Author Topic: Ultra Light Backpacking  (Read 15352 times)

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2014, 10:00:59 PM »
Update, like clothes I am finding that I would rather travel with as few encumbrances as possible. even 14 lbs. can start to feel heavy when you are climbing uphill. So, I've been looking into shaving off more weight from my system. There are such crazies as SUL, super light weight that only burden themselves with less than 6.5 lbs. base weight (minus food and water), but there is less luxury and I notice that they tend to go from place to place goals, sometimes hotels. I just noticed how much more enjoyable a few less pounds can be after a couple of miles.
I have a very light weight tent that weighs about four pounds. I began to look into something else. A bivy sack weighs 7 oz. to a pound. An ultra light tarp about the same. The bivy that I am looking at right now is a pound, water proof and with a mesh bug screen from the shoulders up. I may even be able to eliminate my three pound sleeping bag, in some places, because it traps in heat. Experiments are in order. I'll be camping out on Mt. Lemmon this week, to try it out without the bag. I like that I can just lay it down and watch the stars, etc. while I sleep critter free.

Because of the bug screen, a covering for a surprise rain can be fashioned from a tarp, or poncho rigged up in several ways, with cord, trees and stakes. It is nice to have a shady spot, too.

I've got a pair of cotton sweat pants that weigh almost a pound. With silk underwear, I'm thinking a lightweight pair or windbreaker style pants might replace them and maybe be even warmer, when the sun goes away on a windy mountain at 8 to 10,000 ft.

My trusty old backpack is 3lbs.12 oz. I have been looking at some that are 1 1/2 to 2 lbs. These adjustments also add a couple of hundred bucks to the expenses. DF is asking, yea, but how many times will we be using these things to justify the expense over time. I'm figuring, over time, that the added pleasure and less need to train for the weight, would add to the number of trips and quality of the places that we go. Four or five lbs. is like two or three liters of water, when you want to be as naked as possible.

Here are some links to what I'm thinking about and beginning to experiment with.
borahgear.com/sidebivy.html
www.rei.com/product/79...riptionTab
www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gO_kfQixuc

Any thoughts or suggestions?
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

AndreGahs

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2014, 08:15:07 AM »
Testing the Ultra-light Gear

This warm weather we have been having just breaks all deals. We decided to try out the new ultra light gear, IN FEBRUARY! Camping in February just isnít done, but this yearÖ.

It was a spur of the moment decision. DF said that she wanted to do something that she had never done. Backpacking is something that we both left behind decades ago and Sycamore Reservoir was just discovered last week, by me. I spent Friday getting ready. Making up the dehydrated food was interesting. There had to be little true experimenting to nail it down. I tried a quick rehydrate and some herbs. I had to just speculated on the adjustments and amounts of this and that, and then pack it up. That evening, we got out the cook stove and water filtering equipment and mading sure that they worked and ran through a checklist. DF had borrowed a friendís backpack at the last minute and put together some wardrobe. We hadnít planned on doing this for a couple of more months. The upside was that although there were a few snakes reported in the fairways of the Tucson Open, there would be a light chance of encountering a rattler in the grass at this time.

We had no idea what our tolerances or capabilities would be when carrying backpacks. We wanted to take it cautiously, not taking on too much. This trail would be a 4x4 trail for 1.25 miles up hill and then down hill for two miles to the water and riparian areas. That should be a good breaking in. hikearizona.com/decoder.php?ZTN=454

I had a couple of necessities to take care of Saturday morning, so we didnít arrive at the trailhead until around 11:00am. Like a sudden storm, disappointment crashed down on us. The parking lot was full and the 4x4 road was closed. He forest service had misinformed me and an extra 2 Ĺ miles was added to the trek. No nudity and possibly too much for a first trek. We went back and forth, thinking of going someplace else. We just wanted this to be a good test. Eventually it was decided that we could try out our backpacking endurance and just see how this trail worked out. It was really too late to go someplace else. I borrowed a pair of light sweat pants from DF and we took off.

The first part of the hike was easy, as I walked angry on the track that I was to be driving on. Then, when I saw the climb to the saddle, I laughed. It was nothing. There was a guy hobbling back down bull-legged from sore body, who stopped to light a cigarette manufactured by
e cigarettes manufacturer. ďIf he can, then I can.

