Author Topic: Ultra Light Backpacking  (Read 15353 times)

jbeegoode

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Ultra Light Backpacking
« on: September 20, 2013, 08:31:40 AM »
One of the things that limits my free range naturism is the heat. Most have cold weather, but Arizona gets way hot. A good compensator is to get to water, the more the better. Iím working towards expanding those options, now, in preparation for the next heat season.
Another is getting up into the mountains. We have sky islands here.While I was in Happy Valley a couple of weeks ago, I thought of the potential. It is always around 30 degrees cooler up in the mountains and water can be found in small streams. There is a whole town on Mt. Lemon called Summerhaven filled with cabins for people to retreat from our brutal heat seasons.
This one has a nice road, but lots of other people to deal with when looking to be nude. The water can be sparse or difficult to get to.

Two plus hours away, is an as of yet unexplored (by me) mountain with roads to the top where an observatory is located.

The rest are generally over populated, on Indian reservations or no roads up there.

There can be several miles hiking to the cooler lush and water bearing mountain areas, from down below.

So back to Happy Valley. There are many hiking trails up into the Rincon Mountains. I can hike up a few, part of the way, but I have to return doubling the distance. I could get to that point and then double it uphill and stay up there, if I camped there. One or two nights. The trip back is down hill.

I donít do a forty pound back pack like I used to. Iím 61 and things donít do what they used to do. No way could I do that. I decided to check on the state of the art backpacking. I found ďUltraliteĒ Itís was on the youtube and I went from there, across the internet and then to my local sporting goods store.

On Youtube was a guy carrying 12 pounds of gear across his waist. That seemed more doable. I could take it a step further. I could do it naked, taking away a few more pounds. Up there, it is a free zone.

 Hereís what I found out:

 I have been eating raw foods and have a dehydrator. I could make up a good soup and eat trail mix type things, that will rehydrate and be tasty and highly nutritious. Oatmeal, fruits, veggies and nuts. That would be great and comparatively light and easy.

One thing that gets heavy is carrying water. Up there, there are water sources. There are now $80 light weight purifiers that will clean crappy water at a rate of about two liters in four or five minutes. Less water, much less weight (something like 7 pounds per gallon.) There are three liter bladder style bags that now fit into the arrangement of the back pack distributing the weight. Iíve been using bulky insolated round liter bottles and now see the ďlightĒ. You can gather water more like as you need it, carrying even less.

Cooking has been brought down to less than 20 oz. of cooking gear. Small two oz. heater with some fuel. It is better than depending on a campfire, although a screen and light pot weigh even less. There can be fire restrictions and weather.

Shelter. It gets colder on top of those mountains and it can rain. There are small tents that weigh like three pounds and cost $300 plus dollars. They fold up very small. I found a cheap two man tent for $30 that weighs 4 pounds and packs as small as the smallest. It may have a cheap zipper. It may not last long, but I can sew in a good zip, spray on water sealer, or buy a dozen for the cost of one high end tent.

A sleeping bag that weighs less than three pounds and protects from the cold costs like its weight in silver. I found one for $40. The many reviews testify that it works down to 35F, but it has a crappy zipper. Its three pounds and packs as smaller than many high end bags. The zipper can be replaced with a quality one. The write-ups tell me that most of the zipper complaints came from people not being careful and throwing common sense out. Another huge savings.

I bought a three oz. windbreaker on sale for $8. A thick pair of sweats is one pound. A long sleeve T-shirt, six oz. Socks for my five toes. That with a bag and tent will work. If Iím out nude in the day, I wonít be in temperatures that drop down passed those at night.

A mat is a few oz. and $8 to &10, but it would be bulk, tied to the outside of the three pound back pack.

A small LCD flashlight and three extra triple AAAís and some odds and ends and thatís about 12 pounds. With clothing a couple more pounds. With dehydrated food, less that two pounds more  I havenít gotten exact yet, but adding water would make a lot of food.

