Author Topic: Bare Feet  (Read 24085 times)

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #90 on: June 28, 2017, 05:35:35 PM »
If I lived in a culture where the norm was bare feet, the terrain wasn't urban asphalt, concrete sidewalks, etc., and I was out and about naked each day, I'd have naked natural feet. I do my best, but I'm indoors, or in a prickley desert, and burning summer urban places, often, when I'm out and about. My feet feel trauma often when first barefoot.

It would take quite a lot of barefoot use to get me to run down a gazelle and not shred my feet. So, I compensate and feed the problem with various minimal shoes. I go bare foot as often as I can. Out on the trail, we stop and soon, strip off the shoes.

I love barefoot all over, but I can't always be barefoot, let alone all over. Even my less than primitive home makes trouble for barefoot ends. We take our shoes off when entering our homes and that works well. I can't be barefoot outside and put my feet up and cross legs yogi style on my couch. If I'm out and about, the mess on my feet destroys furniture, towels on furniture, etc. Parking lots, and gas stations are way messy. I'd be washing my feet constantly. Some common dirt outside and a home setup on the floor are something else entirely.

The Japanese that live to be 100 live in homes without shoes, they daily have to squat down numerous times to sit on tatamys and to low tables and habachis (please forgive the spelling). Their backs get stretched and supportive muscles are regularly used. Most westerners sit up in furniture. Their clothing doesn't allow the full stretch, so they actually need the furniture. A study was done with the results stating statistically that if you can't sit on the floor and get back up without using your arms that you will be dead within five years. That seems far fetched, but actually makes some sense to me. There is much truth to it. Then, I have to consider those weird shoes that so many traditional Japanese wear.

I have given thought to creating a more traditional Japanese or primitive style home, for that reason. It is more earthy and and closer to human nature and health. This civilized living is a very new practice in human history. It needs to be rethought. Then, there is the issue of house guests. It would be very uncomfortable for may of them when visiting, a cross cultural dilemma. "Oh Lois! First they want us accepting them unclothed and now they have us sitting on the floor!"

I'm thinking that I'll be leaving Tortolita for a more urban environment. There, I'll have a dirt lot to create a user friendly environment, instead of my natural environment. There, you can bet that I'll set the outside up for barefoot all over living. Most of my time is at home. I can have a varied running surface around the house, gardens, no scorpions and rattlesnakes to watch for and create more shade.

The noise and mosquitoes will be the negative. In this coming retirement, I plan to be out naked in real nature at least two days each week on an average to compensate. Health being the priority, this should be a part of a healthy lifestyle. I have been observing one place in nature intimately and its changes for 20 years, now. I'm going for more diversity and get out of the southwestern region more often (did I hear a voice say, "Trip Report"). I want to interact more, growing rich organic foods, exploring that piece of nature that I can eat. I live in the most biodiverse of deserts, a wonderland, but it is more stark and harsh for a human being to live healthy.

I've begun working with a foundation to create a healthy clothing optional environment on the property. I want more interaction and less driving time.

There is much more to that decision, but this is the free range naturist part of it, exploring the synthesis of natural living and modern civilized practical options. 
Jbee
« Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 05:45:36 PM by jbeegoode »
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #91 on: June 28, 2017, 09:34:18 PM »
What Jbee said!

It’s why when I am out and I spot a patch of desert that is clear of pricklys of any type, I immediately take off whatever is on my feet and enjoy it for a short time.

Absolutely and completely  - NAKED ! ! :D
WooHoo!!

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #92 on: June 28, 2017, 09:34:58 PM »
Jbee, I have been noticing recently that I am slower in getting up from the floor without at least a steadying hand on something. I just though I was getting old! :)
I'm just a poor old man. I have no time for law-breakers. My legs are grey. My ears are gnarled. My eyes are old and bent.

I never considered that furniture was the culprit, I am going to test this.