We arrived at the saddle and were treated to a fine vista as we rested and had water. There were too many people for my taste, even a half dozen on horse back. Most people seemed to be coming up the low road. We took the high road. We saw no one that way, but we couldnít be assured enough to be nude freely or comfortably. It was downhill. Old pieces of the defunct water pipe stone foundation were seen along the trail like a series of cairns.

We arrived at the bottom where the dam was. It had been constructed for a water source for a prison camp in the thirties. The prisoners had constructed the Mt. Lemon Highway. There had also been a number of Japanese-American internment prisoners there during WWII. The Trailhead and that campsite are now named after one of the Japanese victims of government excess. It had been a two acre lake back then, but since has been filled completely with rock and sand, creating this habitat with large trees and other riparian delights. We came across a man and woman with four small children, all in florescent t-shirts at the dam. She saw our backpacks and asked where we would camp. She then described to us a campsite that they had used the night before, about a half mile further up the trail with a water source nearby. He told us that he had had a layer of ice across his water bottle that morning to greet him. There was no going back. We were locked in. This could be a cold one and a real test for the new equipment. The water was looking real ugly there at the dam, but she said that they had filtered the water near that campsite and done just fine drinking it. My feet were beginning to hurt. I didnít want to stop and then get in gear again, so we trekked on.

We soon found a tributary where two creeks converge. I recognized that the one would take us back to a place called Seven Cataracts. I have known about these pools for decades where there is skinny-dip water much of the year. They are visible from a vista lookout off of the highway (which we could see from much of the trail), but the extreme decent and climb looks dangerous and difficult. This could be the way to get to them without that risk. The trail however, continued away from there and we had to secure a source for water before anything. We continued.

We found a fire pit and evidence of use, but no water nearby. We dropped off our packs and continued up the trail to be certain that we had the correct spot. We did find some water, but it was a pretty good distance away. We went down to it by removing a dead tree that someone had placed over access. There was an old fire pit and a ridge that would shield us from view of the trail. It could be a good SN spot, but it meant setting up camp in the sand with little space for movement.

We went hiked back to our stuff. There were a couple of spots with evidence of recent activity that we saw this time, across from the campsite. We tried one. It led to sight of water in the tall grass, but no access. I found another and it led us to water. It would be difficult to use the source climbing on rocks, but doable.

There was a slight breeze, which could become colder at night, being exposed as we were, as we decided on our two choices. I walked over and saw that down in the stream bed, the vegetation was moving to the wind, too. The campsite was also visible to the trail. We realized that it seemed that most people hike to the falls and then go back. I could always throw something over me. There was probably just two or three hours of warm light leftÖwhat the heck.

Finally NAKED! We began to set up camp. He fire pit was well done and we improved upon it. This area was hit by a fire a few years back and there is evidence of it everywhere. It is strange how something is devastated right next to where something isnít burned. This site gave us a nice alligator juniper to be under and plenty of the firewood that we would need later. The new Estwing tomahawk performed wonderfully. I even chopped through some thick chunks of dried wood quickly. It dug latrines better than my camp shovel. We were hungry and the new stove did great. It is a tad difficult to judge the intensity of the flame in the daytime. The food came out wonderful. The taste of the rehydrated organic vegetables was delicious and fresh feeling. We ventured down to the creek and balanced on rocks, getting fresh filtered water that tasted wonderful at a seemly perfect temperature. We wandered around, watched the clouds turn colors as the sun set and took note of the silhouette of the balancing jagged rocks on the ridges, looking like huge mushrooms. Only one set of hikers came by.

The air quickly became cold and we donned our warm clothing. The fire kept us entertained and warm, but it soon became just a way to ward off the increasing cold. We drank hot tea, it became more just staying warm than fun. We got into the tent early because we were tired, but more to get warm. We both slept a lot of lousy. I had to get up and release that warm tea a couple of times and tested the outside temperature. The last time just before sunrise was definitely 30Fís. We had planned the equipment for 50F and possible 40Fís, but a more extreme test was certainly given. DF is looking into a better pad and Iím looking into silk long underwear. After waking to the cold together and seeing that the colors of the tent and sleeping bags resembled HoJoís (Howard Johnsonís is an iconic business with an orange and blue theme in dťcor) we went back to a sleep with more comfort.

The sound of a hummingbird buzzed the tent as we awoke. The sun had been up a while and we knew that we were now running late. We needed to get back for a 3:00pm appointment in town and shower first. The thing about this ultra light backpacking is that everything is packed tight and has its place. It has to take time to accomplish this and the hot coals had to be doused. There was no choice but to march back to the truck as quickly as we could. We did. It was probably good training for this summer. We made good time and got back nearly perfectly to sit down on the front row seats that were saved for us.