Water, two or three liters would be a kilo each.

Now Iím thinking this is way better than the 40 pounds that I lugged around South America in the seventies. I took my day pack and inserted four two liter bottles of water, which is around 17 pounds. I took it for a walk. I fell out like back when I was way out of shape. It got very heavy, very soon. There is more honing to be done. The big question is can I return to that kind of shape? Can my girlfriend get on board with it? Iíll see, and practice this with the water weighted pack.

The other heat adaptation would be water. Iím thinking kayak. I can get to the far ends of a lake, to beaches and more remote hiking, but the return is a limiter as with climbing mountains. Camping and returning the next day, or so, gets me out further. A Kayak will hold just so much and maneuver. Going down Arizona rivers is another playground requiring stability. These same ultra light weight options would help to fit geer into a kayak for camping.

Hereís a thread asking/sharing what we know about backpacking and kayak/canude/boating, and applying this to free range naturism. What do you think?
Jbee




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Karla

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2013, 02:17:11 PM »
Aha! One of my favourite subjects!

There was a time when I spent a lot of time and money on trying to get lightweight camping equipment. It is time well spent. I found that reducing the weight of your equipment normally comes at the expenses of reducing your comfort. So it's a choice of discomfort when walking or discomfort when camping. But sometimes reducing the weight of your equipment becomes a necessity.

One reason why I wanted to reduce the weight, and importantly also, the size, of my equipment was so that I could store it in the back pocket of a paraglider harness in case I landed out in the boonies in the highlands of Scotland. There have been tales of people actually wrapping their paragliding canopy around them to protect themselves from the midges at night when they sleep. Another reason for going lightweight for me is that my Hasselblad equipment is extremely heavy. It seems silly to save grams on the outdoor equipment and then carry such heavy camera equipment, but the saving needs to be made somewhere.

I bought a water purifier but never actually got round to using it. It was never too warm that I ran out of water in Scotland. And now I don't actually bring it with my because there have been times when I've been desperate for water in the Alps but haven't found any water source at all. The last time we went hiking it was 35 degrees and we bought 3 litres of water each and couldn't find a stream to fill them up again.

I suffer from the heat as well but can easily cope with the cold when i am out and about. Ironically though I am a cold sleeper which means that it is difficult for me to stay warm in a tent at night. I suspect I have a very fast metabolism but not too much bodily insulation.

I have a go-lite day sack which I have used several times in Scotland but the bottom is starting to get worn down after bum-sliding down a few too many rocky slopes. I also bought an Nimbus Ozone which is an excellent bag but I never used it in the end. I've always intended to go on multi-day camping trips but it never happened. I can heartily recommend the PHD minimus range of sleeping bags! I have three of them. An ultra-lite one for low level camping, a medium one and an expedition rated one. I used the expedition rated one for use on top of Scottish mountains in summer (as I said, I am a cold sleeper) while Stuart has the medium rated one. If we were sleeping at low altitude I'd use the medium one and he'd use the thinnest one.

For tents we primarily use a Terra Nova (Solar 2 I think), even at camp  sites. I originally bought a Robert Saunders 1-person tent and we have used that as a 2-person bivvy tent on a mountain before. That only weighs 1.3 kilograms. We also use 3/4 length Thermarests, although I bring a third one and use it for our feet to make them equivalent of full length. There have been some even lighter tents released since I bought this equipment about ten years ago although from what I can tell what you gain from the lighter weight in carrying you lose in discomfort during use because the material is so thin is flaps around and makes a lot of noise at night.

I've been intending to buy a dehydrator for ages, especially for use for when we eventually do manage a multi-day camping trip into the most remote areas of the highlands of Scotland. An hour before you want to start cooking, you put some water in the bag with the dried food and the movement from walking and climbing mixes it all up for you. Sounds fantastic. We calculated the amount of weight the food would take up for 5 days of wild camping and it was prohibitive. We very bother trying to cook food when wild camping. It's just easier to bring cold snacks, especially in Scotland when the midges are out.

