Author Topic: Bare Feet  (Read 24260 times)

nudewalker

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #30 on: November 10, 2015, 03:51:47 PM »
Kayaker, what are the footies? Can you give us links? I looked around and found Darkfin split toe booties. Are these them?
Jbee

Yes please! As much as I have conditioned myself to be barefoot there are those places (the old railroad bed comes to mind) where it is too hot, rough or uncomfortable to be barefoot. And since I've been using my kayak to find more out of the way places a foot covering that is non slip would be a plus!
"Always do what you are afraid to do"-Emerson

Bob Knows

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2015, 05:51:31 PM »

Yes please! As much as I have conditioned myself to be barefoot there are those places (the old railroad bed comes to mind) where it is too hot, rough or uncomfortable to be barefoot. And since I've been using my kayak to find more out of the way places a foot covering that is non slip would be a plus!


Yep.  Bare human feet are 100% natural, but the crushed rock of a railroad bed is not natural at all.  There are very few natural places that human feet are not better than shoes.

The dirt on my driveway sometimes gets pretty hot on a June (high sun angle) afternoon, but again that's an unnatural construct for vehicle traffic.  The surrounding wild area is easier on feet. I still have my huaraches if needed for crushed rock gravel but I hate wearing them. 
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
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jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2015, 11:54:54 PM »
I published a rap about Bare feet at the website: It is part number FIVE:
http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/11/10/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-six/

I titled it, "Personal Anecdotal Observations." It covers blind barefooting, manmade surfaces like Bob is getting at in the last post (Those Wonderful Smooth Hard Concrete Walkways), and a warning about the time I shredded  my feet and how one might avoid that.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #33 on: November 15, 2015, 09:36:25 PM »
I posted part six of the series. It's a short history of shoes with practical applications. It is titled "All of This Thing about Shoes is Relatively Recent History" with evidence toward that argument about shoes being an improvement.
It is meant to be encouragement to a novice, or anti-bare.

I think the next will go over making barefoot shoes suggestions. The next week, a list of resources and links should wrap up the series.

This injured bare foot is clearing up slowly. This week I got a flu, so I was distracted from it and just laid about, tapping keyboards and exploring with a mouse. I hadn't been sick in years, probably the imbalance that I physically feel since the regime of antibiotics I was given. When it rains it pours and I figure that this should all pass. All of this is directly related to the beginning, the cholla needle in the nerve of my barefoot. I'm the best argument for not going barefoot...and a good embarrassment to AMA/FDA medical science.

The best archaeological evidence available, shows us that for 10,000 plus years, people around here wore nothing but grass, reed (I suspect corn) weave sandals and jewelry. That's all that has been found. They had fires at the entrances of their dome huts and the sun to keep warm. Nothing else was discovered. They did trade and interact with others in the vast region, clear to the gulf of California. There were those there who used huaraches. Locally they developed a network of unity and warning system clear across the valley like a wagon wheel and hub. They had irrigated farming networks, ball courts and had intimate knowledge of the lands and uses. Excavation has been done, but no clothing, or none survived. They probably wasted little. Perhaps they burned the last remnants of bags,blankets, or coverings in cold? There is nearly always a warm sunny part of the day to be naked. All that is needed is shelter with fire during the night. Blankets of what, I don't know?  Leather of course, there was plenty of deer in the forests along the rivers.

If you are living in the village, you don't need shoes. In the forest, you don't need shoes. Running across the desert, shoes make sense. Now, I doubt that they allowed cholla in their villages and habitations, like I do.
Jbee
« Last Edit: November 15, 2015, 09:49:09 PM by jbeegoode »
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #34 on: December 24, 2015, 08:34:11 PM »
I just posted Barefoot all over, all over: Part EIGHT at TheFreeRangeNaturist.org (TFRN ?).
It is a list of resources recommended. There should be a wealth of conversation stimulation there.

http://thefreerangenaturist.org/2015/12/24/barefoot-all-over-all-over-part-eight/

The videos are hilarious in the least.
Jbee 
Barefoot all over, all over.

reubenT

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #35 on: December 28, 2015, 08:25:15 PM »
I have thought how easy it seemed to go barefoot all the time as a kid,  in the 70's,  and wondered why it seems so much harder now.   For one thing I wear shoes/boots for work protection,  spend very little time walking barefoot because most of my time is spent working.  So I never really get conditioned to it anymore.     And I just realized that I do weigh quite a bit more now than then.  Probably putting a lot more psi ground pressure on my feet than I used to.    Just grew up, went to work and gained a lot of weight in muscle mass. 

Bob Knows

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2015, 11:25:17 PM »
Yes its hard for feet to be in shape when they are forced to be abused all day at work. 

Today I took my snow boots off at the grocery store and put them on my cart while shopping.  Its about 20F outside (-6C) so I wore the snow boots outside.   I go barefoot to drive and outside for short distances even in cold.



Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

MartinM

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2016, 08:51:09 AM »
I wear boots when I go ski-ing locally, but I only put them on these days when I put my skis on.  If there is a bit of a walk until there is sufficient snow, then I do it barefoot, and I almost always take them off on the way back at the same time as my skis so my feet can enjoy the experience of walking free in the last of the snow. There is an additonal safety reason. I am so unused to walking in boots that I feel very clumsy in them, in addition to the jarring of my joints. I can walk more lightly barefoot, even though I have to carry the heavy load of skis and boots on my rucksack.

Otherwise, I barely wear shoes at all....., especially when bare!
Tread lightly upon the earth!

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #38 on: February 19, 2016, 11:13:07 PM »
Wow MartinM!

