Author Topic: People who've given up washing  (Read 235 times)

Bob Knows

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Re: People who've given up washing
« Reply #30 on: August 17, 2019, 12:45:48 AM »
Speaking of military sleeping bags. Those old tents and denim covered metal canteens, all had that particular smell about them. New, or old. What was that? Mold? Materials?
Jbee

I think the old WWII surplus canvas materials had a particular smell because of some kind of preservative used during the war. It kept the cotton canvas from rotting in the jungles but had a chemical odor.   
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jbeegoode

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Re: People who've given up washing
« Reply #31 on: August 17, 2019, 04:13:03 AM »
 I can still remember that smell, from when I was a kid. It brings fond memories.
Jbee
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BlueTrain

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Re: People who've given up washing
« Reply #32 on: August 17, 2019, 12:31:08 PM »
When I go into a surplus store (which are becoming scarce around here), I always say it smells like my basement. Likewise, when I go into a garage or service station, there is also a distinctive odor, mostly of grease, I suppose.

Odors or aromas, are interesting. There can be certain smells that will trigger the memory, for better or worse. And it is interesting how the memory of them can linger for so long. There are a lot of strong odors or aromas that are not that unpleasant, although some may not care for them. There is leather, tobacco (but not tobacco smoke), freshly cut grass and freshly cut wood, wood smoke, fresh paint, ground coffee and all sorts of cooking and baking odors. But a walk through the woods can reveal unpleasant odors, like rotting vegetation and other dead things. But even the smell of a creek can trigger pleasant memories of camping trips, too.

The family owned a beach cottage for several decades, up until three or four years ago. It sat empty for most of the year (which is ultimately why it was sold) and when you first went inside, there was the strong aroma of juniper, which the front rooms were paneled with. But you stopped noticing it in ten minutes. Then you started noticing the salt air.

jbeegoode

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Re: People who've given up washing
« Reply #33 on: August 18, 2019, 05:28:04 PM »
Yup, olfactory is amazing. When I was sleeping up on Mt. Lemon this week, I noticed the smell of something. I was waiting to place it. It wasn't a bear, I somehow know a bear's scent. It dawned to me that it was a close skunk. I have never been that close to a skunk, but a de-scented pet. I certainly know the dead skunk in the middle of the road smell. But, I knew that this was similar enough to that and toned way down. I had an no clear idea how close it was as I lay in my net tent. Rustling confirmed my sense of direction and distance. Maybe, I heard it subtly, maybe not. But, I knew that it was a skunk.

Incidentally, I made some sleeping bag rustling sounds and mumbled talked to myself, nothing too threatening and it left...and covered my head and prayed.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.