There was overcast, which was good, because we had to be dressed. We couldnít really dawdle at all anyway and be nude. There were only two sets of hikers as we broke camp and they talked so much that we got fair warning, but more as we came to the dam. We learned how easy it would be, to be over taken going up a hill by quicker day hikers with no backpacks.

We learned that next time, a warmer time, we would arrive earlier or take an extra day. This way, we could leave camp and hike nude up to the seven cataracts. This is winter there will be much more green foliage, later. This would be doable even on a weekend. We have new practical clothing strategies for the chance of an extra cold snap on top of a mountain.

The trail has been reconnoitered and now we know what and when we can get away with, to remain secretly nude. The equipment set up worked very well. A lightweight tarp might be worth the extra weight. I know now what and how much dehydrated food that we need to have along. We know that we are not ready for some of the goals for next summer, and just what we are physically up for, at this point. We know that we like it. It was very successful. Although only three hours of freerange/secret fully naked naturism was had, we now know how much that we can expand those parameters when we might return there.
Jbee

Well it seems you had lots of fun..We are planning to join similar camp in coming weeks and hope for lots of fun..
« Last Edit: July 29, 2014, 09:51:49 AM by AndreGahs »

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2014, 08:44:29 AM »
Update in the evolution as research and experience hone my load. My four pound tent has been replaced by the bivys, but we needed a cover for the possible rain and frequent lack of shade. We are constructing a 9 to 12 oz. tarp (9x9 foot, 3x3 meters) that can be set up in multiple shelter arrangements depending on storm conditions, simple downpour, or sun. I found ground cloths less than an oz. each, that can be modified into also serving as rain ponchos. Found a deal on 8 titanium tent stakes that weight less than an oz. together, instead of an oz. each. The little stuff mounts up and weight goes down. The tarp can be set as an equilateral triangle with a suspension of the top from the center quickly for hard storms. It can also be ďAĒ framed or opened to a 3 meter square shady area or light rain.
We liked the less than two pound backpacks and bought them.

We have two three pound sleeping bags. In the future, we may replace them with a custom double quilt at one pound plus. The weight can be divided between us as the two person version splits apart. The bivys could be switched for a 19oz. net tent that would keep critters out. We'll see how that goes in time. Eliminating this other five pounds between us would be dramatic, AND we could keep each other warm at night! That would be another $700 to $1000 bucks, or a kit, or DIY around $150. We'll see after that tarp project. The expense could be ridiculous to the usage, or reasonable.

The idea is that the lighter the weight, the ease of carrying the load, the more pleasure and mobility. The more pleasure, the more we are apt to use it. The more ease, the less daunting physical work, the greater ease to get ourselves out there. The more we are out there, the more our physical abilities to get out there improve, the more improvement physically, and the cycle moves on. The more out there the more freedom of naturism.

These different pieces of equipment that are collected actually can be more adaptive to varying situations. Different weather, kayaking in lakes, or rivers, backpacking, car camping, day hiking, and doing these things alone or with DF, all are best done with varying equipment. The proper tool for the proper job.
I'm having fun figuring this out and prepping.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2014, 07:06:18 AM »
So, the six pounds of sleeping bag could be reduced to a pound to a pound and a half each (2 or 3 ibs) by splitting a backpacking quilt.

 Has anyone had any experience with these?

I've found DIY kit for $100 to $120, instead of $550. http://www.rayjardine.com/ray-way/Quilt-Kit/index.htm
Eliminating the weight of two liters of water is significant.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2015, 08:08:09 AM »
Iíve been investing in a lighter load for backpacking. The idea is to minimize weight and make use of various configurations of equipment in multiple scenarios, like DF and me together, me solo or with another hiker, overnight or multiple days. Also, rain, or the many Arizona days, when it certainly wonít rain.

We built a tarp tent (one pound 2oz. and 9íx10í)). I bought titanium shepherd stakes, but found that they donít really hold in a wind. I had to invest in some meatier aluminum stakes that will stick even in sand on a beach (useful in a kayak trip or a Mexican beach), but they weigh 6 oz. more. This tarp also will shape into many configurations. I can quickly create a pyramid. I got a tent pole for this that weighs only 1.4 oz. This will be good when solo and a storm is coming. I can set up with my bivy in it in a couple of minutes. It also sets up as an A frame more traditional tent (rain), or as a lean-to for use with two people (shade or wind screen). For a poundís weight, we can sleep under the tarp draped in a cozy net tent with no critters. This net tent can also be used without the tarp, just laying watching the stars.

