Author Topic: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions  (Read 1350 times)

nuduke

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2019, 09:29:11 PM »

I get a reaction to sun sometimes, causing urticaria, also to some suncreams, and last week I had a reaction to deet-containing insect repellant.
It's really hard to ascribe simple causes or develop simple solutions to what can often be due to complex reasons.    Whilst I definitely don't decry the application of the scientific method to ascertain if something is beneficial or harmful, equally I find the "50 million robins can't be wrong" adage useful in assessing things like this:  If millions are using something without ill effect and getting benefit then broadly speaking it must be ok!  I am also aware that 50 million robins might raise an argument to that!
John

ric

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2019, 10:02:04 AM »
the only problem with the 50 million robins is they could all be using something without ill effects that theyve noticed,   or the ill effects only become apparent several years on.

nuduke

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2019, 11:53:09 AM »

This is indeed the flaw in the robins argument, Ric!
John

BlueTrain

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2019, 01:07:17 PM »
I think I may have mentioned before that none of my relatives ever died of cancer (skin or otherwise) but they're all dead, just the same. One of my aunts was a real sun worshiper, really the only one in the family. She would get positively brown in the summer. Her husband, who never wore anything but long sleeve shirts and long pants, developed a spot of skin cancer. Interestingly enough, my aunt was quite close to another member of the family who was Hispanic and the only one who addressed her by her real name, which was Iris, instead of her nickname.

All of my skin problems, such as they have been, undoubtedly developed because of sunburns I received as a child. It is curious, however, that the problems only developed on my face, rather than my back and shoulders. These days, however, I mostly stay out of the sun, even when I've hiked nude. All of my outings are in the deep, dark woods, which I prefer to think of instead as cool and shady. They aren't that cool, though, and they're damp, too.

nuduke

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2019, 06:52:38 PM »

Woodland is best!  Warm when its warm and less breezy when it's chilly.  Sunny in places, shady in others.  For me, woodland 'talks' to you more than perhaps any other landscape.  Woods are mysterious and welcoming, interesting and - they hide you too to enjoy all that lovely greenness in luxurious isolation!  And when there's water - stream or pool, lake or mere - they are the best.
John

BlueTrain

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2019, 09:32:01 PM »
The woods I regularly visit give me the feeling of being in the jungle and sometimes birds give it that jungle sound effect, too. Only the lawn mowers spoil the mood. I've always especially enjoyed the old Jungle Jim (Johnny Weissmuller) movies in which he never sweats, never walks in the mud--except for quicksand--and never seems to get thirsty. My jungle is muddy and 90 degrees in the shade.

It has birds and animals, though. Today I saw an owl, an exceptional sighting. Plenty of mud still but no quicksand.

It's all about escapism.

jbeegoode

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2019, 08:14:28 PM »
I'm partial to woods. They're user friendly. They tend to be less biodiverse, though. I figure that you are referring to deciduous places, like back east. They forests out here are often much different. Often the pine forests can get so same that it is easy to get lost in them. Still, there is always a nugget of interests here and there, particularly when I only visit them on occasion. The forests here are generally up in mountains, where magnificent vistas pop out and the up and down can get challenging. The elevation changes the eco-makeup quite a bit.

I was looking at a spot in Upstate New York on the Young Naturist site a couple of days ago. A nice broad waterway, shade, rocks, bedrock.

The jungles that I visited in in South America were more like back-east forests, with thick growth along watercourses, often complete with water. It can get pretty hot and buggy in those woods. Still, the tradition was naked natives. They were much like the Virginia woods around Falls Church and the James River that I grew up in.

I remember sleeping in a bag by a campfire in Michigan. No critter worries.

Jbee
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BlueTrain

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2019, 08:40:24 PM »
I live about eight miles from Falls Church. It is definitely hot, buggy and damp, going on wet, in these woods. Chances are, however, that 150 years ago, there would be a lot more open, cleared land used for agriculture.

jbeegoode

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2019, 09:29:46 PM »
Our Falls Church subdivision was new. There were pretty pristine creeks behind the homes. It was comfortable temps for kids dressed in just shorts. Sometimes we would strip off, but felt like we were being naughty. There were salamanders, turtles, tortoises, frogs, toads, a few small fish, clean water, rocks, mud, dirt, and more. It was across from McLean High School and over the hill. No beltway.

