Author Topic: The Secret Naturist Handbook  (Read 30508 times)

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4070
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #465 on: January 13, 2021, 06:30:06 PM »
A chill can develop after a while. It is nice to wipe the moister off, if it is breezy. If I'm going several miles, I'll usually have a little luggage. A light plastic rain cover takes very little space and weighs a couple of ounces. The mountain rain can feel chilly because of the lower temperatures.

There could be a case when one might be injured, twisted ankle, snakebite, or lost. I've been delayed into the night where it is dangerous to be walking around alone with no moon particularly. Now, I carry a flashlight, if that potential is there. Those insti emergency sleeping bags weigh little, little space and work pretty good, if the inner moister doesn't build up too much. They are probably designed for people with clothing to augment their effects. I've never used one.

Probably never need emergency equipment, though. Way out in remote areas nude is great, but practical caution is always good. These boyscout/survivalist tricks are good to know anyway. Although here, there is not much for quick shelter in the desert. For the time it would take to get a shelter (let alone the critters that are out there, ie. scorpions) in the desert, the time could be well spent walking, or crawling out. I don't get that far from base without a pack with a complete home.

You probably remember how quick the temperatures drop in the desert. An hour can mean 30F degrees.

I try to have a partner with me.
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4070
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #466 on: January 19, 2021, 05:05:29 AM »
Hidden Hazards: From The Secret Naturist Handbook

As secret naturists we find ourselves naked and often barefoot in the Great Outdoors and while our main concern is about being seen by members of the public, there are also many other hidden hazards as well. This page looks at a few common things to watch out for.

Walking barefoot probably posed the greatest threat from hidden hazards. No matter what the terrain there can be hazards lurking just out of sight waiting for that naked foot to fall. The most obvious are small stones and rocks that are easily missed. Not only can sharp edges cause a cut but even small pebbles can be uncomfortable to walk on. Broken glass and metal items such as ring pulls are also a problem and these are more likely found on some areas than others.

When walking near a fence line it is likely that the fence will have been repaired or replaced at some time in the past. Look out for old fence wire protruding from the undergrowth and also for staples carelessly dropped by the fencer. Barbed wire is used regularly where fields contain livestock. Similarly when walking along the line of dry stone walls, fallen stones are a risk, particularly when going through long grass.

In urban areas hidden hazards would include nasty items such as dog shit, broken glass, metal cans and even discarded needles. In fact, I would recommend footwear be worn at all times in urban areas, although tarmac footpaths and roads are generally safer than other types of surface. On golf courses watch out for broken golf tees, golf balls and ground hugging thistles in the rough.

In woodland, branches, both on the tree and fallen, are the most obvious hazard for the secret naturist. All parts of the body are at risk from an unseen branch, so stay alert and look where you are going, not just at the ground but all the way up to head height as well. Thick undergrowth can conceal all manner if hazards, including those mentioned above with problem plants like bramble, nettle and thistle joining the list.

On the beach, even the most innocuous looking stretch of sand might have a few surprises. Watch out for stranded jellyfish, sharp edges of shells, broken glass, unexploded bombs, rocks and so on. Dune grass can also leave cuts and marks on bare legs.

It might seen impossible to avoid these hidden hazards, particularly if walking barefoot, but you soon become adept as looking for these hidden hazards and also at recognising the locations where they are most likely to be found.

Other Hazards:

Water
Hypothermia
Dogs
Insects
Route
Snakes
Sunburn
Surveillance
Ticks


« Last Edit: January 19, 2021, 05:08:09 AM by jbeegoode »
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4070
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #467 on: January 19, 2021, 05:08:53 AM »
The next section will be "plant Hazards."
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4070
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #468 on: January 19, 2021, 05:14:55 AM »
Holy Imperilment Batman!!!

I tend to keep my head down on the look out. Often, it gets in the way of seeing the rest. Thank God for toe shoes!
How does one get by barefoot like they do?
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

John P

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
    • View Profile
    • My naturist page
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #469 on: January 19, 2021, 04:08:34 PM »
JBG, you're thinking of life in the desert! In temperate areas, it's possible to get by barefoot, but most of us still find it too uncomfortable to do it much. Some people hike in sandals, and that's what I do in easy locations, but when I'm on rocky trails, I always hurt my feet somehow if I don't wear boots.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4070
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #470 on: January 19, 2021, 07:24:23 PM »
In Michigan, I was barefooted all summer as a teenager...then, I was placed in the desert. I wore cowboy boots mostly for decades.

As a boy in Virginia, often barefoot, just shorts was the norm. Guess "temperate" would be like that, but what is hidden under the leaves on a trail? I remember mud...then, here come the desert the first time.

France was temperate, but it was cold and wet, 300 days a year. There were no natural forests for me there. Farmland and parks and a neighborhood loaded with asphalt sidewalks. Those were okay. In New Mexico, I remember sinking into hot asphalt like mud on summer days.

I truly enjoyed Zipolite barefoot everywhere. The only hazard was the hot sand in the afternoon between the hotel and the wet by the water.

Off trail in the Tucson Mountains has been a constant cholla pricker watch.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Safebare

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 177
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #471 on: January 19, 2021, 07:37:42 PM »
Spent summers @ the beach growing up, always barefoot. I had 2 signficant foot injuries, 1 involving broken glass and a bloody hop over a mile to get home. The other was surfing and stepped on something in the water, likely a nail or spike. Nearly pierced my foot. Went to the dr on that one.  But I could walk across Texas asphalt in August or even the beach sand without notice. I remember running through lots filled with grass burrs simply sliding my feet across the grass to dislodge them. Couldn't do any of that today.
~Safebare

Bob Knows

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1583
  • Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
    • View Profile
    • Greenbare Photos
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #472 on: January 19, 2021, 07:49:57 PM »
I've been barefoot for more than 5 years, summer and most of the winter.   I have encountered those pieces of discarded barbed wire hidden near fences -- OUCH, but not serious injury.   You do have to pay attention to where you walk barefoot. 

Ticks are said to be more likely to attack textiles than nudists.  They apparently want to hide under fur to bite, and can't find "fur" on nudists.  Easier to see and remove. 

I've lived and hiked in rattlesnake country all my life.  Never had a problem with them.   Give them half a chance and they will go hide.

I've found that the biggest hazards of going barefoot is fractured stone "gravel" used for roads and driveways, and those "tack weeds" that thrive in hot city climates.  They are hell on bicycle tires too.   Up-tight store owners and staffs are also a hazard.   For unknown reason they attack anyone barefoot. 



Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

John P

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
    • View Profile
    • My naturist page
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #473 on: Today at 12:23:07 AM »
Remember Huck Finn "was always the first boy that went barefoot in the spring and the last to resume leather in the fall" making it pretty clear that all the boys (girls too?) went barefoot in summer. If that was routine for American children, I wonder when it ended and what the social factors were.

I recall seeing a fair number of adults going around barefoot in New Zealand, even in supermarkets, which wouldn't be allowed in Britain or America.