Author Topic: Bare Feet  (Read 23213 times)

jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #150 on: December 21, 2018, 02:49:10 AM »
To answer some of the questions, I will give a bit of my barefoot story.

A number of years ago, I had a problem with one of my feet, exacerbated when on long walks. A sports podiatrist diagnosed ‘collapsed metatarsal arch’ and suggested I needed orthotics, and that I first try Green Superfeet, expecting me to go back for more expensive bespoke orthotics. He couldn’t explain why anyone would develop this condition and I was not entirely convinced but thought I would try the Superfeet. In practice, I noticed no benefit and actually made my feet less comfortable....

 ....One reason to carry backup shoes, either Sockwas (very thin and will roll up and go in pocket) or huaraches, very hardwearing and simple.

I have rambled on far too much, but should say that barefooting is necessarily a very mindful way of walking and running. Running barefoot and naked on a beautiful fine early morning through the woods I can only describe as a spiritual experience.
I've had consistent disappointing experiences with podiatrists over the years. I've gotten better information from a boot maker. It seems like most just don't really understand the complexity and prescribe an insert, or hastily want to cut a foot up.

Oh how I hear you and it encourages me. I'll put a barefoot running walking path in my new yard with a variety of surfaces and uneven. It should do wonders to condition my body and mindfully exercise my spirit barefoot all over. It is, however, only one of a few spots to roam barefoot without potential peril anywhere near here. Maybe the San Pedro riverbed, but my feet are not well conditioned...today.
Jbee



Barefoot all over, all over.

nuduke

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #151 on: December 22, 2018, 06:07:10 PM »

Really interesting post, MartinM.
Interesting that you don't have to do much foot maintenance other than pumice and that your feet can endure any surface it seems!  My feet are prone to callusing around the heel mostly and I take care to ensure it doesn't build up because if it does the skin easily cracks.  It's just a matter of regularly scraping it off - I use an artificial pumice and sandpaper.  I get the excess skin carved off by a podiatrist 3 times a year.  I got the sandpaper tip from a previous colleague on TSNS (Graham) and I recently acquired a foot smoothing thing which is simply  12V motor with a flat disc and self adhesive abrasive discs.  Only used it once so far and it took a fair time (20 mins?) but the result was excellent in sanding down to reduce any tendency to cracking.  Needs a bit of flexibility and bodily contortion to get the disc and the sole in sufficiently good contact though!


It's also fascinating and inspiring that you can barefoot in most public places without people objecting except in the sort of cases you talk about.  I would tend not to want to walk about british town centres and high streets with bare feet as they are often so dirty.  The countryside sward is much nicer to walk on and I can't say I've tackled gravel or thick mud (yet) but as I seem o be barefooting more and more, this spring may see the liberation of my feet in more places!


John


BlueTrain

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #152 on: December 22, 2018, 09:46:20 PM »
If you went barefoot constantly, wouldn't your feet get callused over the entire bottom? I realize that may depend on where you walk but let's say you confined your bare-footing to the woods and grasslands and squishy bottomland, not rocky roads and of course the carefully maintained dirt floor of your cabin. On reflection, though, perhaps not, since, in theory, those places are all nice and soft. Well, soft, anyway.

But theory sometimes doesn't make it past reality and besides, you may not want to confine your perambulations. The trails I use or have used have been all over the place, though I suppose most could be managed well enough at the cost of reduced speed, allowing for tolerable weather. If worse came to worse, a pair of sandals might save the day and there are other options. There are sandals, sort of, called, I think, surf shoes, which are sandals intended for the wet and have toe protection, something I care about. And there are shoes intended to be worn in swimming pools to protect the feet from a sandpaper-like concrete surface, although they're more sock-like than shoe-like. And you can do what primitive and poor people all through the tropics do: wear flip-flops.

Bob Knows

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #153 on: December 22, 2018, 09:57:04 PM »
If you went barefoot constantly, wouldn't your feet get callused over the entire bottom? I realize that may depend on where you walk but let's say you confined your bare-footing to the woods and grasslands and squishy bottomland, not rocky roads and of course the carefully maintained dirt floor of your cabin. On reflection, though, perhaps not, since, in theory, those places are all nice and soft. Well, soft, anyway.

The soles of bare feet become leathery, not calloused.   
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
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jbeegoode

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Re: Bare Feet
« Reply #154 on: February 13, 2019, 02:06:45 AM »
I developed a callus and cracks on my toe particularly and more of this elsewhere. I mentioned it here a time back. The nurse practitioner suggested coconut oil. I picked up some pure organic. I use coconut oil for many purposes. I slush the stuff around in my mouth for cleaning, cook, eat, massage, sex, even take it out on the trail. The stuff is wonderfully versatile.

I applied it liberally, rubbed it in a bit. In a few days the foot eating caked stuff scrapped off (with a tool created for this), for the most part, but the cracks were deep. Two weeks and it's the cure.

There is another component of the problem. She said that the dry air contributes. I've always made a point to allow my feet all the air that I can. They apparently need some moister some of the time. Because any oil screws up my flooring, I put thick athletic socks on after applying the coconut oil, which traps air. My dear feet like it a few hours here and there.
Jbee

The Utterbalm works okay. This solution worked quickly and very well.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.