On Ft. Eustis, I could ride my bike everywhere. I'd play in the James River, in the reeds, where the water lapped up. There were marshes, and swamps. There were fields. On the military base, it was safe and lots of other kids. We smoked "boy scout cigarettes, dug out forts and covered them. We'd play war games in the woods and climb trees. We'd wear just short pants and white underwear all summer.

Teenagers in Battle Creek Michigan, there were woods and undeveloped properties around the subdivision. There were lakes and we had a Christmas tree farm out in the country to spend weekends, drinking beer, cheap wine and smoking everything. I remember getting nude in the country. Once I found myself stuck on the back bumper of a VW bug naked, riding through the country roads. I remember purposely spending entire summers barefoot. I remember being naked and finding out that I was the only one of us that wasn't allergic to poison ivy, when camping. There was a creek and toad jabbing. There were farms to wander and we could yell as loud as we pleased, all night.
Jbee

Those woods were wonderful, a long time ago, and still very dear to me.
Barefoot all over, all over.

BlueTrain

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2019, 11:25:47 PM »
Where I grew up "in town" there was a pond about three blocks away with a narrow patch of woods, bushes mostly, on one side. It was used by a local sporting goods store for boat demonstrations. A few kids, none of whom I knew, skinny-dipped, but neither me or any of my friends would. That is, we would get in that water for anything. After my mother died (1959), we moved outside of town and there was another larger patch of woods, hardly a forest and no big trees, that was really good for roaming around in. Then, when I was in high school, we moved to the country. That's where the log house, no inside toilet, etc., was, which didn't bother me in the least. I had no expectation of anything. Anyway, there were lots and lots of woods there and that's where I really started nude hiking. I'm sure I've mentioned that before. In contrast to where I live now, there was virtually no wildlife around there, except for birds and snakes.

jbeegoode

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2019, 11:30:01 PM »
Nuduke started this talk of forests and their best-ness. We have been responding, that forests are great places.

Japanese study, etc. tells us of the researched health benifits. I dunno, but it makes sense to me, at my first read.
"For generations, mankind has struggled to find a cure for cancer. We’ve spent billions on research and development as thousands of therapies have been used to treat different forms of the disease.

"Once the pharmaceutical industry got involved, those therapies quickly narrowed to expensive drugs and harmful treatments that have become the standard of care in Western medicine.

In Japan, they have a different approach that’s been scientifically proven to increase the body’s anti-cancer ability: forest bathing.

Did you know that by 2050, nearly 2/3 of the world’s population is projected to live in urban centers? Or that the EPA estimates that the average American spends 87% of their time indoors, and another 6% in their vehicles?1,2

We’re becoming an increasingly sedentary culture, and there are many benefits to exercise and time spent outside. But as it turns out, time in nature is substantially more beneficial than outdoor time in the city.
What is Forest Bathing?

Forest bathing, or shinrinyoku as it’s known in Japan, has been around for thousands of years.

Contrary to what you may think, forest bathing has nothing to do with water. In essence, forest bathing is a short, leisurely trip to the forest used for relaxation and recreation. It is NOT strenuous exercise like jogging, climbing, or hiking. It’s been used for centuries to help with mood, stress, and energy.

The aromatic benefits alone have been recognized by the Forest Agency of Japan for nearly 40 years now, and researchers using the Profile of Mood States test successfully showed that forest bathing significantly decreased anxiety, depression, and anger.3

And while these positive effects are great, it may offer a significantly more substantial benefit: Forest bathing has been shown to boost the immune system and prevent cancer. You read that correctly. Several published studies have found that forest bathing trips – in addition to improving mood and energy, decreasing stress and anxiety, fighting inflammation, regulating blood sugar, and reducing hypertension – may have a preventative effect on cancer generation and development.
Natural Killer Cells, Cancer, and the Immune System

In order to explain how this works, we’ll first need to talk about natural killer cells. The immune system is our best defense against disease and plays an important role in combating cancer. But tumor cells have a unique ability to escape immune surveillance by mutating and disguising themselves as other cells. That’s where natural killer cells come in.

