Author Topic: The Art of Free Range Naturism  (Read 26258 times)

JOhnGw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 695
  • Almost anything worth doing is better done naked.
    • View Profile
The Art of Free Range Naturism
« on: August 14, 2015, 09:01:32 AM »
I am starting this topic as a place where everybody's tips, hints and techniques can be shared.
Please will SNS refugees forgo our usual tendency to topic wander here so that it becomes a really useful resource for beginners in the art.
With a bit of luck Stuart and Karla will find it suitable for pinning.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2015, 10:18:04 PM by JOhnGw »
JOhn

Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same.
George Bernard Shaw, Maxims for Revolutionaries

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3281
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Rang Naturism
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2015, 08:31:42 PM »
It would be nice in an organizational sense to keep these tips here, but I have a navigation problem, as things keep going so fast. For instance, Larry is writing about stealth on a sandbar and I responded with the use a raft to cover with trick's intricacies, both good craft tips. I then saw this too late and the spontaneous other spot got lost. Then I thought that the solution would be to link to the crafty posts from here. So, when I tried to get back to the thread, I couldn't find it, as we are so mislabeled and drifted. Perhaps it will turn up in replies later.

Point is, when there is a good craft tip, we can remember to link to it from here, rather than double post, or to draw away from another conversation. This thread is a good idea.

On my website, I try to place a craft lesson into each trip report, That way, people can learn as we have, a bit here and there during adventures. What works in one context may be risky in another situation...live and learn.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3281
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Rang Naturism
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2015, 08:34:55 PM »
Carnuding when running errands tips of the craft are found on this page: http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=679.0

Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3281
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Rang Naturism
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2015, 10:14:05 PM »
All students hereby arise in puris naturalibus secretum.

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

tanman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2015, 04:10:40 PM »
Quote from: Jbee
... Larry is writing about stealth on a sandbar ...

That would be here on the 'Walk in the desert!' thread, of course:  http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=627.msg2101#msg2101

Quote from: Jbee
... I responded with the use a raft to cover with trick's intricacies ...

That would be here:   http://freerangenaturism.com/forum/index.php?topic=627.msg2123#msg2123

Have fun with the CRAFT, naked!
Larry (tanman in Texas)

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3281
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2015, 07:30:04 PM »
Vehicles, tents, lawn chairs, strategically arranged using adjacent natural brush and tree visual screens can make for private CO areas ...

Many small rivers and shorelines have steep banks/berms, below which one can easily be concealed while naked in the sun ...


http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/08/17/a-memorable-week/
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2318
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2015, 11:15:23 PM »
I am going to assume that anyone reading this already knows the basics about hiking. What gear to have what supplies, etc.  The 10 essentials and all that can be found on any legitimate hiking website.

I suppose we should clarify each tip with whether it is for those more intrepid and just don't worry about whether they are seen, or are like me and would just rather not see anyone. Sometimes when I am out I care less than other times. It varies. Usually I would rather not bump into anyone and have to deal with that.

Since I live in a desert my tips are unique for that, such as remaining motionless when I see someone, where my coloring allows me to sort of blend in to the background, especially at a distance. Even someone without a tan would be hard to spot as long as they aren't wearing anything bright (hats, backpacks, etc) and aren't moving.

When I have walked away from my clothes, still carrying my gear but caching my clothes so I am completely naked with no cover, I pick a spot inconspicuous and off the trail. I also try to make sure to leave no marks wherever I have put them. I suppose that is a bit paranoid.

I also choose sites during the week when it is less busy and those that are less traveled.

More as I think of them.

Duane

Peter S

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 445
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2015, 03:39:27 PM »
Quote
Even someone without a tan would be hard to spot as long as they aren't wearing anything bright (hats, backpacks, etc) and aren't moving.

In the '60s and '70s SAS apparently painted their desert-going Land Rovers pink, as it was discovered this worked as very good camouflage, particularly around dawn and dusk. The long wheelbase Land Rovers became known as the Pink Panthers, as the Peter Sellers films of that name were popular at the time

peter
____________________________________
Motorcycling, history, country hiking,
naked living

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2318
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2015, 04:54:42 PM »
I have a friend that is a helicopter pilot and works for a emergency airlift company. He once flew search and rescue missions. When we were still in Scouts and discussing how to ensure a rescue group could spot us if we needed, it I asked him what was the best color to do so.

