Author Topic: Walk in the Cotswolds  (Read 2613 times)

jbeegoode

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Re: Walk in the Cotswolds
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2017, 04:02:06 AM »
I have read and heard from different sources that the exchanges in biological cultures that resulted from the 1st encounters between natives and Europeans was significant on both sides. But, as John says, more so on the American side. They were unable to recover from it. Aside from the devastating effects of smallpox in the Americas, I have read that syphilis was carried back to Europe by Columbus’ crew. So there were terrible costs on both sides from initial contact.

We watched a show on PBS years ago essentially made from Jared Diamond’s, ‘Guns, Germs and Steel’, that highlighted how western civilization was so much more prepared for exploration than any other on the planet. You could make the argument that infectious diseases brought here from Europe would probably qualify today as genocide.

World explorers. From Indonesia, Phoenicia and Europe, it’s been going on a long time.

Duane
Yea, many tens of millions dead from diseases, the rest enslaved and worked to death by the tens of thousands, wiping out entire populations routinely, that qualifies as genocide. That was just Columbus and company in the beginning between 1495 and 1515 in the Caribbean.  Cruelty like selling human body parts as dog meat in the Panama market is a step further, I suppose. I don't think that comparing that to the outbreak of VD is a fair comparison.

One reason for the genocide was about the Native Americans who were first sold as slaves in Spain (Columbus went back for 500, of which 200 died in transport). There was disgust at how civilized THEY weren't. The complaint was that they would stand in the market place entirely oblivious and comfortable naked, "like animals." This naked savages attitude created the policy for centuries and still is in vogue among highfalutin throwbacks today ("they're still out there"). These are among the roots of our predicament. Ethnocentric attitudes believing different people as less than human, because they are naked, natural and nice to others.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

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Re: Walk in the Cotswolds
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2017, 07:44:59 AM »
Quote from: Jbee
I don't think that comparing that to the outbreak of VD is a fair comparison.
I am not saying that the two are equal. The Europeans brought smallpox and they took syphilis back to their home. Unfortunately smallpox is infectious, with syphilis there has to be contact it moves much slower..

When you embark to explore, the danger is more than merely a physical one. Misunderstanding between cultures is probably the most ignored aspect of follow-up contact. There is the initial contact where those exploring find a new people and culture. Then there is the follow-up where those bearing the cost seek compensation. No matter the culture, the need to be compensated is very strong. Therein lie the possibilities of depravity.

Duane

nuduke

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Re: Walk in the Cotswolds
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2017, 11:40:31 PM »

Unlike the water laws and sharing rights for water in the US discussed below, the riparian drainage laws in the uk deal with how to get rid of the enormous excess of it which falls upon our heads in this land!


John