It really depends upon your environment. A lot of light weight discussion focused on American environments and advocated hammocks and tarps. That sounds great and I should revisit the idea in the German and Austrian Alps. In Scotland you want four season two layer tents in summer, if only to keep out the humming creeping blood sucking death trying every milimetre to see if there is a way in (I'm talking about midges again here)






jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2013, 08:03:24 PM »
Around here, the tent is mostly to protect from bugs, spiders, scorpions, and snakes. Rain is usually predictable (generally none). I've used campfire smoke and incense to deter mosquitoes and no-see-ums. Does that help with Scottish midges? Are they out all day or just around dusk? I've heard of huge mosquitoes in Alaska making it impossible to be naked, unless you were born with a fur coat and tail. I've also heard that some have been known to carry away tents with the campers inside. ;)
Jbee
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Karla

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2013, 08:22:19 PM »
Smoke works on the highland midge as well. They aren't out all the time and you soon learn to recognise situations where you just stay indoors. They don't like the sun or the wind. The wind is more of a deterrent than then the sun. Calm evenings can be a nightmare, especially near a loch or a sea. Unfortunately Scotland is one huge bog with mountains sticking out of it so there is no shortage of ground for them to breed in. Same goes for the locals too.

stuart

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2013, 08:26:05 PM »
you soon learn to recognise situations where you just stay indoors. 

Such as mid-July to October  :P

eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2013, 08:47:07 PM »
Quote from: Jbee
I took my day pack and inserted four two liter bottles of water, which is around 17 pounds. I took it for a walk.

A day pack will kill you if it's loaded, all the weight is on your shoulders.  Make sure you have a waist belt so the load is transferred to your hips and the loosen the shoulder straps so that they only stabilize the load, not carry it.  The work is much easier.

My biggest drawback is the pack.  Mine is a bit heavy, 5-7 lbs.  They're not cheap but if you are going to do a lot of hiking light, it might be worth it to get a lightweight pack.

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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2013, 08:33:44 PM »
Eyesup wrote: "A day pack will kill you if it's loaded, all the weight is on your shoulders.  Make sure you have a waist belt so the load is transferred to your hips and the loosen the shoulder straps so that they only stabilize the load, not carry it.  The work is much easier."

Ah ha! That's why it cured my slouch! ;D It does pull back the shoulders and create a top heavy balance.
My old full pack became a packrat's nest in storage, so it was thrown out. Maybe I can borrow one with a belt to experiment with. This is encouraging. It has been so many years; it begins to come back to me. I now remember how more comforting that belt was when I traveled through the Andes with forty pounds. Shoulder and back stress affects the entire body. I use a waist belt when carrying loads even a short distance. It makes a dramatic difference. Weight is better carried and lifted using the legs, rather than the back and spine. It was no problem carrying my young son papoose style with that belted contraption. The belt will feel less naked, however.

I've been looking at 3 lb. packs, priced at $80 to $120. They come with a built in 3 liter bladder bag and tube. I figured that I'd best accumulate the cargo and then get a bag sized to it and ready for a little more. The technology has made dramatic differences since I bought my canvas Jansport in the olden times.     
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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2013, 09:37:01 AM »
Snake season will end soon enough. When they start roaming again, Iíll be getting more often into higher cooler elevations. These areas bring tall grasses depending on weather. I felt rather nervous walking through that taller grass in the less traveled trails after Romero pools, when I nearly stepped on that bullsnake. There is concern about rattlesnakes, next year.

Back in the late sixties, as more of a statement of natural fashion, I got a pair of hightop kabab moccasins. These had a nice thick layer of leather sole that curled up and formed around the foot. The calves were protected by a layer of leather with large silver buckles holding them together. They were that ilk of Cochise and Geronimo. You can see similar in photos here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geronimo

These were practical  protections when scrambling through brush.