When flying at altitude and looking for something that shouldn't be there, fluorescent pink was the color as I recall. He said most other colors can be found in nature in some form. But not that one.

Duane

Davie

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 283
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2015, 02:56:01 PM »
How times have changed. I have some walking guide books by W H Poucher. (still the best guides for Snowdonia and the Lake District). His recommendation was red socks as they could be seen at a distance.

Davie  8)

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2318
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2015, 06:05:25 PM »
Correct me if I'm mistaken, isn't the 'Lake District' north, up close to Scotland.

I've never been there, hope to correct that someday, but photos I've seen show a cold and subdued landscape without much color (of the plant type). It may be that red is the best color for that area.

Here in the Mojave Desert there are an amazing number of bright colors of flowers. Granted, they don't survive long, but if you Google or 'Library' desert succulents or cactus, you will see red, magenta, purple, white and yellows all displaying many different shades of each color. You need something that stands out as 'not normal'.

Duane

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1419
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2015, 11:57:10 PM »
Quote from: eyesup
I am going to assume that anyone reading this already knows the basics about hiking. What gear to have what supplies, etc.  The 10 essentials and all that can be found on any legitimate hiking website.

To assume makes...etc!  No, Duane you can't assume that.  What are the 10 essentials?  Any website recommendations to look at for the rest of it?

John

HairlessNude

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 26
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2015, 06:23:33 PM »
I was always taught that the color blue was the only color you won't find naturally in the woods. The only thing wrong about that around here, is tom turkey's can have blue heads.

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3281
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2015, 08:02:06 PM »
I wonder how many tom turkeys are getting rescued by mistake in a given year? :D

Those emergency bivy sacks and space blankets are a florescent orange and stand out pretty good, depending. They are large to be seen. That is if you are day hiking and have trouble. They weight little, are folded small, only 12 or 15 bucks at REI. 

I carry a mirror. It is small, this one weighs like an ounce, and made less destructible, less than four bucks. I have it placed in a Ziploc baggie to protect it's surface, because it serves other duties, as well. Just gotta make sure I don't blind the helicopter pilot and lay out two of us, or get buried in the pile.  ;D There used to be a smuggler's plane wreck up on the hillside. The refection could be seen for miles.

The eyes respond to movement. One of the 10 necessities that DF was reading to me going up to the mountains last week was a whistle. I never carry one. I suppose that I can scream in agony, pretty good...naturally. Whistles are for the birds.

I carry a snow tent stake for digging and for a weapon.
A small roll of TP
A hand/butt wipe pad, or two
A pair of tweezers
Plenty of water, at least two liters, unless there will be a water source and I take a filter.
 That's my five necessities. If I was out alone in more extreme tooleys, I'd take duct tape and an emergency bivy.

For longer days, I take plenty of lightweight snacks/a lunch focusing on protein and nutrition. Dehydrated re-fried black beans with hummus, dehydrated apple slices. Those date, blueberry, chia, superfood health things are very good, energy and filling. A bag of almonds and cashews, and carrots hold up well. And of course my favorite Cliff Bar. I have been carrying a sarong, for sun exposure, clothing, and sit down, if necessary and when not in use, it cushions my shoulder under the bag strap. I wear a sun hat and footwear appropriate to conditions.

For shorter hikes, like out back in my Tortolitas, a water bottle and camera are good enough. Tweezers and car keys may end up in the camera bag.

I have a small gorilla pod that I have yet to use and I nearly always carry a camera for the necessary trip reports!

The ten essentials in detail: http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ten-essentials.html

If I had a wood out my door, I'd be enjoying the Hairless plan, nada. I did a short one in the forest, one morning last week and loved it.

Jbee
« Last Edit: August 28, 2015, 08:05:17 PM by jbeegoode »
Barefoot all over, all over.

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1419
    • View Profile
Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2015, 12:30:02 AM »
Quote
I was always taught that the color blue was the only color you won't find naturally in the woods
In April, in our local woods, almost the entire woodland floor is a mass of bluebells.  I can't think of anything else that's particularly blue in the woods but the bluebells are certainly an exception to that rule!

Thanks for the 10 lists Jbee, all very logical!

John