Author Topic: Bare Feet  (Read 24360 times)

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #135 on: December 10, 2018, 08:33:43 PM »

Ah yes, BT.
I guessed you were not foolhardy enough to be that intrepid.  Wearing boots allows you to enjoy that terrain in safety and comfort.
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #136 on: December 11, 2018, 02:47:24 AM »
I disagree Bluetrain.

They have just been pictured with those coverings by European invaders. There have been archeological reed shoes found around here, but most of the time around the village barefoot all over was more common before the invasions. Our feet are geared by nature to be effective for all uses. Snow, running off trail in cactus, these required some sole cover like huaraches. Running down animals wasn't evolutionary because we learned to use shoes.

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #137 on: December 11, 2018, 02:54:48 AM »
I should ditto on of Nuduke's questions. I know it was discussed years ago, but I have acquired a callus like cracking patch on the side of one of my toes.

I scraped other area, like my heal and applied Utter Balm, and got on top of it. However, the side of one big toe still has a thick nasty deep crack ugly thing going on. Perhaps being more tenacious with the scrape /Udder Balm protocol and some Epsom salt soaks. I tend to get impatient and get carried away with the scraping. I end up raw and sore.

Suggestions oh brothers of the unshod?
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #138 on: December 11, 2018, 12:20:14 PM »
I suppose I could under most circumstances when I was otherwise nude wear nothing on my feet but I suspect I'm well past the age when I could acclimatize reasonably well. There are similar discussions among those who run about feet and shoes. At least one Olympic competitor ran barefoot. Unfortunately, she had a run-in with another competitor and did not do well. Apparently, the discussions revolve around how wearing footwear, in that case, running shoes, affects how you use your foot. I have read certain writers who gave advice about how to walk (in the woods). I had that advice in mind the other day when I was out tramping through the woods but I was unable to determine if my technique was correct or even passable. But I made it home just the same.

One thing I have noticed is that since the leaves have fallen, it's more difficult to tell where to place my foot when walking, boot or no boot. The leaves cover everything from holes, roots, limbs and loose rocks. Maybe raking the woods isn't such a bad idea after all.

In any case, I see no reason to follow what someone else did five thousand years ago regarding their feet and footwear, no more than I follow what people wear in central Africa, Borneo, or Austria, where they were those funny shoes with the shoe laces on the side.

jmf

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #139 on: December 11, 2018, 04:22:15 PM »
At least one Olympic competitor ran barefoot.
Abebe Bikila ran and won the olympic marathon of Roma in 1960 barefoot.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_zRr9KOFWE
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 04:26:59 PM by jmf »
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

BlueTrain

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #140 on: December 11, 2018, 04:34:29 PM »
There was another one rather later.

Here, until the temperature gets down to what it's been lately, runners generally wear very little, t-shirt and shorts, but in cooler temperatures, many wear gloves.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 04:36:00 PM by BlueTrain »

Bob Knows

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #141 on: December 11, 2018, 05:40:52 PM »
Abebe Bikila ran and won the olympic marathon of Roma in 1960 barefoot.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_zRr9KOFWE

It wasn't real Olympics unless the runners were naked.

Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #142 on: December 12, 2018, 12:18:38 AM »
I suppose I could under most circumstances when I was otherwise nude wear nothing on my feet but I suspect I'm well past the age when I could acclimatize reasonably well. There are similar discussions among those who run about feet and shoes. At least one Olympic competitor ran barefoot. Unfortunately, she had a run-in with another competitor and did not do well. Apparently, the discussions revolve around how wearing footwear, in that case, running shoes, affects how you use your foot. I have read certain writers who gave advice about how to walk (in the woods). I had that advice in mind the other day when I was out tramping through the woods but I was unable to determine if my technique was correct or even passable. But I made it home just the same.

One thing I have noticed is that since the leaves have fallen, it's more difficult to tell where to place my foot when walking, boot or no boot. The leaves cover everything from holes, roots, limbs and loose rocks. Maybe raking the woods isn't such a bad idea after all.

In any case, I see no reason to follow what someone else did five thousand years ago regarding their feet and footwear, no more than I follow what people wear in central Africa, Borneo, or Austria, where they were those funny shoes with the shoe laces on the side.
People's feet adjust pretty quickly to barefoot. Not like they have been bare all of life, but they get pretty good.