How long can you walk in snow barefoot.  Longest I've achieved is about 3-5 minutes!  Isn't there a high risk of damage e.g. frostbite, severe pain.
Where do you do the skiing?

John

Kayaker

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Re: Footies for tenderfoot
« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2016, 06:40:29 PM »
I was trying to find links to the water shoes For winter beach walking and winter kayaking.  This winter I went in deeper water nice and toasty with all the winter gear and could tolerate chilly conditions quite nicely because I was protected from the water for longer periods. 

I couldn't find picture links but there are three versions I like.  Mostly I like NRS's gear for shoes and gloves and pants, Body glove for rash guards and they have some good board shoes, and Keens and Cudas for shoes.  My favorite though is NRS, but you have to have narrow feet.

John P

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #40 on: February 23, 2016, 01:05:10 AM »
My friend Dan favors Vibram "Five Fingers" shoes. I call them his froggy feet. Here we are in Florida before we got far enough down the trail to undress (he likes kilts too):

MartinM

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #41 on: February 23, 2016, 08:25:12 AM »
Wow MartinM!

How long can you walk in snow barefoot.  Longest I've achieved is about 3-5 minutes!  Isn't there a high risk of damage e.g. frostbite, severe pain.
Where do you do the skiing?

John
Depends very much on conditions. I have certainly gone half to one hour walking in snow and in good conditions would probably be ok for rather longer. Firm snow is easier than soft, powdery snow which gets all over the foot, as the top of foot has little insulation while the bottom has a thick sole from going barefoot 24/7.

My feet still have to condition to the cold each autumn and I never walk far if I start to feel significant numbness, although this is rare so long as I keep moving, even walking on the spot, if I can't find something insulating to stand on. It is however important to keep the body warm, as otherwise heat is withdrawn from extremities. My hands suffer the cold rather more than my feet, as they are not working, and we are only talking one or two degrees of frost.

I have Vibram 5 fingers which were great initially, but now prefer Sockwas as my standby footwear.  They are thinner, lighter and more flexible, so can be rolled up and put in pockets ans slipped on quickly if required. Generally kept for sharp, manmade tracks or in my local case, sharp, eroded limestone.
Tread lightly upon the earth!

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #42 on: February 26, 2016, 04:34:51 PM »
Ah, I see, Martin,
like so many achievements it's down to practice and conditioning.
My feet aren't too horny as, whilst I go barefoot a lot it's in domestic and 'light duty' circumstances.  In the UK if you walk on snow at all it is usually fresh/soft and near melting thus I suspect it has high heat conductivity, taking the heat from your foot quickly.  It is unusual in the UK to find snow lasting long enough or there being enough places to walk that reproduces the more compacted snow you describe.  My walks on snow have almost exclusively been naked.  In fact I now wonder what my duration on snow would be if well and warmly clothed.

Thanks for the info - the differences really interesting .

John

MartinM

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #43 on: February 27, 2016, 08:41:20 AM »
Minus 4 C is rare here so I only have one experience ( other than brief early morning walks in the frost) of walking in these conditions and in the snow and. I believe I got a little frost nip after half to one hour, but it was the kind of partially melted and refrozen snow you fall through at each step.

However, I live in the Lake District where we freqently have snow on the hills and I go ski-ing to one place where we have a tow. I would go today, but think I have too much work to do. Anyway, I usually walk barefoot until there is sufficient snow to ski and on the return. My most difficult snow experience is deep (about 18 inches) powder snow where it covers the whole lower leg at each step, because only the sole of foot is well insulated from being regularly barefoot.

I remember years ago the pain in my feet of walking into a cold sea, probably above 10 degrees C, which I would now consider quite warm. However, there is definitely a significant degree of annual conditioning to the cold.

Not sure how I would get on in minus 10. If we ever get that here I will let you know.....
Tread lightly upon the earth!

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2016, 12:29:22 PM »
Martin,
Lake District!  What made me think you were in the US!
How nice to live there.  I was there holidaying for a few days, with some US friends, last July. 
At one point I had a sad disappointment at a missed opportunity which oddly has returned, haunting me quietly over the last few days.
Standing on the shore of Lake Ullswater on a sunny weekday late afternoon after the crowds had dispersed, around 6-6.30pm I recall, I found myself alone, away from the others and staring into clear, clear water with a shallow slope down to dark, greenish depths.  How I wanted to throw my clothes off and swim.  One of my friends then strolled up (of the female persuasion) and I shared my desire with her and invited her to join me or at least look after my wallet and mobile.  Whilst she is generally the sort of person that 'goes for it', I was surprised that she calmly but firmly talked me out of it.  On what grounds, you may ask?  The 'public' nudity (Although there were very few people around, it was actually rather close to the boat tours dock albeit closed for the day), and not having a towel therefore wasting time waiting for me to dry off...and you don't need to exercise much grey matter to deduce which was the more firmly argued!  I should have just bunged her my trousers and dived in.  By the time we'd finished argy bargying that one, my wife and my friend's husband had appeared and the moment had passed.  After a bit more walking about we went to a nearby restaurant and had a pleasant dinner.

I mention the latter point as after this year's floods I saw a national TV news article video'd from the same locale and there was not a lot left of the lake trips jetty and the restaurant was a wreck!

Later, researching wild swimming, I read about the surprisingly high number of people who acquire a range from minor hospitalisation to death from spontaneously jumping in to Lake District Lakes in just the manner I described.  They seize up or faint or get swept by currents and get hypothermia or otherwise due to wind, currents, the cold water and/or the gasping that generates.  Whilst I suspected the water might be dangerously cold, the shallow walk into swimming depth looked pretty safe.

Any experience of Lake District Skinny dipping, Martin?

John