Author Topic: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)  (Read 12272 times)

jbeegoode

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #75 on: July 14, 2017, 09:19:03 PM »
Appalachia has been noted for a strong cultural component of old time religious practices, which has had an influence on the area. Until your correspondence made it seem less so, I figured that was still the case. Then, I thought, maybe it is just in the more remote hills and my impressions were wrong. Your area is the place to go for things like pure untouched old European folk music studies and folk medicines. That culture, I now suspect has sustained itself and is now just being more assertive.

It may be a culture that accepts skinny-dipping to be practical, but not adults in mixed company. That same culture is stronger religious based, than science based. The old music has medieval roots, and so do other aspects of the culture. It is like people go to study pure Castiliano language in the Medellin region of Colombia, instead of in Europe.

Yea, there are things still around that are of the Dark Ages. There are whole countries around the world wrapped up in medieval, feudal, even a tribal world view. Why not here, too?

Most of my early family in America came to find religious freedom, but their religions were horribly intolerant of others. I have records of all seven brothers and sisters, only a generation here, being excommunicated and cast out for marrying outside of their religion.

Rules of "modesty" seem to vary in opinion.
Jbee
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reubenT

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #76 on: July 15, 2017, 06:59:08 AM »
Look at religion and that's what we see,   all manner of corruption and violence,   plenty of intolerance and "I'm better than you" pride.     Look at Jesus and the Bible and I see pure love,  humility that generates peace,   innocence of nudity,   rules that make sense with the basic principal of "do unto others as ye would have them do unto you"      Too many people profess to believe in that book and live by it,  but don't bother to actually read it and live by it,  instead inventing their own rules to live by according to their selfish desires and faulty understanding.      If everyone would actually conform their lives to the teaching of that book it would be a wonderful world. 

   As for skin cancer,   it's a product of diet mostly,  the sun is only a side issue.     I've heard of people eliminating cancers of all sorts just by changing their diet to imitate the original diet gave to man.  100% plant derived and 100% unprocessed and uncooked.  As a short term thing blood root salve will kill abnormal cell growth,  apply it to the skin cancer,  melanoma,  mole,  wort, or whatever,  it dies, pulls loose and falls out, leaving a hole to heal over. 

The original perfect lifestyle presented in the Bible,  designed by our Creator for our perfect health and happiness,  was naturist in style and raw vegan in diet.  Nude gardeners getting plenty of sun exposure and eating all the wonderful bounties a tropical paradise garden could offer.   As the basic trend of the story goes they lost it due to failing the love and faith test,    The Creator invented a rescue plan, and put it in operation.  Demonstrating His love in the process as an example for us to follow.     And according to the time line laid out in prophecy 2500 years ago we are real close to the end of the process.    Yes,  every point of those old prophecies in the books of Daniel and revelation have been fulfilled right on time.  7 times in the books of Daniel and Revelation the time period is given that the roman pontiff would rule the world, 1260 years,  and it happened right to the very year.  538 AD when the power of the roman empire was handed to the bishop of the roman church,  to 1798 AD when the French general took the pope prisoner, effectively eliminating his power.    Most professed chrisitians have ignored it all,  the few who figured them out in detail get condemned because it's just not very popular to preach that  we're on the verge of dooms day and that the "mark of the beast"  actually involves the most common christian malpractice of all time which very few are willing to change.      But dooms day for this world just means the end of evil and restoration of naturist life in the tropical paradise for those who throw out all their false religions, their loud proclamations of holiness, impressive church ceremonies;  and just learn to love others like Jesus did.   So that's not a bad thing.   The pending end of all evil and reward of all good should be a welcome message.   