DF didnít like the separate bivy set up and it is warmer to sleep together, and then the obvious romantic and friendly benefits. This week, I ordered a custom camping quilt for us. As is, we have two zip together sleeping bags and a wool blanket all weighing over 7 pounds. This water resistant down quilt will be much warmer than the cheap bags, it can be set up more open in warm weather, but the great thing is that it only weighs a pound and a quarter. I ordered a neat camo w/ extra goodness setup, Iím excited, but it will be a long 4 or 5 weeks for it to be made and shipped. Naked luxury out on the trailÖ.

We can now travel splitting the load, including food, at under 10 lbs. each. Then add what we need for water.

I can solo at less than 10 pounds plus water. I also can do a single stripped down minimalist version of this solo arrangement, cutting out cooking equipment. In certain circumstances, with this quilt on a summer desert day and warm night and a water source, I could be less than 8 pounds. I could eliminate most of the clothing that I pack for warmth at night and drop more than a pound from that. Getting down to less comfort (other than being naked) might be fun in itself, just to do along the Verde River. There are a few shade trees and enough water to wade into to cool off. I need food, water filter, bivy for critters, quilt, odds and ends. My tomahawk can be replaced with a snow tent stake that digs latrines and fire pits. Small dry twigs can be a fun and a warm fire.  There is that super ultralight (SUL) group. They pull the covers off of match books to drop weight, but I donít hear of them getting naked. They just wear the clothes all day and all night. If I wore my pants and shirt, Iíd be carrying similar to them, but I add that weight to my pack load instead. Iím practical, not competitive, soÖ.

Anyway, itís light weight and versatile with options of more luxury or less. It should adapt to desert heat all the way to mountain cold.
Jbee
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Karla

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2015, 10:01:37 AM »
Oh I remember writing out and counting up the weight of all the different items in my gear. And then I packed some really heavy metal Hasselblad equipment, but if the camping gear was heavy as well the pack would have been even heavier.

I am wondering if I should invest in a new digital camera though and leave the Hasselblad behind on trips where weight really is an issue. It's manual focus and with my eye sight it's becoming more difficult to focus it properly. What's the point of being able to take pictures in medium form if it's blurry? Maybe not for all trips, just the ones where I really need to cut back. Or maybe I should really cut down on weight even more and enjoy the day more?

I've been wanting to do multi-day camping trips for a while now but haven't actually wild camped for more than a night. The weight really seems to pile up when you need to be out for longer, mainly because of all the cookware and food etc. We still haven't bought a dehydrator yet.



jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2015, 11:48:59 PM »
The digital cameras that don't have those clumsy and hard to see with the sun screens are becoming harder to find. I just don't understand why these replace putting my camera to my eye, pointing and securing it tight with my arms tucked into my body, or resting on something. My one small digital sure does most of what I used to do with my Nikormat and a bag full of lenses and other toys.

The cooking system that I use now weighs 11oz. I just boil water with it to rehydrate foods and make teas. I'm looking into eliminating the 11oz., taking a plastic jar instead for overnights. For example, I've dehydrated re-fried beans with a nice layer of spicy hummus on top, this couples with dehydrated apple slices to dip and is delicious. All it requires is to be set into the container with water. It re-hydrates and is filling and warm enough, when left hanging on the back of a pack in the sun. Eleven ounces of the right kind of food can go a long way during an overnight. We usually take a pound or so dehydrated for two meals, a breakfast and snacks, so I'm working on this weight elimination at times. This mixture can be eaten with drinking water, also. I have discovered organic blueberry snacks with chia seeds and many highly nutritious other foods in it. Still, any longer stays out there, I would enjoy a warm breakfast, that hot tea, or a good thick stew at the end of a day. The idea is to enjoy oneself and certain luxuries augment my experience.

When I get to experimenting with the new quilt, I may discover that I can use it bundled up around the camp's fire to stay warm at night, until sleep. The temperatures change around 30F degrees anywhere in Arizona each day, but if I can eliminate most or all of the clothing weight during an overnight, there is a significant difference. This totally nude hiking may very well work on the warmer evenings on the trails. The idea of taking off in the wilderness without clothing is intriguing in itself, but what if it were practical, too?
Jbee
« Last Edit: February 10, 2015, 11:52:43 PM by jbeegoode »
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eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2015, 08:18:56 PM »
Intentionally leaving with no clothes at all, if weather permits, for an entire trip naked does sound great.