These would protect one from rattlesnake bites. Most bites occur in the lower leg regions and feet. Iím considering making a covering, a snake gator, similar to Apaches, to go with my five toes shoes. A flap can extend over the upper foot area.

Iím looking for ideas for material to repel those needle like teeth, besides hot leather. Light weight, is best, as Iíll be into carrying this as part of an ultra-light set up.  Any creative ideas?
Jbee

P.S. I have acquired a system of 14 pounds for two without two liters of water another two Kilos. My girlfriend will have to carry her sleeping bag and pad, some food,water and warm clothes. Perhaps we will equalize the two loads a bit more. The nude part has saved much weight. It will be more hygienic to air out during the day. I have a 15oz sweatpant, a 6.4oz jacket, an 8.4 oz long sleeve t-shirt, and extra fivetoe socks. My hat, and the fivetoe shoes. There should be no reason to dress during the day and probably at not at night. The clothing is just in-case and as a sun screen to drape over our shoulders. Some might call it minimalist. :D

I've rigged the bag to be left at the camp site, in a tree. We can continue on day hikes, with water bottles in insulated strapped containers, hat, shoes and cameras. Perhaps a snack lunch and leave the rest behind.
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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2014, 09:46:27 PM »
I think that I have it about down. Anything that I might have left out (still working on light weight snake gaiters)? We will probably do a test run in a more local area when the weather makes sense. Maybe a full moon to Sabino Canyon and spend the night. Maybe an evening in the backyard.

DF has borrowed a backpack, has a sleeping bag and pad like mine (they can also zip together. Sheíll need some protective clothing like me and can carry another liter of water with the carrying bag. We can shift the weight around amongst each other.

This should make a comfortable carrying load and campÖas naturist.

Ultra Light Camping List

Clothes
Water proof wind breaker
Long sleeve t shirt
Pair of sweat pants
Socks two pair
Five toes
Light shirt for sun on shoulders
Hat with brim


Notes and calcs
Tent   4lbs
Mat     .25
Sleep Bag   3lbs.
Pack  3lbs.
Stove 3.5oz 
Fuel 100 grams approx 3.5 oz.
Pot etc. 11oz
Water filter 11oz
Water purifier           

Clothing
Jacket   6.4 oz
Long T  8.9 oz
Sweat pants 15 oz
Extra pair of socks
Vibram five finger shoes
Hat with brim

Water one liter = one kilo
Two litres = 4.4 lbs.


Plastic spoons
Styrofoam cups (for rehydrating food in boiling water and eating/drinking from)

Sponge or a wash cloth
Matches

Utility cord or parachute cord 50 ft 4oz
Duct tape- rolled onto writing pen chamber

1.8 oz emergency blanket?
Hand sanitizer 6= 1 oz.
acrylic plastic mirrors weigh .5 ounces (see resources)
tissues one packet= .6 oz.
tweezers
tooth brush
dental floss
comb

biodegradable soap in ľ or Ĺ ounce containers

pain pills
cotton balls for bandages
safety pin for repairs and blisters
gauze
small flashlight
batteries Three AAA
dryer lint
candles
large plastic garbage bag (as rain gear, or just handy)

towel 8oz
two rags 1.6 oz

camera (fresh batteries)
Tomahawk (drench, firepit and latrine digger. Rock splitter, tent pad excavator. Stake hammer. Firewood and stake creator. Sharp edge for knife. Deadly weapon. Throwing for entertainment. Rope cutter. Bushwacking tool, etc.)

Food is a pound, or so, dried.

Pertinent maps and sheet of paper
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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2014, 01:35:10 AM »
Testing the Ultra-light Gear

This warm weather we have been having just breaks all deals. We decided to try out the new ultra light gear, IN FEBRUARY! Camping in February just isnít done, but this yearÖ.