  So why don't all professed christians promote the naturist lifestyle?   since it was the original perfect life we had in the beginning,  and the perfect life we look forward to at the end.     There should be nothing but great benefit to instill all we can of it in the present life.            Forgetting to look to the good book for instruction they invent their own rules to live by.   They end up calling good evil and evil good.  Isaiah said   "Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!"    And yet religionists have been foremost in doing just that in many areas of life for thousands of years.    We need to discard all that religious nonsense, including anti naked foolishness,   and get down to the real naked simple truth that true pure religion consists of nothing but love,  everything done with love as the motivator.   The foundation of the law of God is love,   part of it as what we do to show love for our Creator,  and the rest being what we do in love to ourselves and those around us.    Everything done out of love is a joy to do.   If we really love each other we will naturally do it and consider the alternative as unthinkable.      "And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold." Matt.24:12

John P

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #77 on: July 15, 2017, 03:44:59 PM »
If I believe in anything, it is "healthy incredulity". If your religion, or your dietary preferences, suit you, then fine. But given that authorities on just about every topic disagree, then I'm going to be very reluctant to believe any of them entirely.

As Jonathan Swift said, "The best three doctors are Dr Diet, Dr Merryman and Dr Quiet".

John P

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #78 on: July 15, 2017, 03:57:22 PM »
Most of my early family in America came to find religious freedom, but their religions were horribly intolerant of others. ...

Rules of "modesty" seem to vary in opinion.
Jbee

A while ago I visited Plimoth Plantation, a re-creation of the first English settlement in New England. There they have actors who play the parts of people known to have lived there in the 1620s, and if you talk to them they'll answer you in rural British accents. So it was a day in July, and I was in my usual public garb of shorts, teeshirt and sandals. There was a man digging with a spade, in breeches and and stockings, plus a shirt and jacket. I said to him, "That looks like hot work in weather like this!" And he replied, "Hot, yes of course it's hot. But I didn't leave half my clothes at home, like you did!"

https://www.plimoth.org/

eyesup

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #79 on: July 15, 2017, 11:10:27 PM »
Quote from: Jbee
. . . there is a smoking gun and a lot of powerful liars lies being pushed for profit.
This is true everywhere. The old maxim ‘caveat emptor’ certainly applies. It can be tiresome to constantly have to check the veracity of everything, but on the more important things it is always a good idea.

In the marketplace, trust no one.
Or as Reagan told Gorbachev, ‘doveryai, no proveryai, “trust, but verify.”
Good advice no matter the source. ;D

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #80 on: July 15, 2017, 11:13:09 PM »
Quote from: nudewalker
I don't think it's science catching up as much as it is debunking moralists or religious teaching.
God gave us a brain and curiosity to explore, study and understand His creation. Why do people get so afraid when scientists start to describe it?

Is a puzzlement!

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #81 on: July 15, 2017, 11:20:09 PM »
John, I have visited Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia, where they do something similar. If you ask a question about anything that happened or was invented after that time period, they look at you and ask, “What’s that?” or claim no idea of what you are talking about.

Great fun!

Duane

John P

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #82 on: July 16, 2017, 05:53:58 AM »
Yes, I can remember two other incidents during my visit to Plimoth Plantation. In one, there was a man building a house, and he was packing the wall cavity with something, maybe dried seaweed. A boy asked him, "Are you doing that for insulation?" and he responded, "I don't know that word. But it keeps the cold out, that's what it does."

And in one of the houses, there was a great big Bible, and the woman there asked a young girl, maybe 11 years old, if she could read from it. When the girl read a sentence or two, the woman smiled and said, "Oh, that's very clever. There aren't many of us that can read here, especially women. It's good to see a girl your age has managed to learn."

jbeegoode

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #83 on: July 16, 2017, 09:25:44 PM »
When we would do or SCA (Society for Creative Anachronisms) medieval recreation the events were in "grab". Everyone is encouraged to costume. When mundane current dress is encountered, those are considered "naked!" People stop and stare at them, as if they are surprised that they are nude. Men will stand and smirk looking at the "naked ones" as if getting a sexual thrill. People will rush to find some cloth to cover them up.

One evening, a couple were going home early and she had dressed for the road, wandering back into camp to say goodbye. "Sir, how can you allow your lady to comport herself in such a brazen fashion?" "My lady, have you no shame?!!!"
Jbee
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nuduke

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #84 on: July 17, 2017, 11:47:18 PM »

Karla,
So sorry to hear about your medical issues.  There's no justice, is there?  From what one could gather from the Naked Munros previously and FRN today, you and Stuart had/have a pretty healthy and fit lifestyle which, as you observe, may in fact have been protecting you but, it seems, perhaps only temporarily.  Maybe there were too many Scottish fried breakfasts to stoke up for the next munro in years past!?