Duane

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #93 on: June 28, 2017, 10:10:27 PM »

Quote from: jbee
I'm thinking that I'll be leaving Tortolita for a more urban environment.
WHATTTTTTT!  Surely not?  How would you survive amongst the textiles?  You'd have to lock yourself away?
John

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #94 on: June 28, 2017, 10:29:27 PM »

Taking up Jbee's remarks about the Japanese healthy lifestyle, I saw a documentary on UK TV last night about traditional potters in Japan.  It centred around a family that had passed the art and craft down numerous generations.  The subject of the documentary worked in a business with his father who, in his eighties, was suffering from severe spinal scoliosis - he walked haltingly with a stick bent over with his torso almost 90 degrees to his legs. The western reaction was 'poor old guy' he's near the end. The film then immediately showed him settling down to his work at potters wheel and this old guy sat down on the low platform that the potters used and folded into tight cross legged seated position with one leg out to spin the wheel and began to work.  I marvelled at this.  A little later he was interviewed and his demeanour and speaking were obviously still pin sharp.  In the west we would provide aids whereby a stiff, arthritic old person might be prevented from having to bend too far or sit on the floor.  And so that westerner would atrophy further.  It was clear from this brief moment - perhaps 20 sec of the hour that the Japanese lifestyle of living on the ground on Tatami mats was far more healthy than anything we do in the west.  I shall continue my yoga!


I have to say, JBee, that I find sitting cross-legged with an upright back quite hard.  My round tummy and scoliotic back musculature tend to create the (spring loaded!) need to lean back.  I fight it somewhat unenthusiastically but it does seem to be a very 'grown in' weakness. I have to use my hands to get up therefore - Have I got less than 5 years?  Bollocks to that!  Nevertheless when we do pranayama or meditation in yoga class I sometimes kneel rather than sit cross legged then I can concentrate better not having to be distracted by extra the effort of sitting cross-legged.


John

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #95 on: June 28, 2017, 11:57:14 PM »
I began about ten years ago to try this yogi posture. It hurt and was impossible. In a week, I was able to get into position, but I was still uncomfortable. I found that doing it in a reclining chair took the strain from my back. I still prefer back support, even though the legs have been very happy through the 10 years crossed up. In fact it is preferable. The more I work with it, the better it gets. I'm sure I was capable of much quicker progress, but through the years, I've gotten better sitting like that. Still, it is more comfortable if my butt is higher than the legs. In the wild, I search out rocks that lean that way to lower my legs and can sit for long periods meditating and watching in peace. A level place doesn't last long. I have to lean forward after a relatively short time. I use a pillow, or cushion to elevate the butt often.

The spine and bone structure don't hold me up. They are a place for muscles and all associated to hang from. The muscle, fascia, etc. holds things up. It springs in equal and opposite reactions. I have had to take it easy for back injuries for like two decades, but recently the doc told me to just do old fashion sit ups, as I described in another thread today and the result is more than sciatic relief. While I'm there I stretch and integrate yoga moves and poses. It is getting easier for me to sit up cross leg. There is more muscle support, my slouch is correcting with the balance of front and back core. I can get up easier and easier from this. My cross leg preference helps, too when getting up.

I can remember sitting on tatamis in the traditional hotel in the hills at the base of Mt. Fuji as a 5 year old, not being comfortable to sit there and eat at that low table and no chairs. My body needs to be retrained and it needs muscle structure and exercise to do this after a lifetime of western civility. But, it is working and it is doable, and it will change the quality of my life dramatically to do what is more natural. I don't think that the yogi sit position is so very natural compared to a squatting position, so I do both. I am now often with discomfort sitting in a chair, however. I often wonder if people think that I'm trying to show off as super hippie when I sit in a chair cross legged, some tell me that they admire it, but it is just that it now feels better. I see squat sitting as an uncool look, still. I learned that in grade school when squatting and having some Bozo kid come by and pull me backwards. Nude, it makes genitals look like they are on display. It just isn't a usual sight in our culture. I have had female friends sit comfortably like this nude and I have had to adjust to the intimacy of it.

I suppose that it is like getting used to barefoot, or toe shoe running after a lifetime of shoes and boots. It takes adjustment and some time, but the result is amazing.

The other evening, DF and I were at a friends house. we had been swimming and had no desire to get dressed, as we sat on the couches munching and conversing. I had my sit down towel as is my naturist policy. Not only was I now using it to keep my bare butt off of the couch, but it also afforded me the opportunity to place my bare feet up on the furniture. I was uncomfortable with feet on the floor. I found that I wasn't leaning back at all. All very natural, I realized that I had spent a couple of hours like this, except to get up for another shrimp, or chip and salsa, or get more to drink. It surprised me and encouraged me. But, now I'm weird, except among my naked friends. I'll take my health and comfort and let them accept me as I am. I see others becoming unhealthy with age and with back troubles who would criticize me for my lack of conformity.