I spent a couple hours once hiking after caching my clothes and had nothing to use for cover if I bumped into anyone.  It was a new and wonderful experience.  On a longer trip though, especially down in southern AZ, I would think that the only concession to make might be a poncho.

If your bivy tent is easily accessible you could probably use that as a poncho.  Warm rain is nice but eventually you will get chilled from the water.

Paring down your pack to a minimalist load would help to increase the sensation of being without clothes.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2015, 12:11:45 AM »
Intentionally leaving with no clothes at all, if weather permits, for an entire trip naked does sound great.

I spent a couple hours once hiking after caching my clothes and had nothing to use for cover if I bumped into anyone.  It was a new and wonderful experience.  On a longer trip though, especially down in southern AZ, I would think that the only concession to make might be a poncho.

If your bivy tent is easily accessible you could probably use that as a poncho.  Warm rain is nice but eventually you will get chilled from the water.

Paring down your pack to a minimalist load would help to increase the sensation of being without clothes.

Duane
My drop cloth is an emergency pancho. It is a clear plastic weighing 1.5 oz. as I remember, plus duck tape to tack it together and prevent tears and a sandwich ziplock to keep it in.

I'm looking to get a camouflage kilt or wrap with a velcro closing waist to protect shoulders from sun and pack-strap wear, hide the blue backpack while leaving camp for day hikes, sit on, something to put on if necessary, wet towel to keep cool. I haven't found one that fits at the right price, yet.
Jbee   
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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2015, 10:44:49 PM »
I have tried out a Camoflage kilt. It works, but better than that, a sarong is cover enough and weighs much less. It can also be a bottom sheet, sit-down towel, shoulder cushion, shoulder sunscreen, quick cover-up and is versatile in many ways. In a green or camo color, it hides a campsite or stashed equipment.

When it is cold at night, I replaced my heavy seat pants with a 3.6 oz. windbreak pants that fit into my fist, which can be coupled with a pair of silk long underwear, or even colder a layer of thermal underwear. If that and a fire don't work, the day was too cold to be out nude. There is also that new camping quilt, which is excellent, cozy, wonderful, especially when shared wit my partner. I have a windbreaker and long sleeve T-shirt for the upper, a wool hat and thick wool socks. Little space and weight (21oz.).

I've been using that camoflage kilt in cold weather. It works well, if my torso is kept warm. I thought that my legs and bum would be a problem, but it works. Depending on the weather, it is a better alternative to nude than pants are. The heat of a campfire climbs up the kilt and gets trapped where it is most important. I didn't realize what the females had going for them!

Solo austere overnight, nice weather, I am set at around 6 1/2 pounds, add water and less than a half pound food. With DF in relative luxury for days, less than 10 pounds each. 

I dropped a half a pound by purchasing (for less expense) one of the new Sawyer water filters, around 3oz.
Jbee

 
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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2015, 07:37:46 PM »
I did some experimenting with my clothing choices. The temperatures in this mountain paradise at close to 10,000 feet, were highs in the high sixties F, a good temp range when nude. When the sun went down, they dropped into the forties F. By morning, The gauge told me 34F to 38F.

We were testing the Enlightened 30F degree custom camping quilt in this colder weather, with two new Klymat pads under us. I had an array of clothing.

We began to experiment with ultra-light clothing options next to the fire. Nudity was in the mix for a while. The net tent in 30F degree nighttime temps would come later. I tried silk long underwear, a layer of Fruit of the Loom thermal long johns that my son had given me, and a new pair of expensive windbreaker pants. I figured that the heat would be kept in and the first layers would wick the moister from the body.

On top I wore the long-sleeved cotton T-shirt, a sleeveless sweat shirt for my torso and a windbreaker, anticipating the same strategy. An ancient alpaca wool cap form Bolivia would keep my heat loss during the night. It worked in Bolivia. I still felt cold by the fire, with my Vibram Five finger shoes added to the ensemble with a pair of regular socks and a pair of wickers.

We were up talking and playing with a log that was burning very slowly, when we discovered that it was midnight. I had the net tent with the tarp draped from ground to tree as a lean to. We would be very open. We would be covered only by the Enlightened down camping quilt. Shoes off, I placed thick grey socks over my day use toe socks.

