Author Topic: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons  (Read 814 times)

jmf

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Re: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2020, 10:04:05 PM »

  Has your injury fully healed?
John
[/quote]

Well, it was during lockdown for the epidemics. So double containment. No hiking and running for a while!
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

nuduke

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Re: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2020, 10:56:39 PM »

  Has your injury fully healed?
John

Yes and no.  The cut has healed completely but the ball of my thumb has a hard pad about 7 or 8mm diameter under the skin where feeling has not returned and it's a bit over sensitive to knocks and pressure.  I am hoping this will gradually repair but as a friend who accidentally put their fingers in a hand blender some months before my injury remarked, recovery is a very slow business.  My thumb may not fully return to how it was before.  There is a scar of course, and the thumbprint doesn't unlock my phone any more as it has changed sufficiently to mismatch with its previous registered print! 
It's amazing how even such a small injury can cause significant disability.  When the finger was bandaged (several weeks) and after, I couldn't fasten my shirt buttons or pick small objects up (still challenging)!  It didn't take long to learn to do buttons without using my thumb but what surprised me was how very automatic the action was, done pretty much unconsciously, before the injury.  Made me think about the issues of disability in general.
John

BlueTrain

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Re: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2020, 02:48:39 AM »
Having sustained certain injuries, some requiring medical attention like stitches and clamps and so on, over the course of my short life (I'm 73), I think there is a certain part of disability that is more mental than physical. That's not to say that a disability is not crippling to some degree by any means but the willingness to cope with it needs to be there. In other words, you don't want a disability to stop you, even if it slows you down a little. But sooner or later, that's going to happen in the natural course of things anyway. Of course, there are people who like having an excuse to not do something and to stay in bed instead.

If you have any sense and you live long enough, eventually you learn to be really careful and not take so many chances.

nuduke

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Re: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2020, 09:08:19 PM »
Yes, I agree Blue Train.  Inevitably any disability has to be overcome in order to exist in whatever state you are with the disability.  Even if you are negative and depressed about it, you have to work round it in some respects.  Mind you, I never did turn down an opportunity to stay in bed a little longer in the mornings!  But not as a living space.  In my case we are talking about a tiny knob of numbness on one thumb (left) so not really a disability.  I was writing though about the extent to which even a very small inconvenience has its wider ramifications which you don't realise until its happened.


An example occurs of working around disability from some years ago when I did a bit of volunteer work for a very forward looking home for very disabled young adults, usually with a degree of cerebral palsy.  Most were confined to wheelchairs and with communication difficulties.  It was from that experience that I learned that there's no such thing as a 'standard' disability.  Everyone is unique.  The aim of the home was to help their inmates to independence in 3 years (like a degree) where independence often meant living using carers to varying degrees.  The home organised an amazing programme for each individual and groups to teach them all manner of stuff including drama and management.  I enquired why management was on their curriculum, as my na´ve, prejudiced mind thought that few would achieve a management role in a firm.  But that wasn't the aim.  The staff member I was talking to pointed out that when you are disabled you have so many management tasks, managing and scheduling carers and their provider firms, dealing with social services and benefits civil servants, medical staff and all the things you need to manage a residence (that most of us take for granted and do without thought).  And when you can only talk or type at a few words a minute or have to spell words out on a letter board to communicate, that takes management and organisational skill - so they get taught some of that. 
Most of the residents of that home may have been palsied and unable to move properly or talk properly but all were intelligent and bright, some had qualifications and all wanted to make their way in the world as independently as possible.  They were, of course, selected for that attribute and mental ability.  But it made you realise that disability was actually the norm for them and therefore aware of their motivation to prepare for their future life despite that disability.
John

BlueTrain

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Re: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons
« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2020, 11:44:04 PM »
I suppose that in the context of this forum, and to some extent, this thread, the only disability that we're interested in is mobility, or rather, the lack of mobility. When you have a disability, either permanent or temporary, that limits how well you can get around, your world suddenly shrinks. At worst, you're confined to your bed or at least your bedroom. But I think at least one person did the Appalachian Trail on crutches and another one covered the trail who was blind. Those were certainly exceptional individuals.

Supposedly if you have a disability, your remaining facilities are enhanced. But I don't know if that's true.

jbeegoode

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Re: Footwear for Nude Bodies: Pros and Cons
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2020, 02:49:29 AM »
It is very often miraculously true, but not necessarily, that another sense makes up for the loss. Brains rewire, need makes practice, awareness is relative to the task, opportunity or situation.

Teenagers have now been documented to have a sort of disconnect that explains why they do stupid things. However, during that stage of  life, what could be more beneficial than something that allows one to grow, explore, take risk, instead of hunker up and never live, or live safe and fearful.

My dad was confined to a chair, unable to speak, care for himself, even eating was generally a problem. Parkinsons, diabetes and degenerative blindness. He could listen to football, he was sharp as a tack, his focus was amazing. He would listen to me read for hours, say something out of the encyclopedia, when most people's minds trail off after about 20 minutes (so say the studies, I was a teacher). We're adaptive amazing and cared for, especially when humbled.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.