I have read the voluminous output of this thread with interest.  Whether it be matters of faith or matters of the relative merit or harm of foodstuffs and diet habits, or personal responses to one's medical problems, unless we ourselves are expert across a vast field of learning, there is such a ridiculous profusion of "expert" voices, opinions, guidance, proscription and prescription, research, counter research, changing dietary and medical practice that it is impossible to find a path to truth and health for any individual (particularly when a proportion of 'experts' are out and out charlatans).  And if you do find a dietary or medical guru, often to follow their regime is complex, expensive and arduous.  I tend to side with 'moderation in all things' and relying heavily on one's own findings about diet changes and health practices.  Whilst Jbee's approach to managing his own health is bewilderingly wide ranging and eclectic, nevertheless I applaud the long term over which he has tested and found solutions that fit his need.  You can't do that without careful trial and objective comparison (where that is possible if you are the subject of your own research with a sample population of one!).


Not everything is addressed by 'virtuous practices' either.  My wife has IBS and finds great benefit in adjusting her diet towards many things you are not supposed to.  For instance eating lots of veg and fibre definitely exacerbates her condition and eating white bread, pasta, potatoes and white food in general has a very noticeable settling effect when, in theory it shouldn't.  Heaven knows what else it is adversely affecting but the most acute need is addressed.


On that line of thought in respect of your changing your consumption of fats, Karla, if it works that's great.  I guess it will be a long haul to prove that.  If you never had another MS attack would that prove cutting fats worked?  There's no way of telling.  But if you feel the benefit then that has to be fine for the individual.  Perhaps you can prove benefit by reverting to previous diet and witnessing the return of adverse symptoms.  But why would one want to court that negative possibility?  My view is to get on with what seems appropriate and keep doing what works over time.  I think that's been Jbee's way.


John

eyesup

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #85 on: July 17, 2017, 11:47:41 PM »
I stood in the joinery in Colonial Williamsburg and watched the joiner work his trade. Using mallets and extremely sharp chisels of many shapes, he was making mortise and tenon joints for the casework in a new building they were building. He consistently deflected all attempts to get him to acknowledge any sort of discussion of newer technologies.

I poked about there then went and inspected the framed walls and roof of the new building.
Not a bolt anywhere. Square nails, yes, no bolts.

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #86 on: July 18, 2017, 12:00:11 AM »
I just came aware of the extreme topic drift here.
From medical to mechanical.

Ahh, well! Always interesting.

Duane

jbeegoode

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Re: Medical evidence or (Who didn't know this?)
« Reply #87 on: July 18, 2017, 02:12:57 AM »
There seems to be an epidemic of irritable, or bleeding bowel, gut imbalance, colon this and that, gluten intolerant, belly achin'. There also seems to be quite a bit of controversy as what is going on and how to deal with it. It seems to be more women than men being affected, going on for years, now, but I have no statistics. Everybody's wondering what's up down there.

DF is so fed up, discouraged and frustrated that she is now trying a Bolivian Andes witch doctor, Aruvedic, and Chinese herbal/acupuncture person's diet suggestions to see how it works out as she gets poked with needles. This stuff has to do with diet and balance, because that is what has been fixing the problems. The doctors are pill, symptom oriented, with woefully little nutritional knowledge and inclination. Most of it has something to do with the gut and its 17,000 bacterial components, ecologies and balances. Antibiotics, chemo and weird new foods and unnatural diets are getting blamed, and that often makes sense. There is something new afoot. Seems that something old would be the solution.

Then there are some people that do so much tinkering that it is obvious that they are just making themselves sick.

I'd best say no more, but this...everything is better if you are naturally naked. We know at least that for a fact.
Jus' sayin',
Jbee
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 02:18:36 AM by jbeegoode »
Barefoot all over, all over.