It was a spur of the moment decision. DF said that she wanted to do something that she had never done. Backpacking is something that we both left behind decades ago and Sycamore Reservoir was just discovered last week, by me. I spent Friday getting ready. Making up the dehydrated food was interesting. There had to be little true experimenting to nail it down. I tried a quick rehydrate and some herbs. I had to just speculated on the adjustments and amounts of this and that, and then pack it up. That evening, we got out the cook stove and water filtering equipment and mading sure that they worked and ran through a checklist. DF had borrowed a friendís backpack at the last minute and put together some wardrobe. We hadnít planned on doing this for a couple of more months. The upside was that although there were a few snakes reported in the fairways of the Tucson Open, there would be a light chance of encountering a rattler in the grass at this time.

We had no idea what our tolerances or capabilities would be when carrying backpacks. We wanted to take it cautiously, not taking on too much. This trail would be a 4x4 trail for 1.25 miles up hill and then down hill for two miles to the water and riparian areas. That should be a good breaking in. hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=454

I had a couple of necessities to take care of Saturday morning, so we didnít arrive at the trailhead until around 11:00am. Like a sudden storm, disappointment crashed down on us. The parking lot was full and the 4x4 road was closed. He forest service had misinformed me and an extra 2 Ĺ miles was added to the trek. No nudity and possibly too much for a first trek. We went back and forth, thinking of going someplace else. We just wanted this to be a good test. Eventually it was decided that we could try out our backpacking endurance and just see how this trail worked out. It was really too late to go someplace else. I borrowed a pair of light sweat pants from DF and we took off.

The first part of the hike was easy, as I walked angry on the track that I was to be driving on. Then, when I saw the climb to the saddle, I laughed. It was nothing. There was a guy hobbling back down bull-legged from sore body, who stopped to light a cigarette. ďIf he can, then I can.

We arrived at the saddle and were treated to a fine vista as we rested and had water. There were too many people for my taste, even a half dozen on horse back. Most people seemed to be coming up the low road. We took the high road. We saw no one that way, but we couldnít be assured enough to be nude freely or comfortably. It was downhill. Old pieces of the defunct water pipe stone foundation were seen along the trail like a series of cairns.

We arrived at the bottom where the dam was. It had been constructed for a water source for a prison camp in the thirties. The prisoners had constructed the Mt. Lemon Highway. There had also been a number of Japanese-American internment prisoners there during WWII. The Trailhead and that campsite are now named after one of the Japanese victims of government excess. It had been a two acre lake back then, but since has been filled completely with rock and sand, creating this habitat with large trees and other riparian delights. We came across a man and woman with four small children, all in florescent t-shirts at the dam. She saw our backpacks and asked where we would camp. She then described to us a campsite that they had used the night before, about a half mile further up the trail with a water source nearby. He told us that he had had a layer of ice across his water bottle that morning to greet him. There was no going back. We were locked in. This could be a cold one and a real test for the new equipment. The water was looking real ugly there at the dam, but she said that they had filtered the water near that campsite and done just fine drinking it. My feet were beginning to hurt. I didnít want to stop and then get in gear again, so we trekked on.

We soon found a tributary where two creeks converge. I recognized that the one would take us back to a place called Seven Cataracts. I have known about these pools for decades where there is skinny-dip water much of the year. They are visible from a vista lookout off of the highway (which we could see from much of the trail), but the extreme decent and climb looks dangerous and difficult. This could be the way to get to them without that risk. The trail however, continued away from there and we had to secure a source for water before anything. We continued.

We found a fire pit and evidence of use, but no water nearby. We dropped off our packs and continued up the trail to be certain that we had the correct spot. We did find some water, but it was a pretty good distance away. We went down to it by removing a dead tree that someone had placed over access. There was an old fire pit and a ridge that would shield us from view of the trail. It could be a good SN spot, but it meant setting up camp in the sand with little space for movement.

We went hiked back to our stuff. There were a couple of spots with evidence of recent activity that we saw this time, across from the campsite. We tried one. It led to sight of water in the tall grass, but no access. I found another and it led us to water. It would be difficult to use the source climbing on rocks, but doable.

