Author Topic: The Secret Naturist Handbook  (Read 52625 times)

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1852
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #615 on: December 06, 2021, 12:07:07 AM »
Indeed.  The average weather at this time of year in the UK is grey, damp and 35-50F.  As you remark, when there is even a slight breeze in these conditions it chills the body fast and makes outdoor nakedness extremely uncomfortable to unbearable.  If it's raining in these conditions the drops fall on your skin like 1000 little needles! 
Conditions that I much prefer in winter are those when it is icy cold 30-40F clear skies and perfectly still air, if snowy, so much the better.  In these conditions the skin glows with the cold and it is so much more tolerable.  If there is winter sun then enjoyable much the better.


Dan does seem to be more than averagely hardy!


Ricc and Davie - you guys are out working and hiking respectively in the colder months and indeed in the depths of winter sometimes.  What sort of conditions do you find that you can endure for long periods in the winter? 


I get few opportunities to walk naked on such days so I suppose the exercise does keep you warmer than I imagine - this is because much of my experience outside in the cold is just doing the ordinary things domestically  - gardening and leaf clearing and such - where you are generating less internal heat.


John

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #616 on: December 07, 2021, 06:41:11 PM »
It finally got a bit cold around here. I have some workers around, so I have been dressed for that. Dang these clothes feel clammy! They are warm, but I feel stuffed in sweat shirt and pants, I shower more to compensate.

I had to deal with some old broken bags of lime the other day. Maybe, that is best to do in ragged clothing, rather than finding my nude body decomposing. :D

I used a grinder to cut a metal building down in size. Best with face shield, hat gloves and clothing to avoid sparks.

I had to work on the roof of that building. I noticed that the neighbors could see me when up near the top rung. Had to put on shorts.

Looks like I found three situations where clothing is handy, better nude, but an icky necessity.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

ric

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 410
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #617 on: December 09, 2021, 10:04:06 AM »
cold , sunny, still days are ok provided the body is active,  either working or a brisk walk.

several years ago i went for fresh air about 5 pm on xmas day,   dark starlit night , no wind, frost on the grass, even icy puddles  in the grass,   did a brisk walk lap of a 10 acre field wearing shoes an a woolly hat.

then back to a house full of rellies stuffin their faces.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #618 on: December 09, 2021, 05:31:16 PM »
My best claim to frozen fame was this New Years morning a few years ago. We roamed at one point, give or take a half an hour in the freeze and snow. We went out numerous times totally obsessed by the joy of it all. There was no wind. Maybe a half short half a mile from home in only boots and hat and gloves, the extremities.

https://thefreerangenaturist.org/2016/12/23/a-new-year/#more-2135
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1852
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #619 on: December 12, 2021, 10:13:03 PM »
Nice to be reminded of that blog, Jbee.
What was so wonderful about your old house was that you could just wander off from your back garden into the desert night quite safely and the same the next morning.
How long did the snow last?  Was it all gone the next day?  In Britain a heavy fall of snow occasionally leaves a crisp sunny day in its wake making everything white and glittering....for a few hours.  Then the disruption commences as the temperature rises again (or we may not even get the crisp sunny day) - What usually happens is that is then followed by several days of dirty slush everywhere, gradually melting, slowing down traffic and generally making the world grim and sombre.  No residual muddy puddles and muddy ground in Az I would expect as the snow probably quickly sublimes in the sun or the melt water is gratefully absorbed into the dry ground.
John



jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #620 on: December 14, 2021, 03:20:13 AM »
A snowfall lasting past noon the next day, is a rare event indeed, in Arizona.

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #621 on: December 19, 2021, 08:29:34 AM »
Fog: From "The Secret Naturist Handbook"

You might not think that fog or mist would be of any great benefit to the secret naturist, but this is far from being the case. Fog and mist offer something that the secret naturist desires, cover and concealment. When fog or mist is present visibility is reduced, making many locations that would otherwise be out of bounds now available. Locations that are normally too exposed to view are now shrouded in a concealing blanket of fog or mist.

Traprain Law is a small hill near Haddington in East Lothian and makes a good example of how early morning mist can be used to our advantage. Normally, the hill is open and exposed to the surrounding farms and traffic on the roads. However, when the hill is shrouded in early morning mist, you are able to strip off quite low down on the hill side and can ascend the hill without fear of being seen. You can also explore the whole hill top without being seen, although the views are somewhat lacking!