We had to learn how not to fall into the gap between our mats. My feet never got warm enough, and although the quilt did its job, I felt a bit of chill in the wind sealed clothing. That old hat must have fallen off over half a dozen times. But, the stars through the trees were wonderful as we spooned through the night.

The next night, we went through the patience of another thicker log burning on the fire, wondering just what kind of hardwood that it was. Fires are so entertaining.  This evening, I thought to try a different combination of clothing, I had been comfortable in just the sweat jacket and T-shirt. I wondered if the lack of breathability had caused my discomfort the night before. Tonight, just the hooded sweat jacket and T. The hoody would keep my hat from falling off. The silk pants and thermo-pants would be my bottom. DF had heating packets for my thick socks, only at bedtime (at fireside, I wore the fivetoe VFF configuration as before.

I had not been cold and I was very comfortable through the night. The conclusions are that the wind gear did trap in the body heat, but it also trapped the moister, which became cold. The clothing needs to breath like skin. The camping quilt works wonderfully, and those packets got my feet warm after being chilled the night before. I just need the dry thick sock. The sweat-shirt hoody weights more to pack, however. What I take will depend on the weather conditions for an overnight. Longer stays, Iíll have to be more versatile, carrying more, do to unpredictability.

I need to try, the windbreaker pants without an under layer and with the silk unders only in both humid and dry air. The pants also can be tied at the cuffs or left to allow air. I figure that I may be doing something wrong. They were highly recommended and I like that they weigh only 2.6 ounces. I slept comfortably with no pants, only a T-shirt and sweat jacket in the SUV the first night under the quilt. When I got up at 34F, to walk around, I was good.

I bought cotton light military material camouflage kilt with the traditional designs and Velcro waist. It is a handy quick wrap. It is a bit hot, still better than pants, on warm days. As a shoulder wrap it fails on any hot day. There is no substitute for nudity and a light weight piece, like my sarong, works better on the shoulders. If I had to wear clothes, hiking on the trail, Iíd prefer it to a constricting more delicate sarong, although the sarong has an extra purpose of being a ground sheet, a mattress cover, a sun umbrella, at times. I canít see my footing as well with the kilt compared to nudeÖthere is no substitute for naked.

Any suggestions here on thermal insulation, condensation, humidity factors, moister barriers, etc.? We are heading up to Mt. Lemmon at 9200 ft. and there is a 50% chance of rain forecast, which should mean some humidity.
Jbee
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nudewalker

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2015, 04:05:03 PM »
May I suggest you visit the Stephenson's Warmlite site.
http://warmlite.com/
If you look on the left hand side you will find a commentary on vapor barriers and breathable fabrics. If I were to get serious about backpacking there would be an investment in their equipment but at this time there is no justification for that expense. Also the owners are naturists so in their catalogue they are often depicted using the products nude to prove their point. It may be too heavy for your purposes Jbee but the theory is there.

Sorry, click the header "Our story" to get to the left sided menu.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 04:07:08 PM by nudewalker »
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jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #27 on: June 24, 2015, 07:28:58 PM »
Thank-you. That was a slow read for me. I had to relate my experience to swallow it. I'm used to getting clammy with any kind of vapor barrier. I'm going up into a cold humid area this weekend. I'll use this info to restructure my layers and experiment. This sure does explain the moister in my bivy sack.

Those expensive ultralight windbreaker pants may be key. There was a review from a guy who had just worn a pair of those in Colorado for twp years. It may be the vapor barrier concept that allowed that. I have much more reading to do, before the weekend, gotta find out how those thin silk pants work so well.
Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2015, 12:23:04 AM »
Moisture in a sleeping bag can be a bad thing in a cold environment. In a hot one, it's just an inconvenience.

That's why some bags have that hood for covering your head, to stay warm,  and yet allows the vapor from exhaling your breath to not collect in the bag.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #29 on: June 25, 2015, 01:28:35 AM »
I'm thoroughly sold on that camping quilt. I caught DF covering her face in it next to me the other night in high 30F's, breathing down into our nest. A quick flip and the air is no longer trapped. The air doesn't trap like conventional stuff anyway. I can feel the heat rising by the moment, whenever I climb into/under it. It doesn't get wet. So I pulled the cord in the middle, between us, that snugs it around our necks and hooked my finger into it, helping to trap most of the fresh air. We woke up feeling very well to a 280degree view of big trees and babbling brook.

I still haven't tried it bundled up inside my bivy. I'll be out doing a solo, or an overnight with my son in the next couple of months for the test.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.