There was a slight breeze, which could become colder at night, being exposed as we were, as we decided on our two choices. I walked over and saw that down in the stream bed, the vegetation was moving to the wind, too. The campsite was also visible to the trail. We realized that it seemed that most people hike to the falls and then go back. I could always throw something over me. There was probably just two or three hours of warm light leftÖwhat the heck.

Finally NAKED! We began to set up camp. He fire pit was well done and we improved upon it. This area was hit by a fire a few years back and there is evidence of it everywhere. It is strange how something is devastated right next to where something isnít burned. This site gave us a nice alligator juniper to be under and plenty of the firewood that we would need later. The new Estwing tomahawk performed wonderfully. I even chopped through some thick chunks of dried wood quickly. It dug latrines better than my camp shovel. We were hungry and the new stove did great. It is a tad difficult to judge the intensity of the flame in the daytime. The food came out wonderful. The taste of the rehydrated organic vegetables was delicious and fresh feeling. We ventured down to the creek and balanced on rocks, getting fresh filtered water that tasted wonderful at a seemly perfect temperature. We wandered around, watched the clouds turn colors as the sun set and took note of the silhouette of the balancing jagged rocks on the ridges, looking like huge mushrooms. Only one set of hikers came by.

The air quickly became cold and we donned our warm clothing. The fire kept us entertained and warm, but it soon became just a way to ward off the increasing cold. We drank hot tea, it became more just staying warm than fun. We got into the tent early because we were tired, but more to get warm. We both slept a lot of lousy. I had to get up and release that warm tea a couple of times and tested the outside temperature. The last time just before sunrise was definitely 30Fís. We had planned the equipment for 50F and possible 40Fís, but a more extreme test was certainly given. DF is looking into a better pad and Iím looking into silk long underwear. After waking to the cold together and seeing that the colors of the tent and sleeping bags resembled HoJoís (Howard Johnsonís is an iconic business with an orange and blue theme in dťcor) we went back to a sleep with more comfort.

The sound of a hummingbird buzzed the tent as we awoke. The sun had been up a while and we knew that we were now running late. We needed to get back for a 3:00pm appointment in town and shower first. The thing about this ultra light backpacking is that everything is packed tight and has its place. It has to take time to accomplish this and the hot coals had to be doused. There was no choice but to march back to the truck as quickly as we could. We did. It was probably good training for this summer. We made good time and got back nearly perfectly to sit down on the front row seats that were saved for us.

There was overcast, which was good, because we had to be dressed. We couldnít really dawdle at all anyway and be nude. There were only two sets of hikers as we broke camp and they talked so much that we got fair warning, but more as we came to the dam. We learned how easy it would be, to be over taken going up a hill by quicker day hikers with no backpacks.

We learned that next time, a warmer time, we would arrive earlier or take an extra day. This way, we could leave camp and hike nude up to the seven cataracts. This is winter there will be much more green foliage, later. This would be doable even on a weekend. We have new practical clothing strategies for the chance of an extra cold snap on top of a mountain.

The trail has been reconnoitered and now we know what and when we can get away with, to remain secretly nude. The equipment set up worked very well. A lightweight tarp might be worth the extra weight. I know now what and how much dehydrated food that we need to have along. We know that we are not ready for some of the goals for next summer, and just what we are physically up for, at this point. We know that we like it. It was very successful. Although only three hours of freerange/secret fully naked naturism was had, we now know how much that we can expand those parameters when we might return there.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2014, 06:53:16 PM »
Sounds like you had another good outing, too bad about the crowds.  I've had that happen to me before and I always am disappointed with the lack of QUIET I was hoping for.

It looks like the equipment worked out great.  Your feet hurt?  I am assuming you have hiking boots and not some sport shoe.  A pair with good arch and ankle support is a good idea especially if you are carrying a significant load.