As well as using early morning mist as mentioned above, thick fog can also be used to our advantage. At Aberlady Bay Nature Reserve along the East Lothian coast, the tides recedes some considerable distance at low tide, allowing you to get well away from the walkers along the beach. However, you are still quite exposed to view. When sea fog rolls in you have great opportunity for secret naturism. The fog effectively hides you from view and few people venture far from the beach at these times.

Of course, you need to know what you are doing under such weather conditions. You should already be familiar with the location and know your way around. You must also be aware of the tides when visiting the coast as mentioned above.
Fog and mist have a few characterises that we as secret naturists need to be aware of. The most obvious is that while we are hidden from view so to is anyone approaching and there may be little in the way of warning. However, as quickly as people may appear, they vanish just as quickly. Fog and mist also temp to lower the air temperature and you may find it quite cold at times.

One important thing to be aware of, and I was almost caught out once, is that early morning mist will usually clear quite quickly once the sun has risen. On one occasion I was planning to ascend a particular hillside using the cover proved by the mist. I was also planning to leave my clothing at the car and travel with nothing but my sports sandals. For some reason I changed my mind and carried my clothing with me. Of course, when I was returning back to the car the mist was there one minute and suddenly gone the next. This would have left me quite exposed to traffic on the busy trunk road below. It would have been interesting getting back without being seen.
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #622 on: December 19, 2021, 08:43:35 AM »
Thick fog is nearly nil around here, Arizona. Fog doesn't last and is generally limited to the foothills. I have walked a golf course in the evening's fog up in Pinetop, Az. When it is warm enough, there is a certain special sensual sensation in the fog. On a body the thick air brings a fun feeling.

The west coast (USA) gets fog in the mornings, well into the mornings, on its many beaches and forest trails. Driving to those places can be dangerous, however.

This would seem more a British Ilse thing, famous for fog. You all even have yellow headlights to cope with your frequent fog. I'd like to read some anecdotes, or even stories about naked in the fog.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Peter S

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 534
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #623 on: December 20, 2021, 06:33:31 AM »
Yellow headlights? Another transatlantic misconception at work. When I was a kid if we had a motoring holiday to the continent (the European one, that is) we had to put clip-on yellow filters over our white headlights for some reason that now escapes me. But in the UK? Nope. You may be getting confused by old film of cars in the London smog - the smog was so smoke-laden the headlights probably looked yellow!
« Last Edit: December 21, 2021, 10:39:51 AM by Peter S »
____________________________________
Motorcycling, history, country hiking,
naked living

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #624 on: December 21, 2021, 05:24:14 AM »
Lived in Paris, visited London via a ferry one weekend, almost 60 years ago...

Guess I forgot the detail.... :o
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Peter S

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 534
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #625 on: December 21, 2021, 10:41:40 AM »
BAck then any UK cars on the ferry would have been sporting the yellow clip-ons so easy to get the wrong idea.
____________________________________
Motorcycling, history, country hiking,
naked living

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1852
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #626 on: December 24, 2021, 03:45:32 PM »
Ha Ha! 
Quote
This would seem more a British Ilse thing, famous for fog. You all even have yellow headlights to cope with your frequent fog.
That's an archaic observation, Jbee.
Those yellow headlamp covers were not for fog (as far as I can remember).  They were for travelling in Europe and elsewhere by car.  Because we drive on the left in UK, our headlamps are biased to beam slightly left.  When travelling in Europe it is, I believe, a legal requirement that you cover the headlights with deflectors which cancel out or reverse the left bias, so that it doesn't dazzle drivers on the other side when driving in right hand drive Europe (or US for that matter).  In, like, the 1960's, for some reason these were always a yellow filter,  Nowadays they are clear and made of a mesh.  That said, I have never seen a European vehicle driving in the uk with deflectors - but then again, you don't see that too often and I guess I haven't looked! :)
Nowadays we have fog lights incorporated in the vehicle light clusters.  We need them rarely.  The Clean Air Act 1956 completely removed he terrible choking fogs we used to have regularly in the Autumn and Winter in the 1950s and 60s.


