Author Topic: The Art of Free Range Naturism  (Read 26275 times)

Bob Knows

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2015, 06:03:27 PM »
From a distance a pine forest is very dark green, almost black.  Dark green pine needles mix with black bark and create a dark landscape.  Plants work hard to absorb every bit of sunshine they can absorb.  Any bright colored space stands out against the darkness.  That's why flowers are colored, to stand out.  Bright red/pink, bright yellow, bright blue, or white.  Any bright color that reflects rather than absorbing light is unnatural in a forest. 

A dark skin with midsummer tan would blend in quite well I said to myself yesterday as I walked near a stag in the forest.   

 
« Last Edit: August 29, 2015, 06:05:19 PM by Bob Knows »
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reubenT

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2015, 02:17:59 AM »
The more wilderness skills and knowledge one has,  the less equipment is necessary.    But I think a little knife would be the last thing I'd let go of.    I like the swiss with the wood saw in it.    Then a firestarter like the metal match would be the second last thing I'd let go of.   Especially in the damp conditions we so often get in the SE.  A fire can be a lifesaver and it can be hard to find dry tinder.    Gettin lost or hurt is the least of my concerns.  Probably because I don't go out without a good map and keep track of where I am on it.   And I have a trust in divine power that's kept me safe through many an escapade for 50 years.   (around home the map is programmed in the brain)  I have to be amused at the idea of takin TP along.   It hasn't been around very long.   What-da ya think everybody did for thousands of years before?     I think they just used whatever happened to be handy.   My cousin (by marriage,  not actually related)  always takes TP with him.   And incidentally he grew up in town.   I think there's a connection.    I grew up with an outhouse for some years and plenty of woods to roam, and for some reason I don't consider TP a necessity at all when there's an unlimited supply of natural materials out there.  Dirt or sand if nothing else is around.   Going a little better prepared,  I'd take a small cup/kettle for cooking and eating wild greens,  and a tiny bottle of grapefruit seed extract.   Only takes 4 drops per gallon to kill all bad microorganisms in water. Whole lot lighter and smaller than a filter.      Then a sleepin bag and tarp (for rain) would have me just about enough for a multi day packing trip.   Maybe some grain flour to make paddies from those wild greens.

Bob Knows

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2015, 03:20:05 AM »
The more wilderness skills and knowledge one has,  the less equipment is necessary.    But I think a little knife would be the last thing I'd let go of.    I like the swiss with the wood saw in it.   


I carry a swiss army knife with a cork screw.  Over 20 years the cork screw has, perhaps, been its most often used implement.  I bought it after one night at White Tail (nudist) Park in Virginia, USA, in a pouring down rain. My wife and I were staying dry in our tent with a bottle of wine and no opener.  That was almost 40 years ago.  I bought the Swiss Army knife shortly thereafter.


Quote
Then a firestarter like the metal match would be the second last thing I'd let go of.   Especially in the damp conditions we so often get in the SE.  A fire can be a lifesaver and it can be hard to find dry tinder.    Gettin lost or hurt is the least of my concerns.  Probably because I don't go out without a good map and keep track of where I am on it.   

I have never gotten lost in half a century of back country hiking before GPS.  I apparently have a good sense of direction and am able to use a few clues to check directions. 

Quote
And I have a trust in divine power that's kept me safe through many an escapade for 50 years.   (around home the map is programmed in the brain)  I have to be amused at the idea of takin TP along.   It hasn't been around very long.   What-da ya think everybody did for thousands of years before?     I think they just used whatever happened to be handy.   My cousin (by marriage,  not actually related)  always takes TP with him.   And incidentally he grew up in town.  I think there's a connection.    I grew up with an outhouse for some years and plenty of woods to roam, and for some reason I don't consider TP a necessity at all when there's an unlimited supply of natural materials out there.  Dirt or sand if nothing else is around.   

The purpose of TP is to protect your pants.   When you are naked your back side dries and the material flakes off, or in a rain washes off.  Naked humans lived happily for a million years without TP or a substitute, same as all our animal friends.  My backpack emergency kit does have some TP though, to protect my pants if I have to wear them.