Shoes generally train a body to walk unnaturally. In many cases to detriment. The whole functions as a unit, each part adjusting to the other. Back problems, balance, sciatica, clear up to a sore neck can acquire pain from posture and shoe style. Many people have difficulty training the movement of the body to adjust to barefeet and toe to heel movements. They get sore ankles, and lower leg pain. They have to retrain.

Since I have adjusted from cowboy boot heels, I have much less back problems. I don't slouch as much. My gait is more natural, but still I have to keep working at it, because my body has been trained to adapt. I can feel the difference and feel the improvement.

So, I have reason to readjust. It is a part of my getting younger program along with diet and exercise, barefoot all over, naturally works out much more efficiently. BAck disorder and improper habits cause the spine, a corridor for everything healthy and nerves, to cause health issues in organs, etc. For example, I thought I had  prostrate something years ago. I went to a chiropractor and it was gone with one adjustment.

I am the direct result of what someone did for millenia before those modern shoes, modern clothing, the new fake food, etc. I'd feel foolish to not take note of my ancestry and turn my back on my humanity. I'm telling you that I'm getting younger.

People tend to mistake wear and tear as old age, but it is very often just ill adapted habits catching up with them.

I might add that it is certainly about the biology of belief.

Yes, bodies do age over time. That's natural stuff, but that is only a small piece of aging. Getting old, or these other beliefs are a lot about stories we tell ourselves, belief blinding us, pain and injuries overwhelming us, doctors and culture telling us something that isn't true, when all we need to do is change, and stop so easily following, believing, what others tell us.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #143 on: December 12, 2018, 11:17:19 AM »
Cowboy boots were not made for walking but for riding a horse. However, I suppose it could be argued that riding a horse is unnatural. And likewise, those who ride horses consider walking unnecessary. But let's not get into a discussion of whether saddles and stirrups are natural or not. Or horseshoes.

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #144 on: December 13, 2018, 06:16:04 PM »
AH yes, the necessity of chaps! Is it better bareback and barearse? Chappy saddle or slimy wet horse to sit on, or just a sit towel wrapped around the horse?

That does bring to mind the heel and boot and riders opposed to foot soldiers, who had no heels, but barefoot and flat soles.

Status gave us heels. Horses gave us heels.

We walk better and are healthier without the heels. Cowboys don't like to hear that.

Heels make taller looking people. People generally like taller, so say the research studies.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #145 on: December 13, 2018, 08:08:10 PM »
You don't need chaps to ride a horse. That's what you get from listening to Ralph Lauren. And no self-respecting cowboy would walk if at all possible. And no self-respecting four-wheeler would go hiking. I never did any nude hiking while I had a 4x4. But I didn't do any nude driving, either; never thought of it. But my particular 4x4, a 1965 Land-Rover, was cold in the winter and it always seemed to be winter.

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #146 on: December 13, 2018, 10:10:03 PM »

My Nakefit foot soles arrived very promptly!  They are really weird - just a thin plastic film that sticks along the sole of your foot and toes.  I imagined they would be a bit thicker than they are so that they would provide some walking protection.  It'll be odd to try them!  Can't wait for a suitable day to get out and walk the road and the sward with apparently bare feet.  You can't just try them on and take them off and store them for a later walk - they are single use items.  Although they were only about £2 a pair (I got a 3-pack) it's quite a price for a day's wear.  If one buys a £50 pair of shoes they can last years!  Certainly if a pair of 'standard' shoes at £50 were labelled to last just 25 days wear (equivalent of £50 worth of the Nakefit soles), you wouldn't consider them very good value, would you?!
But that's not the point is it.  Nakefit soles are a barrier between the desire to be barefoot and the modern environment which offers every obstacle to being barefoot.


Jbee!  Get to a chiropodist and get all the hard skin and callous pared off.  I do this 3 times a year and it prevents me having to live with cracked skin on the sole and heel.
It's a bit frightening as she (for the chiropodist is a lady) pares the skin with a surgical scalpel!  But it's painless and I have beautiful feet! (not).  For the 1st 2 or 3 days after a treatment I don't challenge them to walking on anything that might cut the softer skin under the callouses.  Between times I keep the callous from building up with sandpaper or an abrasive hard skin scraper. 


John

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #147 on: December 14, 2018, 09:36:11 PM »
Waiting for the full report in the pads, on those cold surfaces and forest floors. I want to hear about how they do in water.

Yea, at two bucks a pop, I'd have to wear them all day on special occasions. I wear pairs of my five toes hiking and for nothing else, so that's 25 days and their price is 50 plus days.