Natural killer (NK) cells are white blood cells found in our lymphatic system. These cells are specifically designed to hunt cancerous cells and destroy them, hence the name “natural killer”. When it comes to the immune system, these cells are our first and best defense against cancer. Healthy NK cells are absolutely vital in your body’s battle with disease.4

What’s especially interesting is that NK cells identify and destroy diseased or damaged cells without any conditioning or prior exposure. Unlike the rest of the immune system, which learns through exposure to new bacteria or viruses, NK cells can identify cancerous cells immediately. This means that the more NK cells we have working in our bodies, the better protected we are from chronic diseases like cancer.5

And this is where forest bathing comes in. Many studies over the past 15 years have examined the effects of forest bathing on immune function, all concluding that the result is an increase in both the number of NK cells and their activity level.

This means that time in nature equips the immune system with more of these “cancer assassins” AND keeps these cells functioning at the highest levels.3,5-8

This is HUGE news.

The absolute best way to treat and beat cancer is to stop it from developing in the first place. And it turns out that keeping our immune system strong may be as simple as getting out into nature. The researchers found that the benefits to the immune system and NK cells only occurred with forest bathing trips – not with trips in an urban setting. They also evaluated the impact on men and women in two separate studies.

Both groups experienced increased NK activity for more than 7 days after a trip. For women, the effects could last up to 30 days.3,6,8
5 Additional Forest Bathing Benefits

In addition to preventing cancer, forest bathing has been shown to have many other benefits. Here are our top 5 benefits of forest bathing.
1| Improving Mood and Energy

A 2007 study published in Public Health found that forest bathing can be extremely effective in managing acute emotions. In the study of nearly 500 participants, hostility and depression were significantly reduced after forest bathing compared to the control groups. Additionally, forest bathing can increase energy and vigor.9

Dr. Qing Li, considered one of the foremost authorities on forest bathing and its medicinal properties, authored a study in 2016 showing that people who spend regular time in the forest have more energy throughout the day and get better quality sleep at night. Forest bathing also helps to regulate dopamine levels, which increase focus and productivity.10
2| Lowering Stress and Anxiety

Forest bathing has long been considered beneficial for mental health, and several studies utilizing the Profile of Mood States or similar tests have confirmed this. One of the ways in which this happens is a reduction in cortisol. Dr. Li and other researchers have consistently demonstrated a correlation between forest bathing and cortisol regulation.3,9,11

Cortisol, like adrenaline, is an important hormone that is released in high amounts when we are in fight or flight” mode, but also helps with several basic functions. Cortisol helps keep us alert, manages metabolic processes, helps with memory, reduces inflammation, and balances blood pressure.12

However, there is a direct and proven correlation between chronically high cortisol levels and cancer. Emotional stress is a major contributing factor to the six leading causes of death in the United States: cancer, coronary heart disease, accidental injuries, respiratory disorders, cirrhosis of the liver, and suicide.

As it turns out, a simple walk through the trees may be all it takes to reduce stress.11-13
3| Reducing Inflammation

Inflammation is the body’s natural stress response to injury, but when inflammation persists, it can be extremely harmful. Chronic inflammation can result from disease, injury, or an unhealthy lifestyle. Doctors and scientists agree that chronic inflammation is likely at the root of most chronic disease.14

The D-limonene in forest air has been shown to reduce lung inflammation. Studies have shown that those with asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have shown symptom improvement after forest bathing. This is because oxygen intake is increased, and inflammation is lessened.

A 2016 study confirmed this, finding decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and stress hormones in those who spent time forest bathing.15
4| Regulating Blood Sugar

Forest bathing can also help reduce blood glucose levels, which is extremely important. High blood sugar and diabetes are both risk factors for heart disease and cancer – the leading causes of death in the U.S.6-7,14,16

Cancer cells feed on glucose, a byproduct of refined sugars and carbs. The best environment you can create for cancer cells is one with elevated blood sugar. In addition to diabetes and heart disease, keeping healthy blood glucose levels can increase metabolism, provide you with more energy, and help fight off chronic disease.