 
Quote
Going a little better prepared,  I'd take a small cup/kettle for cooking and eating wild greens,  and a tiny bottle of grapefruit seed extract.   Only takes 4 drops per gallon to kill all bad microorganisms in water. Whole lot lighter and smaller than a filter.     

When I did a lot of back country hiking I carried a chlorine kit.  The water ended up tasting like city water, but it was safe to drink in about 10 minutes. Never tried the grapefruit extract.

Quote
Then a sleepin bag and tarp (for rain) would have me just about enough for a multi day packing trip.   Maybe some grain flour to make paddies from those wild greens.

When I was in the Explorer Scouts the group liked to hike with a used coffee can of rice and raisins which was enough food for several days.  Everything else fit into pockets.  Going naked I would have to carry a day pack for water and such. 

Bob
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jbeegoode

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2015, 10:49:43 AM »
Desert resources are quite different than the forest back east that I grew up in. I could get by without the TP if there was a creek, or nice fat leaves. Many places require burying and I have had my nose offended many times by the gentle bouquet left from others. Depending on the season, a shallow burial is sufficient because wet things dry up and disappear in a couple days or a tad more. The stake that I dig with weights one ounce: http://www.rei.com/product/845328/rei-snow-stake

The small partial roll of TP is nothing to carry. There are no broad leaves here as most plants have small leaves for the heat. Then there is that thing about prickers and survival around here. Sticking sand up there to clean is funky. The grit stays, and you will end up with a disgusting hand. There are seldom creeks, or water and many, no...most of these are dangerous because of the cattle. The stuff doesn't just dry and flake off, it sticks around in the enclosed area. It is not inviting to my companion to smell that, nor to me when I squat, I smell myself. I don't like that. Most of the hunter gatherers around here lived near water sources and 95% (or 92, or 98%, I forget right now) of these are gone due to ground water wells for towns, but mostly cattle. It just ain't the same place, so here, we can't compare with the ancients. The natives, we are pretty sure, around here, were generally totally naked but for ornament, and reed huaraches. TP is little inconvenience compared to the alternatives, so carrying 25% or less of a roll is nothing. I'll stick with this luxury. In a more deciduous area, I see your point, but personally, I wouldn't use the leaf thing without a supplementary creek source to bathe. There is also my lack of familiarity with forest flora.

The TP is also for injury, cleaning, and a band-aide in conjunction with duct-tape, which has many other uses. It also helps with other orifices, like nose blowing. Girls like a wipe after a pee, too.

The water drops are something I carry backpacking as a supplement when the only water might be disgusting and use them after a filter.  with pills etc., you have to wait, most water is cleaned nearly as well with a filter, and chemicals taste crappy. I have a 10 ounce pump filter that I use for convenience, but I carry one of the newer Sawyer filters, which weights only 2 ounces and fits in my fist ($25): https://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

1974, I'm driving on a dirt road in the remote Sierra Nevada Mountains after dropping off a pal near his illicit pot farm. There in the middle of the road, I see a Swiss-like knife. I clean it up, fish scales and mud with a dab of rust and I have a great knife. I built a macrame strap on it, and still have it. I carried all over South America, a great knife. Just a piece of decor broken off when someone ran over it 40 some years ago when I rescued this friend. Like you, I'm sure I have used that cork screw more than any part of it. They are quickest to get to, they pry well, and then there was a whole lot of wine corks :)
Jbee



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balead

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2015, 02:16:16 PM »
These tips on long hikes are all well and good, but I've never been on a hike long enough to need to carry anything. I don't regret that one bit - quality over quantity. Anything that needs to be carried spoils the experience of being naked and free. For me free range naturism is about enjoying areas close to home. Somewhere I can sunbathe and just "be" and to be able to walk around from there without the need to carry anything, and not always clothing. That is not to say that I don't take any accoutrements with me - they are left with the bike I use to get there.