Plenty room for you toes is almost a necessity, the last pair I had were a bit tight around my big toes.  It wasn't an issue until I started going everywhere either barefoot or wearing only sandals.  My feet started returning to their normal shape and the boots are now too tight.  I'll need another pair before I go on another backpacking trip.

Hope the trip on the real hike is as quiet and devoid of humans as you expect.

eyesup

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2014, 09:52:58 PM »
I am relying on the strength of my nature for footwear as best that I can. The load is light, enough that I'm only around 15 pounds above my medically stated best weight. It is like being overweight by that much, as far as my ankles are concerned.

 I wore Vibram Spyridon five finger shoes with a tad more cushion and tread than my KSO style fivefingers, so I don't wear out on the sharp rocky surfaces. They have a strap that wraps around my ankle giving support and better fit.

I have been studying my feet and natural flex. A good site is teamdoctorsblog with Dr. James Stoxen, D.C. to explain about this. My arch is doing well and through massage and training, my natural gate is coming back, utilizing my human-flex system more and more. Many thousands of years passed before hiking boots, so I'm finding more naturist options.

On this first ultralight trip, I discovered more of the burning between ceratin toes back into my foot. The doctor calls this progression Morton's Neuroma. It is a symptom, not a problem in itself, from wearing custom cowboy boots most of my life. Looking for solutions brought me to this study of feet, my walking system and potential for other health issues and loss of elasticity (it ain't just about gettin' old). It is all connected. I see it as another aspect of naturism, part of the barefoot experience.

The fivefinger shoes are the next best thing to barefoot and good for the toe squeeze issues according to my experience, talking with some professionals and reading. It is best to actually go barefoot on varying surfaces and run some, to train the body and feet, etc. to utilize its amazing abilities for locomotion. Instead of just using the barefoot shoes seriously and missing this body knowledge, muscle memory and muscle development gained from barefooting.

 I have been fascinated and amazed with the intricate mechanisms and far reaching effects simple adjustments in one area have on the total system as I experiment and be aware. For example, by leading with my second toes pointing, everything changed. Standing there the first time, suddenly my whole body straightened and the slouch that I have had all of my life ceased. I felt pigeonholed in the legs, however. The deep massage of my feet loosened them so that this went away, naturally! Shoes have taught our bodies to do lots of unnatural things, causing back pain and less quality while aging for so many.

So, no boots, no more.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2014, 06:51:06 PM »
I have read articles before about how much the health of your feet affects your body.  This has to do with gait, posture, muscle tone and how flexible your tendons are.

I agree that you can do this without boots.  You just have to work your way slowly till your feet are accustomed to the new world.

Good luck!

eyesup

Oh, and don't forget to keep posting those great pictures.

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2014, 05:39:01 PM »
After posting, I realized that all the pictures from 2013 and 2014 had disappeared when I transferred to the new computer that my son built me for my B-day. I'll have to spend a lot of time transferring and sorting these lost treasures from the backup hard drive, one of these days. Sorry, I was already nearly done posting when the surprise was discovered, so, no pics at this time. Jbee huddled naked (but for hat and fivefinger shoes) on the ground by a campfire, face planted next to the Earth, trying to see if the flame on the new cooker is actually still on (No wind, worked very well). Jbee straddling smooth boulders in tall grass, next to the tiny stream pond/puddle, learning to handle the new water filter, pumping, holding a bottle between his legs, while attempting to get the bob just right, WITH clothes ON! Df's help made it much easier, after she put the camera down (and we didn't slide in). Vistas of high desert mountain dormant yellow/gray grasslands with an oasis of trees. Some with dark green foliage some without. Fun rock formations on the peaks above us, as the sun begins to set, shaped like gigantic mushrooms. How're your imaginations?
Jbee 
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2014, 06:16:02 PM »
How're your imaginations?
Jbee

Actually, pretty good.

Some of those actions you described I've done, some nude, some not.  Still looking forward to the action shots though.

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