Because forest bathing has an effect on hormone secretion, it’s able to help our bodies regulate glucose. The importance of a healthy diet is paramount, but time in nature can assist in regulating our glucose production.16
5| Combating Hypertension

A 2017 study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine found overwhelming evidence that forest bathing can help reduce both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure is the pressure in your vessels when your heart beats. Diastolic blood pressure is the vascular pressure when your heart rests. Both numbers are important, though systolic pressure is considered a stronger risk factor for heart disease.17

20 trials involving over 700 participants all reached the same conclusion: forest bathing can significantly reduce blood pressure. There is a clear connection between heart disease and cancer, and risk factors include high blood pressure, obesity, and an inactive lifestyle.17

In the U.S., over 600,000 people die every year from heart disease; that’s about 1 in 4 deaths annually. Hypertension is one of the leading risk factors for heart disease and other causes of mortality, but you can lower your risk for these diseases just by taking a leisurely stroll through the woods.17,18

There are many, many ways to help prevent disease and illness; diet and exercise are chief among them.

But the science is in: forest bathing is an extremely effective way to protect your health.

Not only can you improve your mental and physical health, you can actually stop cancer in its tracks. More importantly, forest bathing is dose-dependent. The more time you spend in nature, the greater its impact on your health. So take some time away from your phone or computer, throw some shoes on, and get outside!"
https://thetruthaboutcancer.com/forest-bathing-benefits-cancer/?utm_campaign=eastern-medicine&utm_medium=email&utm_source=all-actives-ttac&utm_content=forest-bathing-benefits-cancer&mpweb=144-8000886-442413327

Jbee
« Last Edit: June 04, 2019, 07:59:51 PM by jbeegoode »
Barefoot all over, all over.

ric

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2019, 07:26:31 PM »
3 screens worth jb and i read all of it :)
sounds like our woods in southern uk are more open and the trees probably smaller . here in central somerset the woods tend to be on the limestone ridges typically 2-300 ft above sea level with little surface water, but soils have a high clay content so can be wet and muddy for long periods,  we get a wide variety of birds and butterflies, a surprising number of damsel flies considering the lack of surface water, grey squirrels, rabbits and deer, throw in a few slow worms and thats about it.

jbeegoode

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2019, 08:06:11 PM »
I didn't write all of that. I was very tired and in a hurry, when I lifted that off of a newsletter and pasted it in. Then I forgot to put in the, now installed quotes. I had read of that study before. It seemed appropriate. Anyway, quotes are there, now. Yep, an epic even for me! ;)

Jbee
Barefoot all over, all over.

Bob Knows

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #28 on: June 05, 2019, 04:10:38 AM »
Sun Screen wasn't a thing while I was growing up.   As a teen there were ads for "sun tan lotion" which supposedly helped you get a tan more quickly.   We just learned to be careful not to get too much sun. 
Human bodies are natural, comfortable, and green.
To see more of Bob you can view his personal photo page
http://www.photos.bradkemp.com/greenbare.html

ric

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Re: Sunscreen Health Issues and Solutions
« Reply #29 on: June 05, 2019, 09:50:58 AM »
theres been a commercial running on british tv lately,   young daughter tells dad he should be wearing sunscreen,   he responds were in uk not abroad on holiday,   a dayglow sun on a bike then responds its still the same sun, implying dads a bit thick not to realise this.



my reaction was if i dont need sunscrean in uk , this ads telling me i wont need it on holiday.... i ought really report it to advertising standards , but i cant be bothered.

but it does show the intellectual level of the tv ad industry generally.

theres another long running one for spec savers opticians... old sheperd without glasses shearing his sheep... does the sheepdog as well
tag line "should have gone to spec savers" implying he couldnt tell the difference between a sheep and a dog,   
all it says to me is everyone involved in the add is a bit thick dont realise .... even a totally bind man could tell the difference by feel... be a tad difficult to shear a sheep by feel....   a lot of dog owners do clip their dogs thick winter coat in spring

in a typical hours tv were being fed 20 minutes of this garbage.... i tend to read novels in five minute chunks..... or if really deperate surf the net on the tablet whilst the tv ads are on.