Author Topic: Naked Nudity  (Read 1237 times)

nudewalker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 643
  • Normal is a setting on a dryer!
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2018, 04:24:23 AM »
Considering that it was almost fifty years ago if the artist does get her work out there good for her. I'd recognize it only from seeing it when she was done but I doubt at this time anyone would identify me as the subject.
"Always do what you are afraid to do"-Emerson

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1066
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2018, 09:35:04 PM »

Quote from: Blue Train
I wonder if posing as a nude model for a roomful of artists (and would-be artists) might be an example of naked nudity. It would not necessarily be embarrassing but being the only one naked would have to be different.
It would, I think, BT.
Being a bit of an amateur artist ('bit' being the operative word), I recently joined a life class to try and get my ability to represent the human form from abysmal up to awful and thence to terrible with a target of reaching inept within a decade.  But seriously, although I have done but one class so far (they are monthly) this gave me a bit of an insight into the very matter you raise.  Never having done a life class before, but having heard about them from someone I know who has run them for local authority-run art and craft courses, my expectation was for an overweight bloke or a portly mature woman to be the model.  Judge of my surprise when the model turned out to be a very attractive young woman in her late 20s with a voluptuous figure and long dark hair.  (Random Though; Have I related this happening already?  If so apologies).
Any way, the 9 artists were seated around the front room of a house which was of the order of 12ft x 16ft, thus not much room to swing the proverbial cat and in relatively close association with the model.  In a naturist sense, I was most impressed by the model.  She was a professional art model and seemed very relaxed in her skin.  She was naked, no draped sheets or other cover up and she took up a number of poses across the 3 hour session (break for coffee) and complied with the class leader's request for poses irrespective of whether they were sitting kneeling, lying or that exposed her genitals.  Between sessions she didn't don a robe but did come over and look at the work, sit or stand and discuss it with several of the artists.  Very relaxed naturist in my opinion.  In the break she donned a light bath robe.
The point being, you don't get more exposed that that, really, in front of a bunch of strangers whose job is to look intently at you.  So yes, it was naked nude, nowhere to hide and in this case admirably comfortable with herself.
One of the other artists noted in conversation with me after the class that not all models are so self assured.  Some are evidently rather self conscious and this also tends to make the artists a little nervous.  I also found the class very tiring as the sessions are timed to 15 or 20 mins (so the model doesn't get tired or too stiff) and the level of concentration of the artists was palpable.
Roll on class 2!
John

BlueTrain

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 183
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2018, 10:44:25 PM »
From abysmal to inept within a decade? I'm sure you'll make it.

Although the nude figure, both male and female, adult and child, have been almost standard art subjects for centuries, more in some centuries than others, your comments made me think of something. Even nude, people somehow manage to reflect the period in which they lived, or more correct, the period in which the artist is working. A hundred and twenty-five years ago, the typical adult male and female looked different from the same today, to a greater or lesser degree, I believe. The differences might have been most apparent in the hair and I'm not sure if that should be considered superficial or not. But given how much attention is devoted to one's hair (our remaining plumage, so to say), it's probably anything but superficial. An exception might be when the artist is doing a work in another era, which is certainly common enough. You may have noted that Michelangelo's David may or may not have a historically accurate hairdo but it doesn't seem likely that the model for the statue was Jewish.

Anyway, nude artwork more often than not, I think, reflects prevailing fashion for what bodies ought to look like and for the most part, really did. Ancient Greek statues certainly did. So, some representation I saw of a nude couple in around 1880 or 1890 depicted the man with a full mustache and the woman with what you might call a Gibson Girl hairdo. But the male figure in the Pioneer plaque (1972 and 1973) has a decidedly early 70s hair style but is clean shaven--all over. It's probably not a good idea to read too much into such things, though. There are also artistic conventions that are followed but sometimes consciously ignored. And besides, you can't put everything into one piece of artwork.

I don't know what you say to struggling artists but in theater, it's "break a leg."

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2033
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #33 on: April 19, 2018, 05:54:49 PM »
Well unless Michelangelo was more talented and inventive than Leonardo or as history tells us, he didnít have any images of the favored hair styles of the golden age of the Hebrews. Artists work in their own knowledge so we usually see a stylised rendering.

Quote from: BlurTrain
I don't know what you say to struggling artists but in theater, it's "break a leg."
Check please! :D Our daughter is a cellist, so we use this one occasionally.

Duane

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2033
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #34 on: April 19, 2018, 06:00:31 PM »
Iíve tried before, not as diligently as you John, to draw the human form. I have yet to do a good job. Maybe it requires more practice. I am a draftsman (UK draughtsman) by training, over 30 yrs., and can draw practically anything inanimate.

Not so skilled at the animated objects.

Duane

nuduke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1066
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #35 on: April 26, 2018, 09:26:33 PM »

Interesting and entirely true observation there, Blue Train.  Not only hairstyles but preferences in body shape, particularly of the female form do change through the ages.  Just google the subject and loads of stuff falls out from anthropology to pornography.  It's interesting to note what features were preferred in both genders across time - for instance around the 1850s being plump was thought becoming for a man as it indicated wealth correlating with over indulgence in food and drink and lack of excercise.  Times do change!


Duane, I also succeed in reproducing plants, landscapes and inanimate objects much more successfully than humans or animals.  I think it's because our brains are so powerfully imprinted with some sort of model of what we think a human looks like that it guides our hand wrongly when we try to respoduce the actuality in front of us.  In reality we just don't really know where our noses are!  Most fiendish of all is drawing hands and feet.  I have agonies trying to do these!


John

jbeegoode

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2374
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #36 on: April 26, 2018, 10:51:24 PM »
It just takes more patience, concentration and focus to take a body and draw it rendered as it is. They can be set appropriately into correct proportions using a ruler and stick figures, then lay on to that to lighting of the reality. Yea, a face at 45 degrees takes time.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

eyesup

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2033
    • View Profile
Re: Naked Nudity
« Reply #37 on: April 27, 2018, 09:28:45 PM »
You are probably right, John about the preconceptions of the human form. I also tend to suspect that the prospect of trying to do that is intimidating knowing the end result is going to look like lab sketches by Herr Frankenstein.  :D

Duane