Author Topic: Somewhere in the Galiuros: Part II  (Read 450 times)

jbeegoode

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Somewhere in the Galiuros: Part II
« on: October 19, 2020, 02:12:34 AM »
The story continues of last Spring in a lovely canyon in the mountains.

https://thefreerangenaturist.org/2020/10/19/somewhere-in-the-galiuros-part-ii/

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

nuduke

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Re: Somewhere in the Galiuros: Part II
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2020, 05:01:33 PM »
You've left a real cliff hanger there, Jbee!  Will they return unscathed and before dehydration sets in?  Will our hero and heroine survive the mighty wilderness?  Tune in next week for our next exciting episode of...
It's not quite a s tension provoking knowing that you got back to post the report!!  I look forward to part III with anticipation, not least to envy the wonderful countryside yet again.
One question - You mentioned the presence of poison ivy.  This plant is a very iconic Americanism (e.g. Poison Ivy the 1950s song by The Drifters) to we Brits as we don't have an equivalent in UK.  What happens?  Is it a touch thing like nettles (I don't suppose you would eat it!) and what are the symptoms?
John

jmf

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Re: Somewhere in the Galiuros: Part II
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2020, 09:16:33 PM »
Not known in France either.
I like hiking, running, kayaking, biking, sailing, geocaching...naked of course!

jbeegoode

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Re: Somewhere in the Galiuros: Part II
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2020, 07:05:47 PM »
Most people are allergic to it; some are not. When I was very young my family moved into a new subdivision in Falls Church, Virginia, which had something like 36 trees in a big back yard, 2which was what was left of the forest. We got out there and cleared and raked leaves. Being wild, in VA., there was significant poison ivy. The leaves were burned by my brother. My teenage brother enjoyed the bonfire activity, until i time the fumes got his lungs and a significant rash occurred all over his body. The kid might have been hospitalized for a case of misery.

I have never shown signs of allergic reaction to it. As a teenager experimenting with BEER in the woods of Michigan on an overnight camping trip, I found that I had been rolling in the stuff, totally naked and ignorant of it in the dark. My pals had been dressed and stuck to the paths, mostly. They were miserable with an intensive, extremely compelling itch and I had nothing. It is an extreme itch to a burn and its intensity takes some time to wholly grab the victims undivided attention. Not having experienced it, but I can tell you that victims are extremely effected.

Here in Arizona, it looks a bit different, grows here and there and is pretty distinctive. It likes the richer ravines where things are more lush. I've read that it doesn't grow over 5200 ft. above sea level, but also it grows in between 3000 and 8000 feet. My experience is the former. It doesn't like the desert. It has been a rare occurrence where I have been, so far.

Allergy can change over time and this stuff out west is different, so you won't find me wallering in it naked, or wasted drunk either. :D I won't take a chance after watching friends deal with the effects.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/poison-ivy/symptoms-causes/syc-20376485

Most plants in Arizona are not good for skin contact, they protect themselves. Wandering naked, we avoid contact with most plants anyway.

“leaves of three, let them be”

Jbee







Barefoot all over, all over.