When I first realised I wanted to be outside naked in the sun and air it would take me at least ten minutes to get the courage to take my clothes off in my chosen spot in a wood and even then I felt very conspicuous. Fast forward to today and my clothes are off within seconds of reaching my chosen spot and I feel confident and relaxed at being naked outside. Isn't that what this thread should be about? Encouraging "newbies" that it's easier and less dangerous than they might think. Perhaps it needs questions from them.

Things like where do you start getting used to being outside naked. I would suggest that a public wood is not the ideal place to start. A private preferably little used wood is better even though you are technically trespassing. Even if you do get caught out there it is unlikely to be taken any further. I know from experience! In fact it's probably better to start outside a wood where you are not going to be surprised easily or in large open spaces where anybody about can be seen from way off.

When you start free range naturism the last thing you want to do is go on a long hike! You need to learn that anybody walking in your area is going to be a lot less observant than you and you're likely to see them long before they see you - and even if they do see you it's unlikely to result in anything serious. In fact being relaxed yet alert is one of the great things about free range naturism because you are using all your senses as they were meant to be used.



Dave

jbeegoode

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #20 on: September 01, 2015, 01:49:54 AM »
I like what Balead is saying here, but perhaps we should have named it "ALL things Crafty." I drive to more remote naked, I hike from there naked with essential equipment and I then park the equipment once arriving in a suitable location. The whole idea with the ultralight backpacking is not to just backpack, but get to fantastic natural remote areas and stay free. Maybe day hiking from there. Each step of the way is best without clothing, the best of it without equipment is better still.

If everything is better naked, then we have to include the craft in more everyday, locations, and situations. Even around the home, where many begin.
Jbee   
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reubenT

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2015, 06:23:21 PM »
   I have never used the cork screw on my knife.     The reamer gets use drilling holes occasionally.  I about need a new one,  as it's seen some 25 years of constant use and getting rough,  lost both plastic sides and broke some of it's useful accessories.    What gear is necessary and what's just for convenience is up to individual feelings.   Ultimately nothing is necessary in moderate conditions.   But without skill or in bad conditions it can be hard or impossible with nothing.  And a few accessories for convenience or comfort is fine.   I don't understand the aspect of carrying an 80-100 lb pack loaded with more convenience items than necessities.   Long ago that was the norm.   They thought an axe was critical,  as was a cast iron frying pan.  Maybe even a camp chair.       Tom Brown,  the survivalist of new jersey who was trained by an old indian medicine man,  the grandfather of his friend.    On his own he walked off into the New Jersey wild land leaving everything behind,  including clothes.  And stayed a year.    That's the ultimate.   It's nice to have those skills,  but I'm not called to do it.   Just reading his books is a pretty good education.   Gotta get out and do a few things to get some skills.    Like building a fire.   It can be tricky even with the metal match in damp conditions. 
   Even with Tom Brown,  divine intervention was obvious once.      He was camped out in his bed roll under a tree once.    Got to feeling quite uneasy about something, he didn't know what.   He ended up climbing the tree and tying himself in place so he could doze without falling.  (something he'd figured out how to do,  since wild dogs could be a real menace in those times.)
In the morning he found a branch had fallen and speared his bed. 

Peter S

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2015, 06:45:17 PM »
A few years ago on a visit to Switzerland I saw a shop window display of various Swiss Army Knives. I know the Swiss use different languages depending which part of the country it is, but I was still surprised to see that the Swiss for Swiss Army knife is ... "Swiss Army Knife"

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eyesup

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2015, 09:59:48 PM »
Quote from: John
To assume makes...etc!  No, Duane you can't assume that.
errr . . . You are right. I have made an as...??, ummmm . . . whatever!

The 10 essentials is a list of items to have when hiking, especially in remote or backcountry trails. There is an article on the
REI website that discusses the list and other information for hikers. This is something we taught Scouts when doing any kind of hike, short or long. Ideally you would be with a buddy, but if not these make survival more likely.

Most any hiking website or manual will have this list or one very similar, as seen here. The important thing is to concentrate on the basic list and think about where you will be. Weather affect the list also.