I have yoga instructor friends, who sit on the floor, and in healthy positions on furniture and are accepted that way. They look so limber, elastic, young and healthy, too.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Safebare

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #96 on: June 30, 2017, 04:29:58 PM »
I am reminded of a scene in 'Goats' where David Duchovny's character is having a conversation with Graham Phillips character, who comments that "nude men should not squat".  It is a great scene of natural nudity.
I have always recognized the pitfalls of western furniture, but never quite came to terms with the lotus position or floor sitting.  In other words, I have lived a long life in conflict between the culture I find myself in and where I 'belong'.  I find standing for long periods, easier than any of the sitting options.  My preferred chair is a sling type.  Forced to sit in a wheelchair has impacted my reality.  The longer I sit in it, the longer I can sit in it.  It's like ice cream.  When I'm eating it, life is good.  It's not until I stop eating it that I realize how bad it really is.  Maybe coffee would offer the same revelation.  I probably will never know.

I am challenged through the words expressed in this forum.  That encourages me to push on.

eyesup

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #97 on: June 30, 2017, 10:29:12 PM »
It might be interesting to follow the historical and anthropological development of the chair.
Was it convenience or necessity?

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #98 on: June 30, 2017, 10:56:18 PM »
Was it a social distortion, where those that sit higher had a throne-like advantage? Was it for ego problems. Was it a fear of crawly bugs? What necessity is a chair, or couch?
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Safebare

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #99 on: June 30, 2017, 11:28:54 PM »
I think furniture developed along a similar vein to clothes.  Some furniture certainly makes life easier, such as the workbench.  All other probably evolved out of the disparity from those that have and those that don't.  The thrones of royalty were not built for comfort, but to demonstrate status.  People were sitting in the dirt or on a rock, until someone decided to build a chair.  Then someone else built a chair and covered it with animal hide.  Once you built it, you certainly were going to sit on it, if only to make the rest jealous.  Now, it has become a gazillion dollar industry.

eyesup

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #100 on: July 03, 2017, 02:45:48 AM »
I would lay odds that it began as a convenience. A place to sit and take care of your feet or footwear. Most people lay down on mats, covers or other reclining places to eat or relax after eating and conversing. Chairs were probably invented for the ‘royal person’. It just dominoed from there.

Duane

Bob Knows

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #101 on: July 03, 2017, 02:01:50 PM »
I would lay odds that it began as a convenience. A place to sit and take care of your feet or footwear. Most people lay down on mats, covers or other reclining places to eat or relax after eating and conversing. Chairs were probably invented for the ‘royal person’. It just dominoed from there.

Duane

In the Roman Empire a dining room had raised benches for reclining while eating.  A dining room with benches on 3 sides of the table was called the "triclinium." 

My knees have never worked well enough to squat instead of sit.   While fancy chairs probably weren't produced until woodworking and carpentry became skilled trades, I suspect that ancestors sat on logs or stone benches when available.
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #102 on: July 03, 2017, 04:58:38 PM »
Went to Vibram to get those shoes. They were out of stock. Guess Vibrams executive's egos are asunder, for a stupid callus decision by now.

I did find some of the old styles on Amazon! Does rubber go bad like tires?
Jbee




Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #103 on: July 04, 2017, 10:36:12 PM »
Synthetic rubber will dry out and crack if it’s hot and low humidity, like here. But it will take a while.
Don’t know how long real rubber lasts.

I used to be able to get climbing shoes that had soles made from real rubber. They were ‘stickier’ than synthetic rubber, but the lifetime on climbing shoes was short. Depending on how often you climb.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #104 on: April 04, 2018, 07:44:38 PM »
Vibram is getting more correct in their lineup this year. They have three styles that fit the first concept with a heel strap that helps us with duck's feet to keep them from falling off of our heels. Trek sport, V-agua and good 'ol KSO. Google their website and the go to "shop." Sorry, I didn't check the women's.

I'm curious about the new V-agua. Tiny holes to allow water through. Is that through the sole, or a pattern helping flow from doing a hydro-plain kind of action?

They are available, but for how long?
Jbee
 
Barefoot all over, all over.