Author Topic: Ultra Light Backpacking  (Read 15479 times)

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #45 on: July 07, 2017, 08:42:51 PM »
South America. On the western side, all the way down. They are a huge range of huge mountains. Ya can't miss 'em.
I've been naked there! ;)
Jbee
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eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #46 on: July 08, 2017, 12:37:32 AM »
I remember reading an article a few years ago that llamas made better herd guardians than dogs. As I recall the article had to do with a sheep rancher who preferred them because of their protective instincts and fearless response to threats. They also require less maintenance than herd dogs.

There are a few ranchers here in Nevada, especially in the north, that use them to protect their sheep herds.

Duane

eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #47 on: July 08, 2017, 12:48:12 AM »
Yeah, John, South America.

The longest and 2nd highest mountain range in the world
From Columbia near the Panama Canal to Cape Horn, over 4,000 miles long
Has the driest desert, the Atacama, outside of the polar regions at an avg. elev. of 10,000 ft.
Look it up, it is a land of extremes

Duane

Rebus

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #48 on: July 09, 2017, 11:41:42 PM »
I remember reading an article a few years ago that llamas made better herd guardians than dogs. As I recall the article had to do with a sheep rancher who preferred them because of their protective instincts and fearless response to threats. They also require less maintenance than herd dogs.

There are a few ranchers here in Nevada, especially in the north, that use them to protect their sheep herds.

A formal study was conducted by Iowa State University, published back in 1994 when llamas were still a rather new thing in the US.  Without any special screening of llama placement by strong guarding instincts, i.e., pretty much random llamas without any knowledge of what makes a good guard llama or how best to deploy them, still resulted in quite dramatic findings.  Predation of sheep, mostly from coyotes and dogs, went from an average 11% of the herd per year down to only 1% of the herd per year.  Over half of the sheep ranchers reported zero losses afterwards.

One startling fact to me was the observation that 50% of guard dogs did not survive beyond age 3.  I wouldn't have guessed their mortality was that high.  The llamas, adult at age 4, typically lasted 10-15 years.  Their point was that llamas at the time were more expensive to obtain up front but over the long term were considerably more cost effective.

The typical llama strategy when observing a potential threat is to put the sheep in a safe place, then confront the threat by charging it.  The typical coyote or dog seeing a large animal running at them will wisely not stick around to see what happens and that's usually all it takes.  Llamas have been known to kill coyotes that got too close to the sheep, which they do by ramming, kicking and stomping, but mostly they are diligent sentries, confrontational and smart.  Where they get into serious trouble is with packs, wildcats and bear.

Scott

Rebus

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #49 on: July 09, 2017, 11:59:25 PM »
Yeah, John, South America.

The longest and 2nd highest mountain range in the world
From Columbia near the Panama Canal to Cape Horn, over 4,000 miles long
Has the driest desert, the Atacama, outside of the polar regions at an avg. elev. of 10,000 ft.
Look it up, it is a land of extremes

The wild version of the llama, the guanaco, lives in those extremes.  It's a hard life but they are remarkably adapted.  They get by on fog and plants for moisture in the high elevations, and at the low elevations are the only known mammal that can actually drink seawater.  They have oversize lungs and specialized red blood cells to actively live at high elevations without tiring.

The fossil record is rich in camelid species all over north and south America, ranging from dog size to near elephant size.  They appear to have actually originated in north America, but died out during the mass extinctions along with the other large animals like the mastodon.

Scott

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #50 on: July 10, 2017, 12:38:16 AM »
The problem here in may places, is packing water. Our packs are 10 lbs. each, but water at 2.2 lbs. per liter gets heavy, when no water is available for few days, or just wanting to hang out somewhere and it isn't plentiful. 75 lbs. would go a long way. It appears that a pair of alpaca would make for a very efficient family. I had no idea that they are relatively easy to get along with. They don't seem likely to bolt, or run off, but instead would stay near.

This is definitely something to keep in mind. I figure that there will be a time in life when a pack becomes too much and I have been considering some longer treks for a future time...naked
Jbee

















Barefoot all over, all over.

Peter S

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #51 on: July 10, 2017, 10:13:00 AM »
Some years ago we started getting llama farms in the U.K., though they now seem to be mostly alpaca, for the wool rather than anything else. Thanks to Scott I've learned more llama lore in 10 minutes than the preceding 50 years -  who'd a thunk it!

Can't see them catching on as sheepdogs in the UK. Not enough coyotes or wolves in these parts.
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nuduke

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #52 on: July 17, 2017, 09:58:14 PM »

Quote from: Nuduke"
Where are the Andes?
Quote from: Jbegoode
South America. On the western side, all the way down. They are a huge range of huge mountains.
Quote from: Eyesup
Yeah, John, South America
.
Well I never!  I always thought the andes were at the end of your wristees (which is the answer I was expecting, probably from JOhnGW.  Little did I reckon on the downright literalism of my esteemed colleagues quoted above and the probable absence therefore of that crumbling aged pun in the American canon of turgid humour!! ) :D :D :D
Your punmeister, John

eyesup

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #53 on: July 17, 2017, 11:46:20 PM »
Yes, well, John, when lobbing a topical pun across the pond, try to give us a ‘eds up.
With maybe a little imaginative punctuation. ;)

Duane

nuduke

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #54 on: July 18, 2017, 12:01:47 AM »

Q:What do clouds wear under their clothes?
A: Thunderwear!


A little more direct this time with the question and the punchline in a single post! :D
John

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #55 on: April 02, 2019, 05:56:39 AM »
New Post over at the website:
I got an article published in the Naturist Societies "N" magazine, for their Winter issue 2018-19. The newer issue is about to come out next week, so I can now publish it and they have retained their exclusivity.

It is called "Liberation on the Trail."

https://thefreerangenaturist.org/2019/04/02/liberation-on-the-trail/

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

locksmith

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #56 on: April 16, 2019, 07:59:11 AM »
Camping is a bit different here in Alberta.  Clothes are a must.  We have to pack more.  I just hope I can keep camping in the mountains when I'm your age. 

reubenT

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #57 on: April 16, 2019, 03:31:11 PM »
Ray Jardine has worked on ultra light camping gear for a long time and developed his own line of it.  My brother got into it and has made some of his stuff.   usually available as sew it yerself fabric kits.   A tarp with underscreening for bugs works fine instead of tent. He has a super light quilt instead of sleeping bag.    Ray has done extensive traveling himself testing his own designs.  He and his wife have done many long trail hikes end to end, the PC and Appalachian trails,  bicycled around the country,  even rowed clear across the atlantic and skied from the edge of the antarctic to the south pole.   While I don't have the urge to to such thing, I do like the ultra light aspect,  because I wouldn't want to carry any more weight than necessary if I did go backpacking.  It's counterproductive to enjoying the trip to carry a huge weight just in convenience gear.

jbeegoode

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Re: Ultra Light Backpacking
« Reply #58 on: April 16, 2019, 05:45:43 PM »
The Jardine website is fun, trips and tips. I used it to make our tarp. I got a ready made net tent for it. I splurged on a custom quilt, but the idea and their convincing got me under it. That knocked several pounds off of our load. It works better for our needs. The tarp can be reconfigured for rain shelter, or sun shade, in many positions.
Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.