There is an updated one for those with high tech gear, or if you are traditional you can use the old one from the '30's. These are basics and of course you can modify it based on whether you are going on a unique trip.

With regard to the inclusion of TP. As Jbee said it can be used for other things besides it's intended use. I prefer wet wipes that are intended for infants. The package does weigh more than TP but it too has mutiple uses, e.g. cleaning your hands, and is more comapct. The idea is choose smart and try to make an item have multiple uses. That reduces overall weight.


Quote from: balead
Isn't that what this thread should be about? Encouraging "newbies" that it's easier and less dangerous than they might think. Perhaps it needs questions from them.

One of my wife's sayings is, "Wouldn't the world be a boring place if we were all the same", something I remind her of on occasion. Not all will want to practice their hiking the same way, so all advice is valuable. Let the reader pick and choose. Those that wish to do small walks and those that want a long hiking experience can find help here. When I was a kid a did my 1st outdoor naked ramblings. It was in a private wood and it made the initial forays much easier. Had I been living here as a kid, I would have had to use a different venue. There are no woods around here. Scootin' out into the desert would have had to suffice. Remote and/or seldom traveled would be more appropriate where the likelyhood of being caught is less. Whatever works best.

Duane

Bob Knows

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2015, 03:38:39 PM »
My day pack always has my "emergency" kit with some basic first aid items, TP, candle, lighter, small flashlight, compass, string, etc.  If the hike is longer than half a mile I take the pack to carry water or equal, camera, and a small towel.  In the past few years I added a GPS.  Often I carry over only one shoulder and then the other to minimize tan lines.  I have used the flashlight on a trail when I didn't get back by dark. 

My pack doesn't include "cover up" clothes. In most places I just leave my clothes behind unless I may not come out of the woods where I went in and left my clothes. 
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
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nuduke

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2015, 01:32:55 AM »
I'm assuming TP is toilet paper rather than tarpaulin or is it something else?

John

jbeegoode

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2015, 08:56:55 AM »
Up. Toilet paper. If you have ever forgotten it at home, going without is a traumatic memory.
Jbee
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Kayaker

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2016, 04:07:48 AM »
I see there are no female hiker comments here just yet.  We carry an interesting array of materials which are mostly left in the vehicle but are, nonetheless, available.  The  most important items for a day hike from the ladies perspective (non girly girl) would be a wee wad of tissue, water, sunscreen, a lightweight long sleeve shirt, sunglasses, comfortable back pack, snacks,  and a hat. Maybe bug spray depending on locale.  For Spartan hikes less than four hours that reduces to hat and sunglasses. For a Girly girl... Well there wouldn't be any hike unless there was a gift shop involved and an elevator.

That being said - one can expect a vast assortment of flashlights, electric matchsticks, pocket knives, collapsing eating utensils, towels, soaps, cooking pots, luxury alcoholic beverages, toothbrushes, hair scrunchies, snack foods, aspirin, band aids, maps, emergency phone numbers, calamine, several pairs of shoes, aloe Vera..cameras.. All in a tidy duffel or two or four back in the car.... Naturally.   You know, the Hiking closet.  :)
« Last Edit: February 19, 2016, 04:16:03 AM by Kayaker »

nuduke

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2016, 10:54:32 PM »
Yes Kayaker Lisa,

Familiar picture in some respects!  I'm finding that the trunk (boot) of my car is gradually beginning to fill with hiking paraphernalia, such as walking poles, towel & clean up gear, spare shoes, rucksack and the like.  I don't hike for very long (an hour or two) typically but I'm quite pleased to recognise this accumulation - it means I'm getting out and about more!

Not that I've done much this week - spent much of it in central London on business and even going back tomorrow on more!  I hope as the weather warms up I'll be at home more and able to take to the fields and hillocks.

John

Kayaker

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Re: The Art of Free Range Naturism
« Reply #29 on: March 21, 2016, 10:46:23 PM »
Tanman is happily free ranging pert near every day all day.  We've had an early spring after a very wet winter and he's off into the sun every second its up.  He's happy. Loves his sun.