I remember particularly one summer holiday in Spain where our apartment was just a few yards from the beach.  On a couple of occasions a sea fog drifted over the land and enveloped us all in a cool, clean, mist with very little visibility.  Unfortunately this was not a fully naturist experience but I was dressed only in swim trunks.  It was beautiful and cool contrasting the hot sun of only minutes earlier.  A lovely silence fell on the resort as the fog was very sound absorbing and I laid back on my sun bed enjoying the welcome moist coolness.  Sadly this lasted but minutes or maybe half an hour before the fog bank evaporated under the punishing glare of the noonday Spanish sun above!
John

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #627 on: January 05, 2022, 04:00:06 AM »
 have always enjoyed fog, when it has dropped into my life. It is an unusual alien environmental transformation...ie. FUN.

I love the quiet, the sense of some kind on intimate solitude in a natural place with a sense of housing, roof and walls.

It feels like quite and experience, with a wow effect, out driving in it every ten or twenty years.

It is something different. 
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #628 on: January 10, 2022, 07:51:54 AM »
Hot Weather: Partly from "The Secret Naturist Handbook."

When I opened up the next chapter, there was nothing in the folder! The title is “Hot Weather.” I suppose we could fill in the blank spaces on this topic. This is my Arizona kinda territory…So, off the top of my head, I’ll get the ball rolling.
There are basically two types of hot weather, dry and wet. Either way, TAKE PLENTY OF WATER!

My desert is dry. The temperatures can shoot up into highs of way plus 100F. Fortunately, they plunge each day after sundown 20 to 30 degrees and more, not picking up until mid- morning the next day. Hike in the morning before the heat, or a full moon hike in the desert is fabulous.

The wet regions have a less dramatic temperature variation, generally.

Clouds are a relief, like shade on a hot one. I like seeking shade in a riparian area, or forest.

I get accustomed to the heat. I get acclimated to around 102F for walking. Anything more gets too dangerous. This only works when I am fully naked, just shoes and a shady brimmed hat. Any amount of clothing, even a pair of underwear makes a considerable difference.

My skin gets accustomed to the intense sun; still, I’ll generally carry something to protect my shoulders, in case I find that I’ll stay out longer than planned.

I wouldn’t expect many people to be acclimated to this. Jumping into heat is dangerous. It does make it safer to walk outside nude. People just don’t come outside. Few even look out of their windows, particularly bedroom windows. There is little risk to getting a complaint, if no one is there to complain. I have had numerous people on a hot day comment that nude makes sense, when they have happened upon us.

The wet heat, like forests, humidity back east, or jungles can wear me down much quicker than dry heat. There is generally some water to dip into and cool off.  In the desert, we sometimes wet a cloth for around the neck, or a shirt. It works for a little while, but on a truly hot day, I’ll stay bare.

Anybody want to fill in on wet heat?
Jbee

Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4440
    • View Profile
Re: The Secret Naturist Handbook
« Reply #629 on: January 10, 2022, 05:58:35 PM »
Hot surfaces:

I helped a 94 year old friend back to health. He has Neuropathy and had been out in his garden barefoot, watering on a hot day. He has his back yard paved with all sorts of substances. He had burnt feet nearly to the bone.

We can literally fry eggs on rock surfaces and sidewalks.

The man made surfaces are worse. I can feel the difference from dark and lighter rock on my bare feet.

I remember darting from sidewalks to green lawns in Michigan. Urban sidewalks and metal objects can be scalding. We Arizonans can drive a car with two fingers lightly dancing across the steering-wheel. I have been branded by seat-belt holders on my hip. A towel is a great habit on any hot day car's seat.

I prefer bare foot at anytime, but it isn't practical everywhere. We should naturally be able to use bare locomotion anywhere, but even primitive societies make shoes for occasions. Foot conditioning males a mitigating difference.

Climbing rocks can be tough on hand's grip, or sliding a body across nude. I've taken more difficult routes than slip up a hot rock. Hot surfaces can sometimes be traversed, if you are quick enough. A burn increases as a matter of time. More often than not, it is just a passing discomfort.

A warm rock after a cool plunge is one of the greatest pleasures known to man and nude all over makes it even better.
A splash of water cools a hot surface, if you've got it.

Jbee

Barefoot all over, all over.