I like the way the five toes protect me from stubbing my toes.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #148 on: December 20, 2018, 09:45:31 PM »

It'll be a bit before I wear a pair.  After Christmas I'll look for a quiet day when I can take a walk in the countryside and see if the tootsies freeze or get bogged in mud and whether the soles work on pavement.  They will get wet alright!
John

MartinM

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #149 on: December 20, 2018, 10:46:42 PM »
To answer some of the questions, I will give a bit of my barefoot story.

A number of years ago, I had a problem with one of my feet, exacerbated when on long walks. A sports podiatrist diagnosed ‘collapsed metatarsal arch’ and suggested I needed orthotics, and that I first try Green Superfeet, expecting me to go back for more expensive bespoke orthotics. He couldn’t explain why anyone would develop this condition and I was not entirely convinced but thought I would try the Superfeet. In practice, I noticed no benefit and actually made my feet less comfortable.

The above set me off on a journey. An idea that had clearly lodged in my brain from a Trail magazine equipment report on minimalist equipment ‘less is more’ prompted me to move to wearing lighter boots, to walking sandals, which I used for a bit of early morning running ‘au naturel’ as well, but the breakthrough came with discovery of Vibram Fivefingers. The lightness and flexibility of these transformed my running so that I began to really enjoy it.

Despite a calf injury, which took about 6 months to properly go away, largely because I couldn’t hold off my early morning runs for long enough, I had been hooked by minimalist running. I went to an Alexander teacher who taught the benefits of barefoot walking for gait, posture, avoiding back problems. He taught me how to walk barefoot, strange at first, but very similar to running, landing on forefoot, underneath my centre of gravity, rather than heel toe walking. I also joined the Society for Barefoot Living, several of whom stresed the importance of walking completely barefoot, for at least part of the time, for feet to benefit fully from the feedback from all the nerves in the feet necessary for proprioception. Basically, the brain needs to rewire to benefit from all the extra sensation.

In 2011, I scaled Sca Fell (hightest mountain in England) in 5 fingers. The following winter I was tackling the Scottish hills in winter barefoot, when not enough snow to ski. At the same time, I was able to go barefoot at work, so was by then about 95% barefoot.

At Nudefest I did a five mile run around the camp site, including over some sharp grit over the site track. A lesson in not being macho! Although no real harm at the time, this caused a callus that slowly moved until eventually it caused a crack behind the ball of my foot. This has been the biggest problem of my barefoot career and I still have to watch it carefully. Unfortunately, with wearing shoes we have largely lost the knowledge of how to look after our feet, but avoid calluses developing if possible, and use pumice or whetever to remove them before cracks develop. Cracks can also develop around the edge of foot if skin gets too thick, so either remove dead skin where cracks developing and/or use cream.

In 2012 I achieved a challenge I set myself, walking completely barefoot over Striding Edge, a famous exposed ridge leading up to Helvellyn, the third highest mountain in England, I think. It was easier than I thought, and great fun, much more enjoyable than boots. I did it again last autumn. Climbing around other people roped up on the one tricky section and seeing their jaws drop was very funny.

The only situations I routinely use footwear is for ski-ing. I walk barefoot in snow if not too cold, not too technical eg hard and steep) and can keep moving..... Also for sailing in spring and autumn, as sat in a boat there is nothing to get the blood circulating. Occasional formal meetings I feel the need to be a little less conspicuous, and will wear my moccassins.

As for other challenges. I have had a few pubs that didn’t like me being barefoot, usually town pubs where broken glasses a real possibility, but still generally minimal risk. I have only ever once worn footwear because of their requirement. Several others I just argued the needlesness of their concern. A security guard in Tescos once cited hygiene (ridiculous) and then safety for not being barefoot but relented when I said I was responsible for my own safety. Another security guard in a megashop in Birmingham said barefoot wasn’t allowed, but when I asked a manager it was ok. One fast food place in Aviemore the obnoxious manager said ‘because I say so’ when I asked what why I couldn’t be barefoot. I was only being polite looking at the menu after nipping in touse their toilet.....

All in all, minimal problems in eight years of largely joyous barefooting. Apart from Forestry Commission tracks... They have a habit of surfacing their tracks from one side to the other with sharp, granite chippings. One reason to carry backup shoes, either Sockwas (very thin and will roll up and go in pocket) or huaraches, very hardwearing and simple.

I have rambled on far too much, but should say that barefooting is necessarily a very mindful way of walking and running. Running barefoot and naked on a beautiful fine early morning through the woods I can only describe as a spiritual experience.

Tread lightly upon the earth!