by.
A few hints & tips on keeping keys safe:
   If you have clothing with zipped pockets, use them to secure your keys against loss.
   Hide separately from clothing - loose on ground under pile of leaves. If clothing lost, keys will be okay.
   Use an elastic band to prevent them making a noise. Or just carry the keys you actually need at the time.
   Hide a spare with the car using a magnetic box attached somewhere e.g. under the bodywork.
   Keep house & car keys separate. If you loose one at least you will have the other.
Because of their importance, it can be worth the cost of getting spare sets of keys cut and taking them with you, particularly when travelling far from home or away from bus routes or other means of transport.
Barefoot all over, all over.